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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, October 11, 1918, Image 4

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MONTPELIER EXAMINER
Published Every Friday
it
Is
if
C. B. WRIGHT. Editor sad Manager
Montpelier, Friday, October 11, 1918
REPUBLICAN STATE TICKET.
For United States Senator, (Long
Term,) William E. Borah.
For United- States Senator, (Short
Term,) Frank E. Gooding.
For Congress, Southern District, Ad
dison T, Smith.
For Governor, D. W. Davis.
For Lieutenant Governor,C. C. Moore.
For Secretary of State, R. O. Jones.
For State Auditor, Edward G. Gallet.
For State Treasurer, John W. Eagle
son.
For Attorney General, Roy L. Black.
For Superintendent of Public Instruc
tion, Ethel E. Redfield.
For Inspector of Mines, Robert N.
Bell.
REPUBLICAN COUNTY TICKET.
For State Senator, A .A. Hart.
For State Representative, Fred C.
Evans.
For Commissioner, First District, E.
M. Allred.
For Commissioner, Second District,
Charles Nate.
For Commissioner, Third District, Si
las L. Wright.
For Clerk of District Court and ex
officio Auditor and Recorder, Fran
cis M. Winter.
For Sheriff, John J. Jones.
For Treasurer, Arthur T. Pendrey.
For Probate Judge, John H. Grlm
mett.
For Supt. of Schools, Oliver C. Dun
ford.
For Assessor, James Dunn.
For Prosecuting Attorney, David C.
Kunz.
For Coroner, Frank M. Williams.
SPECIES OF FRIGHTFULNESS
As the spread of the scourge call
ed the Spanish influenza goes on
with its alarming rapidity one's mem
ory goes back to the summer of 1916
when infantile paralysis swept espe
cially the lower districts of New York
city and from there spread through
out the entire country. And when it
was finally whlspbred about that the
epidemic was another demonstration
of German hate, the product of a mil
itary autocracy that could look far
enough into the future to desire to
bring harm to future generations in
the United States, the people could
scarcely believe that Prussian sol
diers hacked Belgian babies to pieces.
After thousands of children had
died American secret service agents
learned that the germs of infantile
paralysis had been isolated in Germa
ny. They knew that if it was possi
ble to isolate the germ, then it also
was possible to spread the disease by
artificial means. If it was possible
to do such a terrible thing the secret
service knew that Germany at least
must be trying to do it.
Then began a series of investiga
tions, and it was learned that a cer
tain physician had come to America
from Germany and that he was re
ceiving money from the German gov
ernment. It was also discovered that
blue-bottle flies were placed in bits of
germ culture and then turned loose
in the crowded tenement districts of
New York. The blue-bottle flies did
the rest—the plague was spreading
at a terrible rate. But before the
secret service could round up its tacts
Fate intervened. The German doctor
became Inoculated with the germ and
died in the frightful agony that he
had brought upon countless Innocent
children. Then the plague began to
HOUSEWIVES:
You Can Own an Eden Easily!
' Here is
How
to pay for it:
You make a
small pay
ment at time
contract is
signed, then
pay a small
payment on
each month
until paidfor
Absolutely Free, 3 Plans:--6, 12 or 18 months in which to pay
The Eden Washer is sold only under a liberal guarantee.
It should last a life time under reasonable care. It is the
one recommended by Good Housekeeping Institute and is
the highest developed Washer sold.
V*
This is
,.How:
just get hub
by to do this
once and let
us send the
Eden Wash
er Demon
strator so he
can use it the
next time.
ii
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The Idaho Electric Company
die down, proving conclusively that
the physician was the sole cause of It.
And even now It Is more than a
suspicion that the Spanish influença
that is sweeping the United States,
that Is killing thousands of the brave
boys In the cantonments, is not the
Spanish lnfluenaa, but another Ger
man scourge, made in Germany and
especially distributed throughout the
United Sûtes in an attempt to mur
der and destroy our soldiers and our
morale before our men get on the
other side. This germ also has been
isolated In Germany and can be pro
duced whenever they desire, and that
it is really, to use an unscientific
word, a composite germ, produced by
the grippe germ and pneumonia
germ. Almost unefringly pneumonia
Is created by the pneumonia qualities
of this composite germ. Another spe
cies of Hun frightfulness which no
doubt would burn at the stake every
man, woman and child in the world,
if that would enable them to win this
war.
Isn't it awful even to believe that
such Inhuman monsters can exist in
the form of human beings as these
Germans are showing themselves to
be?
CHARACTER.
parttes were flirting for the Townley i
At a time when politicians in both
endorsement, when D. W. Davis, the
republican candidate for governor
had good reason to know that both
Senator Borah in the republican par
ty and Senator Nugent in the demo
cratic party were making strong bids
for such endorsement, Mr. Davis re
fused to consider it. In his letter to
Chairman Taylor refusing to be re
corded as the silent recipient of such
endorsement he wrote him:
not recall a time when I have been
persuaded to compromise on convic
tions that I did not regret it," and
then refused to be even in a receptive j
'I can
:
P athieB are wlth the farmer and had
he ,>een agaured in h,a own m<nd
. ,
mood for such endorsement "br !
Townley, Coats and others at the
head of it."
Mr. Davis has been a true friend
of the farmer. As a banker at Amer
ican Falls he developed through farm
loans a great wheat belt and helped
as much as any individual in his
community to make Power ' county
known to fame as the great produc
ing wheat belt of the state. His sym
that the non-partisan league was a
farmers' organization and that poli
ticians were not exploiting the far
mer for their own selfish purposes
through the non-partisan league he
would have taken a different stand,
than the on« he took. / ]
Mr. Davis, at a time when it looked.
to him as it did evidently to others
that a non-partisan league endorse-1
ment was an asset, did not yield
to the temptation of such an endorse-jot
ment, because he would not sacrifice
his principles in the matter even if it
cost him the ambition of being gov

