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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, January 24, 1919, Image 1

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MONTPELIER EXAMINER.
NUMBER 44
MONTPELIER. IDAHO. FRIDAY. JAN. 24.1919.
▼OL.XXIV.
EXPERIMENTS DEMONSTRATE
Fill IS DISEASE OF MYSTERY
investigations by Medical Scientists and Health
Authorities Bring no Definite Results Fix
ing Status of Contagion in Epidemic*
cult
by
Ing
of
case
the
that
ihe
any
by
a
as
Washington, D. C.. Jan. 19.—An
experiment which makes the trans
mission of Influenza a more baffling
mystery than ever, and which at the
same time places on record an act of
self-sacrificing heroism by about one
hunderd naval volunteers, has just
been completed by officers of the
United States public health service
co-operating with medical officers of
the United States navy at Boston and
San Francisco.
"* As nearly everyone knows, scien
tists all over the world. In combatting
the spread of influensa, which la atill
going on, have proceeded on the as
aumptlon that « is transmitted chiefly
by coughing and spitting. The the
ory has been that the diseased mucus
thrown out by these acta Is filled With
the germs of influensa, which thus
finds lodgment In healthy tissue. All
the experiments heretofore made seem
to Indicate strongly that influenza is
transmitted in this way. and it Is well
accepted that most other respiratory
diseases are carried.
, This latest experiment consisted in
submitting the hundred men who
volunteered for the purpose to every
possible method of Infection with in
fluenza germs through the nose and
throat. These men risked their Uvea
for the general good, and for the ad
vancement of science. They went
throligh a singularly trying and re
pulsive ordeal. They, and everyone
else, believed that they were being in
oculated with the dread disease which
is destroying millions of lives all over
the world. Their heroism is fully
equal to that displayed some years
ago by the men of the army medical
corps who exposed themselves in Cu
ba to the bites of mosquitoes In order
to determine finally whether yellow
fever was transmitted by that Insect.
The only difference In the two ex
periments was in the result. Some of
the officers who exposed themselves
to the bite of the mosquito contract
ed yellow fever, and one of them died,
' .thereby establishing the soundness of
their theory. The volunteers who
submitted themselves to inoculation
with the germs of Influenza were ful
expected to take the disease, and
were prepared to dle._ But not one of
them developed any symptoms of In
fluenza.
be
of
Boise, Jan. 20.—Names are being
added daily to the official family of
the new administration. State Game
Warden Jones has appointed Dave
Rich of Fremont county as chief dep
nty and'Halter Keeffe of Boise, as
chief deputy. Governor Davis has
named Ben Darrah of Shoshone, Na
than Ricks of Rexburg. Andy Little
of Emmett, and Herbert Lamp of
Boise a smembers of the state live
stock sanitary board. The democrat
ie members of this hoard presented
their resignations ln a body after
State Veterinarian Bodle had resign
ed. This was establishing a new
precedent and waa done for the pur
pose of giving the new administra
tion an opportunity of Installing Its
own board members and to get thru
the legislature tlw legislation, they
desire.
Theory Is Upset.
This astonishing negative result,
which is the sensation of the day In
scientific circles, should not tempt
anyone to be careless ln the matter of
coughing and spitting or in exposing
himself to Infection by those acts.
As officials of the public health ser
vice point out, it may be that the
germs of the disease disappear as
aoon as, or Immediately after, the
symptoms appear. Something like
this is true of other diseases. In
measles, for example, It has been
found that the germs which cause
the disease are all gone within five or
six days after the appearance of the
rash, and the cose Is no longer conta
gious. The discovery of this fact,
wh$ch was made by Anderson and
Goldberger of the public health ser
vice only a few years ago, has led to
shortening the quarantine period for
measles by more than half.
"These uew experiments ln the
transmission of Influenza," said Sur
GOVERNOR NAMES LIVE
STOCK SANITARY BOARD
Various state departments are now
filing their biennlÿl reports with the
governor. State
Eagleson shows
during the post two years Interest
earnings amounted to $79,744.76.
The fees received amounted to 11,
910.60. There was saved in exchanges
$986.76, In Interest $19,586.89.
making a total of $95,228.89. The
Slate treasurer believes that he can
have the state $80,000 If given the
opportunity to invest portions of the
money* on deposit In the various
bonks. He recommends that no one
ly$Mn employment of tbe state be
penaitted to have a bank account of
ktate moneys separate from the state
treasury.
