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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, June 28, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1918-06-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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T
"CITY POLKS" ARE HELPING
IN KANSAS WHEAT FIELDS.
Something like 100,00 men—may
be a few thousand more, maybe a
few thousand less—are out in the
Kansas wheat fields, or will be before
July has passed, harvesting this
year's war-winning crop.
Where does this army of harvest
hands come from? Well, where does
Pershing'sarmy of fighters come from
—from stores and banks and farms
and offices and shops, from every
"trade, every profession, every walk of
Just so in Kansas.
American life.
The army of harvesters comes from (
the villages and towns and cities—
men of every calling, men of every ;
kind, who left their town affairs for
a few weeks and flocked to farms fOT
precisely the same reason that their
relatives and frineds came to the col- 1
ors—to play a part in winning the j
war.
Kansas is using as much outside
farm labor as could be secured, of
course, but that supply is sufficient to
fill only a small part of the need. Kan
sas is doing what every state has
done or must do—harvest its own
crop with its own labor, for the most
part.
Kansas towns have "shut up shop"
so to Bpeak, during the heavy period
of the harvest. Men from towns and
cities have ft;ft their comfy Jobs and
professions and are putting in a few
weeks of the toughest work they ever
tackled—doing it for sheer patriot
ism, although, of course, they earn
harvest-hand wages—doing it to save
a food crop, the saving of which is
as necessary as the holding of a sec
tor on the fighting line.
It is an inspiring picture of patri
otism. First the young manhood of
a free people marching away to fight
for the world's freedom; now the
home remaining manhood leaving
desk ad shop and turning to the har
vest fields, in order that the fighters
and the civilians sustaining the fight
ers may be fed and the fight continue
to a victorious end.
It really means that the Allies have
won another great battle—that 1 b the
true appraisal of this scheme in Kan
sas, where men from every town and
city went into physical training class
es for a few weeks hardening, and
then swept across the grain fields,
toiling determinedly—not because of
any compulsion, not because of wage
inducements, not because of anything
under the shining sun except that
they are Americans, and therefore are
willing and eager to work until they
drop if that will help crush the Hun.
The town women of Kansas volun
teered for the harvest army, and so
did the boys. And they are working
—the women peeling potatoes and
washing dishes and cooking food for
the harvesters; the boys flttting in
at every sort of odd Jobs for which
they are sufficiently strong or skillful
—the men thus being free to devote
their entire energy to the actual har
vest.
For months the United States De
partment of Agriculture has advocat
ed for every community and county
the policy which Kansas has given
state-wide application. The people of
Nebraska, Minnesota, North and
South Dakota plan similar concert of
action as the harvest swings north
ward. In every state and for every
harvest, or crop emergency, this is the
safe and certain and patriotic solution
of the farm-labor problem—the utili
zation of town volunteers to the ex
tent that farm-labor needs may re
quire.
COMMISSIONERS' PROCEEDINGS.
At the meeting of the board of
county commissioners held on June 3,
1918, the following bills were allow
ed on the road and bridge fund:
J. T. Derricott_
Wm. Derricott_
Walter Hymas_
B. H. Kunz...
Robert Kunz..
Leroy Kunz___
Hyrum OlBen_
Geo. Peterson....-.
Sivll Nelson____
Qeo. NelBon___
Alex Peterson__
D. J. Kunz.:...
Alva A. Kunz___
Edwin Alleman_
Nelse Nelson..
R. H. Kunz..
Verdun Sorensen_
Sam Humphreys..
H. A. Dayton__
Roy R. Chugg
Lamon Clark_
8. E. Hymas....
Bert Orr_
A. A. Kunz...
Oneal Kunz.,_
H. D. Kunz.-.
Albert Lindsay..
Stephen Sleight_
Ross Sleight -—
Jesse Sorenson_
Parley Peterson-.
Orlando Kunz___
Oliver Peterson_
Jesse Buhler __
Jas. Eastwood_
A. P. Peterson__
Isaac Johnson...
