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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, December 06, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1918-12-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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McADOO'K RETIREMENT
WAS UNEXPECTED.
Washington, Nov. 30.—The abdi
cation of Mr. McAdoo is almost as
startling as that of the Kaiser, and
much less expected. Outside the pres
ident, Mr. McAdoo has been the most i
influential man in the American gov
ernment. Friends and foes alike wil
lingly admit that "McAdoo is a won
der." The president undoubtedly
was right when he wrote in his letter
accepting the resignation, that Mr.
McAdoo was the greatest secretary of
treasury in history. On the fact of
the correspondence, and for the infor
mation of the public, Mr. McAdoo
gave up his place In Washington in
order to "recoup his personal for
tunes." When a man has the the
strings to pull that will haul down a
hundred thousand dollars a year as
against a salary of ten thousand for
looking after the biggest administra
tive Job in Washington, it is not
strange that in his grandfather days,
coupled with the possession of a
beautiful and wonderful young wife
and a comparatively new baby, that
the mind should turn to the problem
of laying by nest eggs as against the
days of "sans eyes, sans teeth," etc.
Mr. McAdoo undoubtedly quit for the
very reasons that he gave—and If It
had not been for the "other reasons"
It Is likely that the original "reasons"
might not have resulted In this sensa
tiodhl exit from political life.
to
of
a
A good deal of newspaper discus
sion and speculation has taken place
since Mr. McAdoo resigned, and one
paper that has called the turn on
events time and again, declares that
Mr. McAdoo has never been a public
ownership man, and that his views
have "brought him into continuous
and acrimonious discussion with Mr.
Wilson and some of his fellow-cabinet
members on the subject of the future
At least two other
of the railroads.'
members of the cabinet are In the
frame of mind as that credited
same
to Mr. McAdoo, and men within ad
ministration circles believe that in
this attitude the insurgents are sup
ported by Colonel House, whom the
political gossipers insist reached the
parting of the ways with Mr. Burle
son several months ago.
This last bit of Information is al
most equal in political imptv'.ance to
the McAdoo resignation, so far as It
affects the issue of politics surround
ing government ownership, for Colo
nel House "made Burleson," In the
common expression of Washington.
Congress Will Resume Its Functions.
As straws show which way the wind
blows, the Washington political gos
sip, which 1; unquestionably correct,
shows that the democratic party is
not going to surrender itself to the
championship of the socialistic doc
trines of Mr. Burleson and some oth
er political leaders, without a big
fight. Government operation of the
railroada, wire lines, etc., has been
Justified as war measures, and they
were accepted by congresa without
much protest. But congress is likely
THE UNIVERSAL CAR
There 's the same economy in using
the one-ton Ford truck that there is in
using the Ford car—only the larger
of the truck commends
__ - it partieulary to
TH© Truck farmers, and other
business men.
famous
motor assures reli
able power, and lots
of it; the manganese bronze worm drive
makes certain the uBe of all that power;
the three-point suspension gives flexi
bility, and vanadium steel strength.
Price, without body, $550 f.o.b. Detroit.
carrying power
:
:
The
That
Model T
Trucks
RUAT? LAKE MOTOR COMPANY.
Ford Authorized Sale and Service.
Montpelier, Idaho.
I
to assume the responsibility of pass
ing upon these issues as a matter of
permanent policy, and if there is half
the "pride in reconstruction" that is
indicating itself on the surface, the
legislative branch of the government
will determine the fate of the rail
roads, wire lines, etc., in its Own
way. irrespective of the cabinet, or
perhaps even the president, if the lat
ter chooses to take a hand. Congress
is pretty near the point of hoisting
the red flag against the method of
"cabinet legislation," that has been
sent up to the Hill for Okeh.
The probability that Colonel
House, Mr. McAdoo, and some of the
cabinet members oppose government
ownership, shows that the democratic
party is not likely to become commit
ted in its entirety to government
ownership. On the other side of the
political arena stands the republican
organization, made up almost entirely
of opponents of government owner
ship.