The report of State Auditor Van
Dessen advocates among other things
Æ
aturer John W.
his report that
tho aboUafcment « if the office of state
geon General Blue, "show how diffi
cult ia the influenza problem. They
by no means Indicate that we can
afford to disregard coughing, snees
Ing and spitting aa common meana
of Bpreading disease, and even In the
case of influenza this source of in
fection should alwaya be borne In
mind. 1 believe, however, that we
have not paid sufficient attention to
other paths of Infection, especially to
the lipa, mouth and hands. The fact
that the disease was much less com
mon in army camps, where the steril
ization of all eating utensils and
dishes was rigidly enforcedi shows
ihe Importance of the mouth as an
avenue of Infection."
The first experiment consisted in
thoroughly infecting the noses of
»bout ten of the men with cultures of
Pfeiffer's Influenza bacilua—a viru
lent germ commonly found In Influ
enza. None of the men developed
any symptoms. The next form of the
experiment was to take the secretions
from Che nosee and throats of Influ
enza patients and place them In the
noses and throats of the volunteers
by means of Bwabs and sprays. The
time occupied in removing the dis
eased mucus from a sick man and
putting It Into the nose or thorat of
a well man was reduced to as little
as thirty seconds. Yet none of the
men so infected developed any symp
toms of the disease.
c:
a.
Determined that lhe tests should
be exhaustive, the dB^tora next sub
mitted a group of volunteers to infec- j
tion by actual coughing and spitting,
For this purpose ten volunteers were
selected, and ten bed patients who
had recently jjome down with severe
attacks of Influenza. Each of the
volunteers leaned over the bed of I
each of the ten aick men, conversed
with him a few minutes and allowed
the patient to cough directly in his
face, so that there should be no
doubt of a transmission of diseased
tissue. Each volunteer was thus ex- 'of
posed to ten different cases of influ- ;„f
and was in close proximity with j
them for not leas than three-quarters
of an hour. Yet not one of these vol- j
unteers developed any symptoms of j
influenza.
The results of this experiment have j
left the medical world completely be
wlldered. !
The theory which has apparently !
been upset by these experiments was ! a
originated by a famous French phy- |
slcian, Nicolle, who claimed to have '
produced Influenza with a material
obtained from mucous excretions. He
produced the disease with this mate-1
rial after filtering It through a fine j
porcelain filter, showing that a germ ;
was present which was not only too |
small to be detected, with the micro
scope, but too small even to be held
back by the fine pores of unglazed j
porcelain. Foster, an American army !
surgeon, showed that common colds j
were produced by an equally minute j
germ. The work of Foster bore so !
directly on the problems presented by 1
influenza that it may be said to have
led to the experiments here described, j
The only thing which can be con- '
sldered proved about influenza so far \
y angerou».
commissioner of education, because
of the fact that the people have re
peatedly refused to abolish the office
of state superintendent of public ln
structura, and the two departments
form a duplication. In his opinion
a commission to handle the affairs
of the land department would save !
the state money and give a better ad-j
ministration. In the endowment
funds of the state, he claims a short- !
age of $237,000 exists, covering a i
period of twenty-seven years. State
Examiner Munro says in his report
that there is $7,000,000 annually un
reported taxpayers' money unaccount- |
ed for. The budget system for coun
ties is recommended by this official.
He would make taxes become delln
quent the third Monday in December.
ensa,

County division and good roads
promise to be two Important Issues
before the legislature. No less than
three' county division bills have
made their appearance—Clark, Carl
bou and Jerome. LitUe opposition
has developed to either Clark or Car-j
ibou as yet. Jerome is likely to have
hard going. It seeks to take terri
tory from Lincoln, Gooding and Min
idoka conntles. Lincoln Is favorable
to giving the proposed county of Je
rome the territory It asks. Gooding
Is not standing In the way. Mlnldo
ka. however, objects most violently
to giving up any of Its territory. The
opposition there may comprom'se
with the division lets and tack an en
sbling act upon the bill which will
permit the people to vote on the Is
sue of wht eher or not they want a
the
the
one
be
of
Van
new county. All these jffoposed coun
ties are from the son themes stern sec
None has so far appear»!
tlons.
from the north.
R only $1 g year
!B
01
Somewhere in the U. S. A.
' ■"W" ■g p i vr
■■■
n
'J
*
v f
-Y*
./ Jk-w
V
HI
m
t
-
a
1

n
\
1
'spirited rear action*
c: F. STOFFERS, tXJKEVILLE
PIONEER, DIES AT OLD AGE.
tute
and
of
Miss
ities
paid
>f
the
the
the
the
After a lingering Illness, lasting
nore than four years, Claus Creder
ck Stoffera, a well known and highly
respected citizen of Cokevllle. passed
itway, death occurring Thursday.