Cyril Humphreys__
Geo. H. Sparks... .
H. Edward Sutton.
Labor, etc., Com. Dist. No. 3.
—f 124.00
J. 4.50
._ 36.00
._ 123.00
18.00
10 00
_ 9.60
6.0C
31.50
... 12.00
8.30
- 61.00
_ 8.00
_ 61.00
... 18.00
_ 10.00
... 44.85
6.00
24.00
... 45.00
... 10.00
.... 123.69
FRED C. EVANS,
Chm. Pro Tem.
H. H. BROOMHEAD, Clerk.
....$ 27.76
- 15.00
7.00
8.75
32.00
6.00
16.00
67.76
78.00
53.00
...49.10
65.50
36.50
4.40
12.00
2g.90
12.00
10.60
3.00
8.85
7.50
.._ 10.50
7.00
45.76
1.76
102.50
57.76
6.00
83.00
16.00
.... 57.60
._ 61.76
._. ' 21.00
__ 21.00
6.00
25.90
6.00
9.00
3.00
... 26.10
J. C. Jensen____
Albert Kunz....
Fred Aschllman_,_
Fred Hunzeker__
Harvey Perkins_
Adolph Bisegger_
Augusth Scmid__
Wilford Hayes_
Alma Hayes....
Henry Teuscher..
Stevens Impt. Co..
John Williams __
Henry Zumbrunnen.
Alfred Jensen_
Jacob Jones___
A. L. Berrey...—
Sharon Lumber Co.._.
Robert jScffmld _
Lester Armatage..
Kot Payne.....
Ernest Bowman..
Hodson-Feenaughty Co.
Attest:
Raise Calves
Without Milk
We sell the Security Calf Food, on which
you can raise your calves as perfectly as
you can on whole milk at a saving' of from
$10 to $12 over the whole milk method. A
$2.25 pail of Security Calf Compound will
raise your calf and if you are not satisfied
with results we will refund your money.
Come in and let us explain its merits.
Williams & Hess
Phone 129
MONTPELIER COAL &
Lumber Co.
WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF
Building Materai
DIAMOND COAL
CANNON COAL
FENCE POSTS
SEWER PIPE
Prompt Delivery
Phone 7W.


ARMY STORKS IN FRANCE
SELL GOODS TO SOLDIERS
I
Prices quoted for June on merchan
dise in the huge general stores oper
ated by the Quartermaster Corps in
France show that members of the Ex
peditionary Forces may secure goods
at prices lower than retail prices in
effect in this country.
q " 0t „ a V„°. n8 iT : " aU pound , !
package chocolate, 11 cents, can
cherries, -4 cents; can of cocoa, 14
cents; pocket combs, 6 cents; can of
corn, 10 cents; shaving brushes, 15
bruBh ™- 12 ? enta \ can °*
stringless beans, 10 cents, bottle of
n«S 8I Q 9 ale ' f 9 Ce * nts i can plum pud
standard $5 safety ra
zors, $1.75, pair shoe laces, 3 cents,
talcum Powder, 5 cents; pound
10 ceots; spool cotton
^ ' r ® ad ' * cents; 2 ' oanc ® P acka * e
tobac £°; 7 cents; hand soap,
U a C w t8: Bh . aV '
B BoaP ' * on" 18 ' * bP \\ le w orceBter
shire Bauqe, 20 cents; linen handker
chiefs, 16 cents; pint bottle olives 23
"î, s ' *^ een P eas - 10 cents; shoe
polish, 9 cents
Although the men are issued ample
rations, tho quartermaster stores are
upended to the enlisted men for the
The Load Must Be
Divided
%
Ï
8>!
K!
we are confronted by a constantly in*
creasing deficit.
We are glad to assume as much of
the load as we can poseibly carry. We
feel it is our patriotic duty to impose
no burden upon the public which we
might carry ourselves. But our re
sources are limited as they are in any
other business, and we have finally
reached, and even passed, the limit.