The great economic and industrial
Issues involved In government own
ership do not lend themselves readily
to partisan political Juggling, and
when men like Mr. McAdoo qujt there
are grounds to believe that the dem
ocratic party will not swallow the
new doctrine, hook, sinker and bob
ber, without a pretty careful amouni
of investigation of the bait.
Better Roads.
In providing work for discharged
soldiers and sailors and munition
workers, road building offers a solu
tion of many problems. The United
States as a whole is behind most for
eign countries in the matter of good
highways. Poor roads are a reason
for high prices of farm produce in
many eases. They are a reason why
more automobiles are not purchased
and used. They are a reason for
heavy upkeep cost of vehicles of all
kinds. They are a cause for many
accidents. They are a hindrance to
suburban and country development;
a cause of low prices of real estate in
country sections; a reason, in short,
for slower development of national
Industry and production than should
be expected of a country as progress
ive as ours claims to be.
Colonel Robert H. Tyndall of the
160th field artillery, U S. army, writ
ing from France says;
be a couple of million real road war
boosters when the war is over." He
speaks in glowing terniB of the splen
did highways they found in France
comparing them much to the detri
ment with the average highway found
in the United States.
"There will
Stomach Trouble.
"Before I used Chamberlain's Tab
lets 1 doctored a great deal for stom
ach trouble and felt neavous and tir
ed all the time. These tablets helped
me from the first, and inside of a
week's time I had improved in every
way," writes Mrs. L. A. Drinkard,
Jefferson City, Mo.
It is as hard for a woman to keep
money as it is for her to keep a secret.
RED CROSS RECEIPTS
AND DISBURSEMENTS
heart
Rev.
at
He
late
ward
the
G. C. Gray, treasurer of Bear Lake
Chapter .American Red Cross, submits
the following report covering the pe
riod from Dec. 14. 1917, to Nov. 30,
1918:
Received from former trea
surer
$ 901.18
Received from all sources. 6,180.78
. *7,081.96
Total receipts—
Disbursements.
Bear Lake County merch
ants supplies--—
Red Cross at Seattle.
Factories, etc-
Canteen work..
Quayle and Davis, purchas
ing committee.
Freight and small items.
Relief soldiers' wife..
ate
ed
be
and
»2,172.61
3,226.47
431.85
203.60
200.00
142.61
37.16
in
*6,415.09
* 668.87
Total disbursements.
Balance on hand
as
U. 8. MUHT SUPPLY EUROPE
WITH CATTLE AND HOGH
Ogden, Nov. 30.—Belief that a
lively demand for hogs, cattle and
sheep—and particularly for hogs—
will continue is expressed by live
That
stock men and meat packers,
belief is substantiated by the reports
from all parts of America and from
Europe, the latter showing that there
has been such a decrease in the num
ber of domestic animals of all kinds
that the farms, ranches and ranges
of the United States must be depend
ed upon for more than a year to sup- j
ply this deficiency.
Farmers of Europe will be unable j
to build up their herds and flocks dur- ;
in
for
all
to
in
the
war
He
ing the coming year to anywhere near j
normal conditions. Even with no r -j
mal conditions, Europe was importing j
large quantities of meat frtjm Amer-|
tea. This makeB it apparent that, as j
Europe will demand a greater meat I a
supply, the year 1919-20 will not see ,
the time that meats are not In great]
demand.
that there will be a splendid market [
Demand for meats means
for livestock.
With the end in view of assuring I
the greatest production of hogs, meat |
packers have agreed upon a plan for I
stabilizing of the price, this plan be- i
lng approved by the United States j
Food Administration. The result is
that the livestock men are assured
continued high prices, while they are j
also assured lower cost of produc- j
tlon, through the fact that, with food
rules applying to grain entirely re-|
voked, there will be more opportun!- 1
ty to feed and fatten hogs, cattle and j
sheep. Premature marketing of hogs j
bringing a flood of business that j,
could not be handled by packing
houses might endanger this plan ofj
buying at a stabilized price, but it la
the belief that the very fact of sta- j
billty will assure the livestock raisers |
of the intermountain country that;
they ought to hold their stock until I
it is thoroughly fattened and thus j
gain the extra profit coming from the |
feeding of their hogs.
will
Tab
tir
a
keep
HEART FAILURE CAUSES
DEATH OF BISHOP KÜNSTEN i
_
Boise, Dec. 2.—A sudden attack of
heart failure caused the death of Rt.
