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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, January 10, 1919, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1919-01-10/ed-1/seq-5/

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Make Sale
Investments
The protection of princi
ple should be the first consider*
ation of every inveetor. But it's not
always an easy matter for the ordinary
investor to determine the safety of the
issues offered him.
The character of an invest
k ment, however, is usually A
reflected in the concern
which offers it. Invest
tnents offered through
« this institution war
rant your confidence.
1
Safety— Honesty —Courtesy—Service
The First National Bank
IDAHO
MONTPELIER,
Member Regional Reserve Bank
on
T
T
Local News
Montpelier, Friday, January 10, 1919
The stork left a daughter at the
home of Lorento Swensen last Tues
day.
Mrs. Sam Lewis and daughter Lil
lian went to Salt Lake Wednesday
for a week's visit.
We are now offering all winter
hats at a big reduction.—Paris Mil
linery, Hotei Burgoyne block.
The stork paid its first visit to the
home of George Eulburg last night
and left a son.
A daughter registered at the home
of J. B. Tueller last night. They
now have thrée little queens at the
Tueller home.
George J. Hoff of Georgetown, and
Zelma Matbisan of Montpelier, were
united In marriage in Salt Lake last
Wednesday.
Pure life insurance protection at
reasonable cost; see 8. N. Kuns,
Montpelier; phone 323.
While coasting Wednesday a ten
year-old son of Arnold Eschler ran
into a wire fence and sustained sever
al deep and painful cuts about the
neck and face.
Mrs. R. H. Earl haa located in the
,. . ._. . , . „ „
city and would be pleased to take a
few pupils in voice cult "^ e al l?
ano. She haa studied under Profs.
Hand and McClelland of Salt Lake.
We still have a good assortment
of ladies' winter hats which we are
offering at a big reduction in order
to close them out.—Paris Millinery,
Hotel Burgoyne block.
Ivan Loveday was sent to the L. D.
8. hospital at Salt Lake Wednesday
morning with a broken shoulder
blade. The accident happened while
he was at work In the shops.
A son of M. Sorensen of Ovid, had
his left leg badly lacerated Tuesday
while coasting. A sharp stick,
which was protruding from the
snow, penetrated the flesh and tore It
badly. •
Seymour Hoff of Georgetown, who
has been I« the service of Uncle 8am
for the past 15 months at Vancou
ver, Wash., returned home Wednes
day, having been mustered out of
servie«.
Mose Lewis went to Logan last
Sunday to spend several days looking
after his business affairs there. He
will go to Salt Lake before returning
home to attend to some business and
personal affairs.
A lady's old black hand bag was
It contained a
left at thia office,
silk handkerchief, a ten cent piece
and some other articles; owner can
have same by calling, proving prop
erty and paying for this notice.
When you yut to make a date
with the chiropractor, phone 57; calls
made afternoon* and evening*.—O.
B. Parrott, chiropractor.
Dr A L. Chilton of the Pocatello
Optical Co will be at his office In
Goodman A Christman's Jewelry
store Jan. 27, 2$, 29 and 30 snd Feb.
J and at the Stuck! home in Paris
from 10 a. m. to 3 p. m.. Jan. 31, If
quarantine will permit.
Joe Einzlnger. with a detachment
of overseas patients, arrived at the
army hospital at Fort Douglas Wed
nesday. He will be muttered out
from his condi
- -'",-4,, wi
* well known young people. wercunU'
A T* ** "IJ^ehfs^^deUdous
» a* J%3
geons
's
a
A large number of men and teams
from Star valley have been noticed
on our streets this week, which re
minds us of times before the out
break of the flu epidemic, and which
also reminds us that any furthei; pro
hibition of public gatherings, schools
included. Is without necessity in fact.
At an early hour on New Year's
morn the stork paid its first visit to
the home of Mr. and Mra. Frank Wy
att of Champaign, 111., and left a lit
tle daughter. A recent letter from
there stated that the moher and babe
were doing nicely. Mrs. Wyatt was
formerly Misa Genevieve Hoff of this
city.
Tom Hartman arrived home Wed
nesday from Camp Lee. Va., where he
bad been for a couple of months. He
waa mustered Out at Camp Dodge.