ernor.
By this action Mr. Davis showed
hitbself a man, a man who can safely
be intrusted against temptation in of
fice, a man who will put principle
above the temporary advantage of the
moment, the sort of man Idaho needs
for governor at a time when politi
cal expediency has reduced the moral
fiber of many men.
If the state needed an .exhibition of
Mr. Da via' true character they got i*
here.—Sandpoint Review.
T
FARMER« ASKED TO HAVE
PATIENCE IN WHEAT MOVING
An appeal has been sent to farmers
from Herbert Hoover, national food!
administrator, asking that patience:
be shown in the matter of moving the
great wheat crop, Inferring that there
Is good news behind it. The progress
on the western front has demanded a
diversion of grain ships for the aid of
General Pershing, whose demands in
combatting with the retiring Huns are
becoming much enlarged.
Mr. Hoover wishes the farmers to
understand that the diverting of the
grain ships is temporarily curtailing
the wheat movement from the sea
board and has filled the seaboard and
terminal elevators to capacity, thus
checking the movement of grain. He
urges that there is no need of farmers
selling their wheat at less than gov
ernment price, if the holders will have
a little patience, and that the wheat
will shortly be moved and the full
price secured by every grower.
Not only in Idaho, but elsewhere
farmers have become worried over
the movement of the grain to the
terminal markets, even to the entent
that the wheat might almost become
a drug on the market, not under
standing that every grain that has
ripened in the wheat fields is precious
in winning the war. Mr. Hoover evi
denUy wtBh es It understood that the
government wants the farmers' wheat
but.at present everything must give
way towards rushing men and ammu
nitions to Pershing and the boys in
khaki, who are winning the war.
TO PREVENT CON
TAGIOUS DISEASE
lgjtlike the duty of the citizens and
the health authorities. Neither can
, succeed without the co-operation of
the other. By thèir combined faithful
discharge of the obligations renting
upon them, many lives may be saved
and much suffering prevented. No
fact is better established than that
contagious diseases may be positively
prevented by means of the restriction
and destruction of the germs, which
are the sole cause, and the practical
methods by which this may be accom
plished are quarantine and disinfec
tion.
Owing to the numerous cases of
Spanish influenza throughout our
state, the Board of Health have clos
ed the city schools, churches, Sunday
schools, theatres, moving picture
houses, ward meetings, dance halls,
private dances, pool halls,card rooms,
social gatherings of all kinds, and all
public gatherings of any kind or na
ture.
A Btrlct quarantlne wl „ he enforc _
] ed and the Board of Health ask the
support and co-operation of all cltl
ze "? 8 untH tht * epidemic is stamped
Dated ^ #th dfty q( Qct m#>
By order of Board of Health City
Montpelier,
»
out.
GEO. F. ASHLEY, Chairman.
C. H. TOOMER.
J. G. MERRILL.
M. B. CHERRY.
Approved by City Council October
9th, 1918.

R. N. SNEDDON, Mayor.
To Our Friends and Customers.
Our stock of fall and winter goods
has been selected with the greatest;
possible care In order to gve the traeje ■
•.he best possible values. Merchandise
Is very scarce and we advise our cus
tomers to cover their wants Just as
iarly as possible.
H. B. WHITMAN.
:
8
I
Coats
• ••
\
We take a great deal of pride •
in our showing of Ladies' and
Misses' Coats, for it is the re
sult of searchingfor the best in
the markets. For the children we
have a number of very attractive
models to select from. Here there
is ample choice in style and quality
appealing to every taste and price.
An early inspection is advisable.
Brennan & Davis
*
TWO BEAR LAKE BROTHERS
DRIVING HUNS TO COVER.
Below are photographs of the two
sons of MrB. Mary E. Sorensen of
Liberty, who are now serving their
country In France. One of the sons
enlisted soon after war was declared
against Germany, and when the other
son was called under the draft early
last fall, Mrs. Sorensen, with true
American spirit, did not ask exemp
tion for him, although he was her
only remaining support on the ranch,
requesting only that he be left at
home until the year's crops were har
vested.
»
s=
i