Rev. James Bowen Funsten, first
Protestant Episcopal bishop of Idaho.
shortly after midnight this morning :
at his home, 120 West Idaho street. ;
He retired apparently in good health •
late in the evening but shortly after- 1
ward was found in bed stricken and
beyond medical aid. He died before
the family physician could arrive.
Mrs. Funsten if the only immedi
ate member of the family at home.
Their five children have been notifi
ed and no funeral arrangements will
be made'until they are heard from.
Four sons, William, Robert. James
and Stannard are in the service of
work for the United States j
their country and their daughter.
Miss Elise Is in Washington engaged
in war
shipping borfrd.
The death of Bishop Funsten came
as a shock. It was so unexpected. He
will be mourned by many. He was
apparently In usual good health Sun
day and conducted Thanksgiving ser
vice at St. Michael's cathedral Sunday
and In the afternoon held the regular
service for the staff and training
school at St. Luke's hospital. Many
people, especially members of the
church saw and talked with him on
that day.
j ea th, therefore, was fartherest from
j
;
Bishop Funsten was an unusually
robust man, whose fine physique and
carriage gave him the appearance of
being in the very best of health, and
the minds of those who knew him.
Rise* In ('hurt'll Rapidly.
Bishop Funsten was born in 1856
j |n Clark county Virginia,
r -j year8 of age . In 1875 Bishop Funs
j t#n graduat€d from the Virginia Mili
tury Instltute In i 87g he was award
as j ed h , 8 LL B by that univergtty . p-or
I a j ew years thereafter he practiced
, (aw and then entered the Virginia
He was 62
j,
j
|
I
j
|
A necessity
A
Good baking powder Is essential to
all households, especially the brand
that proved Its unusual efficiency
when so many experimental fluors
were in use.
IÏ]
I hi'
MÏÏW
Orescent linking Powder meets every
demand. It Is safe because it keeps
longer and never falls to raise any
dough perfectly.
(B-S21)
Mike laughed
at the Judge 1
151
fir's!
for chewing Gravely.
The Judge came right
back at Mike with a friend
ly chew—just a couple of
little squares off his plug of
Real Gravely.
Mike found thatthechew
stayed with him for a long
while, and the more he
chewed the better it tasted.
'There's the real tobac
co satisfaction," says the
Judge: "and it costs noth
ing extra to chew this class
of plug.
j
II
It pn further—that's why you
run get the good tout» of this class
of toheuco without ostra cost.
PEYTON BRAND
Real Gravely Chewing Plug
each piece packed in a pouch
I ■ ■ 111 in it 11111 rr ra i I im I il 11—
Edwin L. McCLave
W. H. Smith
If You Want to Buy a
HOME
:
:
a farm or a lot to build on, we have some
that are very cheap and some that can be
had on very easy terms. WHY PAY
RENT.
We sell Life, Health and Accident, Fire
and Automobile Insurance, that is relia
ble.
We have money to loan on irrigated or
part irrigated land at 8 per cent, no com
mission charged.
Invest in real estate and see it grow in
value. Montpelier is the place to invest.
Buy insurance and let the other fellow
worry. Come in and talk it over and see
if we can't save you some money.
I
BEAR RIVER VALLEY LANO & ABSTRACT CO
j
Theological seminary from which he
His advance
graduated in 1882.
ment in the church was rapid. In
1882 he was a deacon and in 1883 he
made a priest of the Protestant
From 1882 to
was
Episcopal church.