Elisha and Charlie Strong went
to Evanston this morning to attend
tbe funeral of their sister, Effle, who
died there yesterday. She was 70
years of age.
The late Wm. R. Roberts- of Salt
Lake and J. E. Simmons of Sods
Springs, both carried Insurance in
the Modern Woodmen of America,
tbe former $1,000 and the latter
$3,000. Last week Harry Hull, clerk
of the order in Montpelier, received
checks In payment of theae policies
and they were forwarded to the re
spective beneficiaries.
George Koford and family returned
last week from Portland, where they
had been tor the pa8t flve months.
Mr. Koford worked In the ship yards
a
there up to the time the war ended.
Since then there has been but little
doing in tbp yards and aa there waa
no work in other linea he decided to
return to Montpelier and he aaya that
he is glad to get back.
Mrs. O. H. Groo went to Laramie
Wednesday to visit for a couple of
weeks at thp home of her son, Hayes.
"Dad" Bryan received a welcome
message Wednesday morning from
hla son. Bates, announcing his safe
arrival from overbeaa. Bates stated
that he would be detained for de
mobilization for a couple of weeks,
but that he would be at home Just
am soon as he could get here after be
ing mustered out of service.
Rev. J. O. A. Martin returned Wed
nesday from Boise where he went
last week upon being Informed of the
Illness of Mrs. Martin, who is still ill
though Improved. He stopped over
at Pocatello on hla return trip to vis
it a married daughter,
standing there are a large number of
cases of influença in both Boise and
Pocatello, the ban on pnblle meetings
and gatherings are lifted with no ap
parent danger of the spread of the
disease, he reports.
Charley Cheney returned Wednes
day from an auto trip to Star valley.
Charlie said there nothing unusual
■boqt making an auto trip to that
section, but he d om claim that It la
unusual to make the drive in an auto
Notwith
ton last Sunday la Just two hoars and
, thirty-five
In turn trip Wednesday to two hoars
and fifty-five minutes He was delay
by meeting tea
If
section haa experienced for a aum
her of years. There have been win
. ters when we had colder weather
Urn* that of the ***~°*'^**'£*
the 10 th of last month the thermo»
ssr srsstrs: rts iî
wÏÏnLtoy nlghuôf
this week It wes 12 below. The
«GS|»vkh?
murjtably abort time In which he
made it. He drove from here to At-
futiles, and made the rw-
mi fully fifteen minutes earning home
We have had more steady cold
weather the past month than this
lira. Mom Low ta lêR'foV salt Taka
this mors Inc upon receipt of a ■»
saxe that her husband was under
'quarantine, haring contracted the
flu atnce leaving here tor Logan and
Salt Lake on a business trip.
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Kuna went to
Salt Lake Monday morning to attend
the funeral of the latter's brother.
Frank L. Brown, who died at Char
lotte. N. C-, on Jan. 1st. Death was
caused from pneumonia. Mr. Brown
had been In charge of the JoMph
Smith memorial farm at South Royml
ton. Vermont, for the past eight
years, and had only recently left Ver
mont to spend the winter In the
south. They were accompanied hy
M'.as Josephine Tribbs, sister of Mrs.
Kuns. They wlU return from Salt
tomorrow.
The Montpelier second hand store
buys, trades. Mils and repairs furni
ture.
OFFICERS NAB ALTO AND
BIO QUANTITY OF BOOZE
Last Tuesday Sheriff Athay and
Chief of Police Hinter located about
fourteen cases of "perfectly good
boose" which hsd been cached a
couple of mllee north of town. The
boose was the property of three men
who were taking It from Kemmerer
to Soda Springs and other points in
Bannock county. The Oral clue thut
led to the discovery of the boose was
a disabled auto, which was found
Just at the south edge of town on
Monday. When cloeely examined by
the offleera there was s strong smell
of boose about the car which bore a
Wyoming number. When the ear
broke down tone time Sunday night,
tba men hired tome one to convey the
boose to the point, where It was
found by the officers. Monday morn
ing two of tbe men—Carey and Sten
sen —returned to Kemmerer, while
the third man—Johnson—went to
Lava presumably to get some one
there to come after the boose in a car.