Ivan, who is 20 years old, enlisted
on April 18, 1917. He is no ( w with
a coast artillery regiment in France.
I
Cbsuncey is 28 years old. He left
tor Camp Lewis on Oct. 3, 1917, and
in Just three months from that date
he landed in France. He is a member
of Company A,Second Military Police.
FARMERS SHOULD HAVE
GRAIN PROPERLY GRADED
State Grain Inspector R. J. Leth is
responsible for the statement that
there are very few grain Arms in the
state who have the necessary equip
ment for properly grading wheat. In
most-cases neither the farmer nor
the dealer is assured of the correct
grade. The. farmer is not the only los
er in this game, however.
Much
wheat is purchased on too high a
I grade and the dealer stands the loss.
Possibly such losses and gains may
I compensate for each other to the deal
Br, but not so to the individual far
COMMISSIONERS' PROCEEDINGS.
The board of county commissioners met at ten o'clock a. m. this 9th da;
of September, 1918, pursuant to law, for the purpose of fixing the levies oi
the taxable property within the county for the year 1918.
Present: Ezra E. Howell, chairman, John T. Petersmi
ans, commissioners, H. H. Broomhead, clerk and D. C. Kunz, county prose
cuting attorney, and the following proceedings were had, to-wit:
In the matter of fixing the levies for the year 1918 for raising revenu
for state and county purposes:
It appearing to the board that the assessed valuation of Bear Lai
ecounty as shown by the Assessment Roll after equalization by the Stat
Board of Equalization is..
Exemptions allowed by law amount to.
Leaving a net valuation of....
As compared to the year 1917...^_
and Fred C. Ev
98 , 260,21
189,21
-»8,071,001
7,866,311
An increase for the year 1918 of_
It is therefore ordered that the following levies be and they are hereb
fixed according to law on all property subject to taxation in Bear Lake cour
ty. Idaho, levied on each One Dollar of assessed valuation :
1918 . 1917
2.7 mills total *21,792. 2.1 mills total *17,30
3 mills total 40,356. 4.5 mills total 36,39
4 mills total 32,284. 3.5 mills total 27,63
4 mills total 32,284. 4 mills total 31,46
Sinking and Bond Int..0.7 mills total 6,660. 0.1 mills total
* 204,69
State account .
Current Expense Act
General Schools .
Road and Bridge.....
6,92
*132,365.15
EZRA J. HOWELL, Chairma
Totals
Attest: H. H. BROOMHEAD, Clerk
16.4
*117,99
mere. State grading is the only re
course.
Mr. Leth further stated that bet
ter service could be given if the rules
for submitting wheat samples were
always followed. A common difficul
ty is the submission of too small a
sample. Three pintB is the smallest
sample it is possible to grade.
The grade determined by the
State Grain Inspector becomes bind
ing - on both buyer and seller only
when the sample is Jointly selected by
them.
The law demands that a sample be
submitted for the official state grade
upon demand of either party con
cerned.
State wheat grading assures every
farmer of the proper grade on his
wheat if he so desires. Likewise it
protects the dealer from unknow
ingly buying wheat at a higher grade
than is justified.
STOCK RANCH FOR
8AL.fi BY OWNER.
One hundred and
seventy-five
acres, mostly Bear river bottom, Irri
gated, sheep tight fenced, fair im
provements; one mile to Bordér sta
tion; 10 miles north of Cokeville;
opportunity to buy adjoining land if
desired; will also sell 8 cattle, *
mares, 176 fine grade Cottswold
ewes, machinery and tools; *1,000
cash, balance on* time at 6 per cent
Address E J.. ENECK,
Cokeville, Wyo.
DR.BAYLIFF
is
In
■ ' n
EYE SPECIALIST

A Year's Treatment
In All Cases.
Office in Ritor Bros. Block.
Honrs from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
every dav except Mondav.
PhOVK—216-W
a
v
The Presbyterian cburch expect!
the soon arrival of Rev. George Mel
Dowell, of Lake Point, Mo., to bel
come the perronanent pastor of thl
church. He is a western man, well
versed in western ways and methl
ods, and besides a great preacher!
He was formerly stationed In some of!
the largest Presbyterian churches oft
Wyoming and will prove tobe a great]
Wyoming and will prove to be a great
doer of things on this field.
FOR RENT.—Modern house on Main
street; apply to A.. Br Gough.
BUCKS FOR SALE. f
Forty-four good grade, early
Cottswold buck lambs, *22.60 if tak
en soon, as I am crowded for room.
Come see them 10 miles north of
Cokeville.— E. J. Eneck.
A Beautiful Woman.
Do you know that a beautiful
man always has a good digestion ? ft
your digestion is faulty, eat ligAtly
of meats, and take an occasions* - dose
of Chamberlain's Tablets to strength
en your digestion. Price
The Examiner is only *2 a year.
wo
Shelltex Shur-on
at the front
THE RIMS PRÈVEN1
LENS BREAKAGE'
t
Dr. Chilton will be In Montpeli
on Oct. 21. 22. 23, 24 and 26; off.
at Goodman ft Christman's Jewelry
Oct/aV*** St,lck, hoB10 I» Parte

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