1884 he held the pastorate of the,
Episcopal church at Bristol, Tenn. |
From 1884 to 1890 he was rector of!«
Christ church, Richmond, Va., and |
from 1890 to 1892 he was general
missionary in Virginia. From 1892
to 1899 he was rector of the Episco
pal church at Portsmouth, Va. In
1898 he was elected first missionary
bishop of Boise, Later he was nam
ed bishop in charge of Wyoming and
in 1907 was elected the first bishop
of Idaho, a position he held in the
church until his sudden death.
For Croup.
"Chamberlain's Cough Remedy Is
splendid for croup," writes Mrs. Ed
j ward Hassett, Frankfort, N. Y. "My
children have been quickly relieved of
attacks of this dreadful complaint by
its use." This remedy contains no
opium or other narcotic, and may be
given to a child as confidently as to
an adult.
Herb is the
WELCOME DINNER (
BEL.L- THAT '
ALL FOLKS LOVE
TO HEAR SOWELL ■'
*..7*
-
DON'T YOU LIKE TO
HEAR THE DINNER BELL
ringing when there's a choice,
savory, full-fiavored roast or
steak awaiting you? Or per
haps you're fond of a nice
thick chop? In any event you
should make this market your
meat headquarters.
H. H. HOFF MEAT CO.
C'AIT- 1>E UMAR D>K8
IN NEW YORK HOSPITAL
«
New York.—Captain Joseph Ra
phael De Lamar, financier and mine
owner, died Sunday in Roosevelt hos- ¥
pltal of pneumonia which developed
He was 75 yean
| after an operation,
1 « 1 Captain De Lamar p
| dent of the °™ e ne9 company,
vice president of the Internatonal
Nickle companj an a rec or n
many other corporations,
The atory of Capta n amar s
»1« reads like a romance He was
born in Amsterdam, Holland, and
while yet a mere boy boarded a Dutch
vessel that plied to the West Indies
and worked as a sailor until he was
23. when he became master of a ship.
He then came to America and set
tled at Vineyard Haven, Mass. When
the gold fever struck LeadviUe, Colo.,
In 1878, De Lamar went west and
bought several claims. The same
he took a course in chemistry
year
and metallurgy in Chicago university.
Moving to Idaho he purchased the De
Lamar mines which he sold two years
later to London interests for *2,000,
He was the sole owner of the
000 .
Utah Mines and Smelting company.
In 1884 Captain De Lamar entered
politics and was elected state senator
of Idaho. He came to New York city
in 1898 and was known In Wall street
as "the man of mystery."
At his country home at Glencove,
Captain De Lamar entertained visi
tors from all over the world who
came to see his collection of plants
and flowers.
He Is survived by a daughter, who
is a member of the Red Cross Motor
corps.
During the courtship the man tells
her he can't live without her, but
after marriage he often discovera that
he can't can't live with her.
The Examiner ta only 18 a year.
John Black
W
agent for Singer Sewing
machines. Full line of sup
plies always on hand. Sec
ond-hand machines taken
in exchange for new ones.
. . -'Phone 153-J
Und:
THE VINCENT TURN. 00.
Undertaking and Embalming
a Specialty
Licensed Embalmer
j
■o«ae Mum M
Phone M
The
Nielsen Furniture Co«
Handles a Nice Line of
Undertaking Goods
Phone 21
H. H. KINO, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon
BURGEON O. 8. L. BY.
Offloa over First National Bank
Offtea Phon« 111
Residence Phono Hi
Idaho
MontpeUer
GEO. F.ASHLEY
Physician and Surgeon
MONTPELIER, IDAHO
Offlco hours: I« to IS; S to 4; 1 to •
Offlco at MontpoUer Hoopttal
Phones 62 and 63
All Calla Given Prompt Attention
HARRY V. FLYNN
DENTIST
Twelve Y Mrs Practice In Chlenco
Parlors fas Brennan * Davis Bid«.
Hours: t to Ui and 1 to 4
OFFICE PHONE NO. 40
Graduated hi Europe and Unite 1
Staten f
OBce Phone 184
nmeu Over Ranh of Montpelier
Hours » to II; 1 tn t
ZJ
j
Rm. Phone If*

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