When he returned to Montpelier
Tuesday night on No. 4 he was taken
into custody by the officers. He ad
mitted that he was an occupant of
the boose laden car when It broke
down, but denied having a financial
interest in the boose. He gave the
officers the names of the other two
men and aald the car belonged to
Stensen. Neither he nor Csrey have
yet been apprehended.
The car has been confiscated by the
sheriff, and the owner will not only
lose his car, but his Interest In the
boose, of which the officers estimate
there is about $800 worth. The boose
's now under lock and key «some
where In Paris" and we presume that
in due time It wilt, by order of the
court, go gurgling down a sewer In
stead of the throats of some of the
good cltisens of Bannock county, who
would willingly have paid $3 or more
a pint for It, had the forbidden liquid
reached Us destination.
WILL DISCUSS QUESTION
OF OPENING THE HCHOOI/4
A public meeting will be held at
the city hall Monday night, Jan. 13,
at 7 :30 o'clock for the purpose of dis
cussing the question aa to whether
or not the public schools should be
opened. The doctors of the city end
the board of health will be present
and the patrons of the schools arc
urged to attend the meeting and
express themselves freely on the
question.
ONLY FOUR HOMES IN
CITY UNDER QUARANTINE
-
There are only four pomes under
quarantine In Montpelier this morn
ing. Yesterday two or three cases
of flu developed among the railroad
men and they ware taken to the
hospital. Charlie Hager la also a
flu patient there. All of the patients
have it in mild form. Conditions In
the county are also Improving, not a
death having occurred either In the
city or county during the past ten
days.
_$1.«6 yd.
~.$1.$( yd. I
It seems to us that condltlona In
the city are such that the board of
health would be Justified In raising
the ban on the picture show and the
churches. If It Is the Intention to
keep these places dosed until there
la not n case of flu in town, they will
be closed for the balance of the win
ter, if not for the next nix months.
CLEARANCE SALE.
A clearance sale that will tasks Its
mark supreme in value giving. You
are urged to attend while the selec
tions are complete,
and suits and misses' coats at less
than manufacturer's coat. We have
values that will stir the enthusiasm
of every dress goods buyer:
$1.00 dress goods for
$2.26 wool poplin for
$2.00 messeline and toffetta
Ladles' coat*
40c yd.
in all shades for
$1.1# yd 1
$2.60 taffettas in stripes
and plaidé for
THE FAIR STORE.
8am L. Lewis.
1 Take no chances, have none
but the best. DR. J. F. ALEX
am»». — «» «» «■«
h,s Personal attention at Hotel
Burgoyne Tuesday and Wed
sm*!ss»S£S,» "
Wait For
MIW"
E
I
I
11
2t*IW3t
Your Eyes Are
Precious.
FbiH HAVEN NOW.
F tab Haras. Jas. I.—Ths flu alt
uauon ta clearing up fcera ta flau I
shape Every home will be roleaasd 1
from quarantine today, except one
and It la not yet certain that the
I tuber* of this family hare the die
ease. There has been a good deal of
excitement la the neighboring towns
over the influente situation here.
Some of the towns hare gone so far
as to forbid any one from here going
into their villages, even to get a load
of hay. Others have called over the
phone to ask when certain parties
died and when they would be burled.
Still others state they were told that
there were SI families quarantined
and each family had an average of
four down with the dread disease.
Now the tacts of the matter are, we
never had but eight families under
quarantine with SI cases of colds and
nfluensa. There were only tour or
live of thia number who were at all
bad. While we think that people can
not be too careful about expos>ng
themselves to the Influents, still w>
lo not see the use of throw ng tht
vholn county into a panic "Just for
the tun there Is in It," and It would
be a good Idea tor other towns to
call up some one in Fish Haven and
-nak for a statement of the tacts be
fore they fly up in the air over noth
ing.
The following soldier boy* have
returned: Burns Erickson, Milford
Loveland, Daniel Curllaa, Richard
Nelson and John Vaterlaus. Othsrs
ars expected soon.
We have hsd but very little snow
hare but there Is plenty of fog. The
skating is good on ths lake but there
s now sleigh riding.
J. L. Gardner has moved to Logan
far the winter, and the home of U
von Gardner Is for sale as he has also
moved to Logan.