The question of service is a ques
tion of revenues. Hence, the problem
of producing revenues adequate to the
needs of the service is one with which
the public and the Company are mu
tually concerned.
E are doing everything in our
power to assist in the prose
cution of the war. We have
met every requirement of the Govern
ment in the way of furnishing facil
ities for its needs. At the same time
we have successfully maintained com
mercial service of satisfactory quality.
We have done this in the face of
•normously increased costs of ma
terial and labor. In fact, it Vs been
a tremendous burden, and we have car
ried the load alone.
The difficulty lies In the fact that
our revenues have not increased in
proportion to our expense. Telephone
rates have remained stationary while
everything that goes into the render
ing of telephone service has advanced
in cost.
This condition has continued until
w
3
3
3
5?
Existing conditions maks it iaapdra
adjustments bo iatro
tive that
ï
*
sur ad against deterioration through in
%
The Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Co.
a
1
.
'i
2
purpose of permitting them to add to
their menu or to satisfy individual
desires for dainties or delicacies. The
highest grade of merchandise only Is
carried in stock so that the men may
he sure of having the best, whether
in rations or extra supplies.
Meats, groceries, fish, vegetables,
notions, toilet articles, smokers' arti
cles, and scores of miscellaneous
I items are Included in the published |
! Mats. These lists are made available
to each company and purchases may
be made either for cash or on credit,
Among the staples to be found in
the8e chain ator< £ are; Fresh beefi
ham. bacon, turkey, potatoes, rice,
hominy, beans, onions, coffee, tea, su
gar cheese, cocoa, butter, and evapo
arted frult8 . The canned fru , ts a P nd
vegetables include: Apples, peacbea,
apr j C ots, pears, cherries, currants,
pineapples, prunes, asparagus, sweet
corn, tomatoes, mushrooms, sweet po
tatoes, spinach, squash, turnips, and
beans. Included in the list of canned
me ats and fi 8 h are: Lobsters, oysters,
sa imon, mackerel, cod, sardines,
8h rimps. herring, deviled crabs, sau
sage8> tongue, turkey, deviled hapn,
corned beef, corned beef hash, roast
beef, and mincemeat,
For the man with a sweet tooth
there are: Jams, Jellies, preserves,
raisins, apple butter, maple sirup, mo
lasses, cranberry sauce, citron, nuts,
candy, etc. The smoker may purch
ase smoking and chewing tobacco, ci
gars. cigarettes, pipes, cigarette pa
pers, and matches. The incidental
needs of all the men are supplied with ;
razors, combs, brushes for all purpo
buttons. soap, shaving sticks.
i
shaving mugs, mirrors, rasor strops,
shoe polish, shoe laces, toilet water,
talcum powder, tooth powder, witch
hazel, towels, handkerchiefs, pocket
knives. needles, thread, candles, and
playing cards.
NOTICE FOB PUBLICATION |
Department of the Interior, U. S.
June 22, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that John;
H. Bauman, of Geneva, Idaho, who.
October 1, 1917, made Homestead
entry. No. 029516, for S% NE%,
SB *4, Sec. 30; Lots 1 and 2, Sec
tion 31, Township 12 South, Range
46 East, Boise Meridian, has filed,
notice of intention to make Anal j
three-year Proof, to establish claim 1
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, U. 8. Commissioner,!
at his office in Montpelier, Idaho, on
the 3rd day of August, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
John Teuscher, Alfred BlschofT,
David BlschofT, and Henry Teuscher,
all of Geneva, Idaho.
on
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
6-28-6t
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho,
June 22. 1918.
Notice Is hereby given that James
V. Hanson, of Montpelier, Idaho,
who, on April 19, 1916, and January
19, 1917, made Homestead entries.