January l(th, 1919, at 11:55 o'clock
a. m.
Mr. Stoffers vs shorn February 17,
1834, in Seafeld, Oldesloe, then a
part of Denmark but now a German
possession. There he learned the
trade of cabinetmaker, serving an
apprenticeship of five years. He then
went to Holstein, Denmark, and con
tinued at his trade of cabinetmaker,
und In 1862 he sailed for America,
landing in New York. After hla ar
rival In America, Mr. Stoffers got em
ployment In the Steinway A Sons pi
ano manufacturing establishment,
and worked there for two years.
In 1864 Mr. Stoffers started across
the plains, driving an ox team for
Kimball & Lawrence, merchants of
salt Lake City, coming Juat a few
days aheand of the company <ft emi
grants, among whom was Misa Alleen
Annetta Anderson, who, on August
22, 1869, became hla wife,
in Salt Lake he again resumed his
trade of cabinet making and carpen
tering, and also done a little peddling
in Dixie, on the side, until the spring
'of 1881, when he came to the vicinity
;„f Cokevllle, and the following year
j filed on a
an( j engaged in ranching, and in the
j early '90s took up wool growing and
j sheep Industry and stock raising, be
{coming quite wealthy at these oceupa
j tlons. His sons assisted him during
jhls latter years.
! Mr. Stoffers leaves a large family,
! consisting of five boys and three girls,
! a ll of whom are alive; also a brother,
| Henry Stoffera, of Portland, Oregon,
' an j 26 grandchildren to mourn his
[death,
e< j by the Rev. J. O. A. Martin, of
j Montpelier, at the late residence of
; the deceased, on Sunday, at 1 o'clock
| p . m . interment In Cokevile ceme
Itery.—Cokevllle Register.
_■
j mrvav home
! »ATEN BRI AN HOME
j MONTHS Ft kmm.uii
j _ „ " , . . ..
! Bates Bryan arrived last Sunday
1 morning from Quantlco, Va on a
"Wl day« furlough. He 1« the sec
j °" d Bear Lake boy, who was wound
' ln *f,V, on to ret , urn home andre-.
\ lal ® thrilling experiences of the battU
tho thlngi he an<1 the „perlene, »
through which be went. He receive I ,
an explosive machine gun bullet là w
the hip, which made a deep and ugl^
wound and ended his lighting days,
He is now feeling fine and has practl
cally recovered from the effects of the
wound, but has no Idea when he will i
be mustered oat of service. He said
! that he had no desire, whatever, to
remain in France and the happiest
day ln hla life was Jan. 8, when be
! again set foot on good old United
i States soli.
-: .
MERCHANT MARINE
|
The government shipping board at
Washington announces that recruits
are urgently needed for the merchant
! marine service The following tele
homestead on Sublet Creek,

The funeral service« were conduct
of
ty
an
ty

l
IN NEED OF HAII/ORH
gram on the subject was received by
Governor Davis last Monday:
; "The United States shipping board
would thank you to call public atten
tion to the opportunities for employ
ment and a career offered at present
by the United States merchant ma
lernl. Americans between 18 and 36
i years of age will be accepted by this
board for special training as firemen,
sailors or stewards at *30 a month. ,
1 board Included. After two months'
. training they will be provided with
positions on ocean going vessels nn- j
1 der the American flag ht wages from ;
; 955 to $75 a month, board included,
{Opportunity to see the world and t or
' advance In rating until officers' pos
tlons are reached will be open to aj
Is- who enter this service. The boai
a «'ants two thousand men at once 1
ut on Its training ships at Atlant!
Fares are paid 1
ll
*r Pacific ports.
place of training
I
!
Many a temperate sextan flUg.
j drunkard's grava
TRUSTEES ARE LIMITED
IN THE CLONING POWER
Minimum school terms of nine and
seven months provided by Idaho sta
tute must be carried to completion if
districts affected are to ahare In state
and county funds, according to an
opinion sent Monday from the office
of Attorney General Roy L. Black to
Miss Ethel E. Kedfleld, state superin
tendent of schools.
In case the schools were ordered
dosed by state or local health author
ities .terms may be abridged without
penalty, but wherever vacations were
announced at the Instance of the
school boards themselves, the mini
mum legal requirement must be met.