AH KB PERTI NENT Ql KHTIONB
■MODO- V BK IN FUH R
ABOUT
Bern, Jan. 7.—Editor Exam!nar:
The article you printed Jan. 8, HI*,
from the Montpelier Milling Co
seem* a very worthy one and one of
much Interest to both bread raisers
and bread usera. I am going to ask
you, Mr. Editor, for answer* to the
following, which I know will be of
much Interest to your readers and
especially to myself:
Is or is It not necessary to have s
certain amount of moisture In wheat
before a miller wilt try to grind ItT If
to, how much molature? Can he
have aa much or aa little moisture as
he may desire T
Can he have or doee ho have leas
molature In hard wheat when he
starts grinding than he has In soft
wheat?
Is or la It not true that when sack
ed at the mill a »8-lb. sack of hard
wheat flour haa Just aa much mola
ture In It aa does a t8-lb. sack of
«oft wheat flour?
After being aacked and while In
he sack will one kind of flour gain
more molature or lose more mois
ture or gain It taster or lose It fas
ter than does the other?
How many more pounds of water
can a baker put Into *8 pounds of
hard wheat flour. Ilk* ths Montpelier
Milling Co recommends then he can
out in a 98-lb. sack of all soft wheat
flour like the milling company does
:iot recommend?
I
I
ROBERT SCHMID.
ATTENTION, MR. FLOUR OON
SUMER.
- It occurs to the writer that a great
majority of the people do not appr
eciate ths vslue of hard wheat flour
aa against toft wheat flour.
The facta and figures In the matter
are this: One hundred pounds of
genuine hard wheat flour will maks
up at least ten loaves mora bread
than will 100 pounds of soft whaat
flour.
Ten loavea at 1$ cent* per
loaf. $1.$$.
We are not exaggerating at all
when we state that 100 pounds of the
tenuine hard wheat flour Is worth
$1.00 more to the consumer than 100 !
-rounds of soft wheat flour.
A baker's test this day proved be- ;
vot'd any question that the Turkey j
Red hard wheat flour manufactured i
by ths Montpelier Milling Co., will j
absorb 20 per cent more water In i
mixing the dough than soft wheat
lour.
The above mentioned teat waa
made by the Royal Bakery of this city
with the Montpelier Milling Co.'s Tur
key Red hard wheat flour and a soft
wheat floqr manufactured at Cache
Junction, dub, which was sold to
some of ths local dealers by an un
scrupulous agent, representing It to
I ha hard whaat flour.
Ths Montpelier mill has on hand a
very heavy stock of No. 1 hard wheat,
every bushel of which grades No. 1
hard and ars not using one bushel of
soft wheat In making flour.
Every sack is guarantoed to h#|
genuine or money refunded, A*k
1
When you ere rtosblod wMbtodt-
ter™*asr», , ÄS3s
ge-ti(m „ .rrompanlcd by
eonit'pstton and 1 * aggravated by II
■=
your grocer for a sack of the geu-
utoe Turkey Red and maka a test for
younelf, weighing flour, yssst and
water.
Why not buy a local product when
quality is best and actual coat maeh
Please eeeept our good wishes for
a Happy and Prosperous 1*1$.
Montpelier, Idaho, Jan, 1, 1*1$.
MONTPELIER M1LLINO CO.
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Put off" and "put off," next week, and next week,
and so it got» until some chance comes along and then you
■ay:—"Oh, if I only had the money now"—and tome oth
er fellow buy* the bargain, or the real estate and makes
money.
,•
Why don't you have a bank aocount and make It
grow so you'll be prepared for a good business chance?
COME TO OUR BANK
Bank of Montpelier
INCXmrORATKD 1*01
G. C. GRAY. FnsMest
RU HARB OHOO. CmMsp
RETURNED SOLDIERS
As a record to
snow the part you
have honorably
I played in the war
' for Liberty, your
in uni
y »
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^ portrait i
form. ■
Ths Rinehart Studio
I
KODAK MTOKK, MONTPELIER, IDA HO.
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Western Electric
POWER «*/ LIGHT
Put this outfit to work in their placé*
Your entire farm electrified meant
doinq many lobs by motor initttd
of b«| hand - liqhts in every bulldlnq
for
and
for
CO.
THE IDAHO ELECTRIC CO.
MONTPELIER, IDAHO
i Pay your subscription to the Examiner at once

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