No. 019526 and 927029, for 8W%
\E%,*W% SE14 NE»4 SE%, SE%
NE%, Sec. 7; E% NW%, SW%
W14. Section 8, Township 12 South,
'lange 45 East, BoiBe Meridian, has
.lied notice of intention to make final
three-year Proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, U. S. Commissioner, at
his office in Montpelier, Idaho, on the
trd day of August, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
James W. McDonald, Joseph H.
Orchard. Romaine Follick, and John
A. Perkins, all of Montpelier, Idaho.
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
6-28>6t

NOTICE FOB PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior, U. S. j
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho, June.
1, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Hans
Sorensen, of Georgetown, Idaho, who,
on February 11th 1916 made Home
stead Entry No. 019668, and on May
13th 1916, made additional^ home- j
stead entry No. 024176 for E* SW
| J4. WH SÏU , £> JW %. Wg, NE ,
filed notice of intention to make
Three Year Proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, United States Commis
sioner, at Montpelier, Idaho, on the
13th day of July, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Junius Freeman, Frank A. Soren
sen, and Joseph P. Rasmussen, of
Georgetown, Idaho, and Louis E.
Munk, of Montpelier, Idaho.
• J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
Make a regular habit of eating
slowly, masticate your food thorough
ly, and you may have no further
trouble. If you should, take one of
ChamberIain's Tablets immediately
ifter supper.
6-7-6t
To Prevent Belching.
ED. C. RICH
HIGH GRADE GROCERIES
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
I
W. H. Smith
Edwin L. McClave
If You Want to Buy a
HOME
a farm or a lot to build on, we have some
that are very cheap and some that can be
had on very easy terms. WHY PAY
RENT.
We sell Life, Health and Accident, Fire
and Automobile Insurance, that is relia
ble.
We have money to loan on irrigated or
part irrigated land at 8 per cent, no com
mission charged.
Invest in real estate and see it grow in
value. Montpelier is the place to invest.
Buy insurance and let the other fellow
worry. Come in and talk it over and see
if we can't save you some money.
BEAR RIVER VALLEY LAND & ABSTRACT CO.
chronic Constipation.
p firh _ nR vou have never thought of
P h ^„ disorder is due to £ lack
molsture in the resldual matt er of
food „ wll , drlnk an abun _
o, water, eat r.w „alt. and
take lota of exercise, you may he able
eventually to overcome it entirely. In
the meantime use the most mild and
gentle laxatives. Strong and harsh
cathartics take too much water out
of the system and make a bad matter
worse. Chamberlain's Tablets are
easy an dpleasant to take, and moBt
agreeable in effect. Give them a trial.
NOTICeT FOR PUBLICATION
Deparment of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho,
June 8, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Ja
cob Kunz, of Montpelier, Idaho,
who, on December 29th, 1914, made
Homestead Entry No. 019360, and
on October 11th, 1916, made addi
j tioual homestead entry No. 021093,
for SE% NE >4 Section 20, NW%
8WU and NW14, Section 21, Town
ship 14 South, Range 46 East, Boise
Meridian, has filed notice of inten
tion to make Three Year Proof, to
establish claim to the land above
described, before M. B. Cherry, U. S.
Commissioner, at Montpelier, Idaho,
on the 20th day of July, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Arnold
Cozzens, John Kunz and John R.
Manl, all of Montpelier, Idaho.
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
William
Zumbrunnen,
6-14-6t
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Blackfoot. Idaho, May
18, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that David
W. Davis, of Montpelier, Idaho, who,
on May 10, 1915, and January 20,
1916, made Homestead Entry and ad
ditional homestead entry. No. 020802
NWU 8WU, Sec. 3; Lot 1, SEÙ
NWU SWU, Sec. 1; Lot 1. SEU
! NEU, NEU SEU. Sec. 4. Township
14 South, Range 45 East; and SEU
SEU. Sec. 33, SWU SWU. Section
34, Township 13 South, Range 45
East, Boise Meridian, has filed notice
of intention to make final three-year
proof, to establish claim to the land
above described, before M. B. Cherry,
U. S. Commissioner, at his office in
Montpelier, Idaho, on the lat day of
July, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
W. Wodruff Clark, Edwin C. Cook,
John R. Williams and Albert Kunz,
all of Montpelier, Idaho.
5-24-6t
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
TIME APPOINTED FOR PROVING
WILL.
In the Probate Court of the County
of Bear Lake, State of Idaho.
In the matter of the eatate of Sol
omon W. Tremelllng, deceased.
State of Idaho, County of Bear
Lake, as.
Pursuant to an order of aaid Court,
made on the 13th day of June, 1918,
notice is hereby given that on Mon
day, the 1st day of July, 1918, at 11
o'clock a. m. of said day, at the
court room of said Court, at the court
house in the city of Paris, county of
Bear Lake, has been appointed as the
time and place for proving the will of
said Solomon W. Tremelllng, deceas
ed. and for hearing the application
of Edward M. Pugmlre for the issu
ance to him of letters testamentary,
when and where any person interest
ed may appear and contest the same.
Dated June 13th, 1918.
E. J. HADDOCK,
Clerk.
I (Seal}
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho,
June 22, 1918.
Notice iB hereby given that Leroy
Ilill, of Bloomington, Idaho, who, on
May 15th, 1916. made Homestead
entry, No. 024022, for SE% NW%,
E% SW%, SW>4 SE%, Section 18,
Township 16 South, Range 46 East,
Boise Meridian, has filed notice of in
tention to make Three-year Proof,
to establish claim to the land above
described, before M. B. Cherry, U. S
Commissioner, at Montpelier, Idaho,
on the 5th day of August, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Clarence Aland, Hyrum Ester
holdt and Levi Aland, of Pegram,
Idaho, and ErneBt Payne, of Bloom
ington, Idaho.
J. T. CARRUTH.
Register.
6-28-6t
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office, at Blackfooth, Idaho,
June 22, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Clar
ence G. Aland, of Pegram, Idaho,
who, on May 15th, 1916, made Home
stead entry. No. 024021, for S%
NEU . NU SEU. Section 19; 8%
SW >4, EU SWU, Sec. 20, Twp. 16
South, Range 46 East, Boise Meridi
an, has filed notice of intention to
make Three-year Proof, to establish
claim to the land above described,
before M. B. Cherry, U. S. Commis
sioner, at Montpelier, Idaho, on the
6th day of August, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Leroy Hill, of Bloomington, Hyrum
Esterholdt, Levi Aland and John A.
Aland, of Pegram, Idaho.
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
6-28-6t
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Deparment of the Interior, U. 8.
Land Office at Blackfoot. Idaho,
June 8, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Albert
S. Dimick, of Montpelier, Idaho, who,
on November 1, 1916, made Home
stead Entry, No. 017984, for 8%
SWU, NEU8WU. SEUNWU. Sec
tion 26, Township 13 South, Range
44 East, Boise Meridian, has filed
notice of intention to make final
Three-Year Proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, U. *8. Commissioner,
at his office in Montpelier, Idaho, on
the 19th day of July, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Arthur B. Dalrymple, Albert W.
Dimick, William Kent and Dexter
Dalrymple, all of Montpelier, Idaho.
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
6-i4-et
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior, U. 8.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho, June
1. 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Lee E
Ream, of Dingle, Idaho, who on April
27th, 1914, made Homestead Entry
No. 016912 WH 8E34. NE% SW34
SV4 NE34. SE*4 NW34 and Lots 2
and 3, Section 5, Township 16 South,
Range 45 East, Boise Meridian, has
filed notice of intention tb make
Three Year Proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, United States Com
missioner, at Montpelier, Idaho, on
the 23th day of July, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
William R. Quayle, John H. Sparks.
Roy Lyons and JPrank Kibby, all of
Dingle, Idaho.
6-7-«t
J. T. CARRUTH,

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