A recent opinion of the attorney
general held that teachers must be
paid In periods of enforced Idleness.
Districts which do not complete min
imum terms and are thereby ril shared
from the use of either state or county
funds may receive relief In the gulae
>f an act of the leglatature.
Outlining Tuesday's official dictum,
Dean Driscoll, assistant attorney gen
eral, said:
"The holding la In substance that
the trustees of both common and In
dependent school districts have Im
plied power to suspend school tem
porarily any time, subject only to the
absolute requirement that not leas
than the minimum term of seven or
nine months, as the case may be, be
held during the year.
"Trustee# of neither class of d's- j
trlcta have any power to auapend for !
such a length of time os would Invade j t
the minimum term fqr the year The j
minimum term Is seven months In j
school districts having leas than 75
pupils and nine months In districts !
having more than that number. On |
the other hand, the local health au- i
tflorltles have express power to close ;
the schools at any time and for any !
length of time. !
"If the schools are closed by order
Lieutenant Lloyd Lehrbnè. Instruc -1
tor | n flying at Love Field, Texas, has !
hut wa . offered a splendid propositi n
, n the f amou * Burkburnett oil field,
w hich he acce nted
—AtpresenT H« !» sal es
(be Wichita-Van Cleave Oil Co...
which he organized with Lts. Catlln
an< j ixcgton and W. M. Prlddy, prom
i neut 0 il man of Wichita Falls. !
of the health authorities, as dlstin
gulshed from the district trustees, the
school receive« Its share of both coun
ty and state funds, bat, on the other
hand, If the district trustees them-.
selves keep the school closed to such !
an extent that the minimum term la
not held,the district la entitled to par
tlclpate In neither the state nor coun
ty funds."
LLOYD LKHRBAH IS
WOUNDED LINCOLN CO.
SOLDIER TO HOSPTTAI
One of onr townsmen met Gilbert
Weaver of Cokevllle, on the train be
tween Granger and Ogden. Thursday
morning of Isst week Mr. Weaver
was severely wounded In the thigh by
xrrapnel at the Champagne front to
Frsnce. end was then on his way to
• he Letterman General Hospital. Han
Francisco. He expects to be b<-!d In
the hoepltal for about four months,
bat will be Anally discharged In good
liealth. His wound is not expected to
l ave any permanent disability.
Camara.
, -:
\|Ovn*KLIKR MAY GET
j
;
or
Mr. Weaver was sent home on the
Transport Northern Pacific, which
ran aground off Fire Island about six
ty miles out of New YorF City, and
was one of those taken off In «mall
boats during a storm.— Kemmerer
A GERMAN CANON
öofiltressman Smith has Introduced
«bill for the purchase of a alte for a
proposed federal building st Block
foot. and also a bill to furnish a cap
tured Oerman canon, together with a
suitable complement of canon balls,
projectile«, or shells, for exhibition,
to each of the following eitle«:
Bo»se. Twin Falls, Pocatello. Idaho
I Falls. Blackfoot, Saint Anthony,
! Montpelier, Haller. Buhl and Barley.
Tha Es*mÏMg~ Is only J *9 a yoori
FINISH WORK ON NEW
INCOME TAX MEASURE
The Last Revision of That Important Feature of
the Revenue Bill Has Been Concluded by
the Conference Committee.
Washington. Jan. 11.—Confer
on the now two-year war revenu«
b.ll har« completed their work on lha
•ncomn tax »action of the measure.
Th« I oat revision of that Important
f ature of lha bill haa been concluded.
The lost word haa b««n anld, except,
perhaps. a few Ineffectual prouata
when ihn conference report cornea up
for ratification In both houaoa.
It may therefore be definitely »tat
ed what the Income tax will be which
the Aihertcan people muat pay ror
the year 1911 and alao for the year
1919 and thereafter, uni
llcan congresa about to come Into be
.ng ahould amend the pending law.
or
or
Tax on Income«
On incomes of Individual« the tax
is to be as follow»: -ror the eaten
liar vear 1911 IS ner cent of thc
amount of the n'e/lncome In exceea of ,
a repub
j
! . . _ ,
j t * ry °* î? 4 *ï 4or l '* n0
j *ddr«*««d to lbs house commltt« on
j l^Mlons. and constituted a part of
U*» secretary'» report recommending
! *» *»"«•' »*.«•« •»
| granted to Mrs Roaaevelt. It 1« as
i , .. . _ .._
; Tbs Impress that Theodore Bo»«
! »»•'!'• personality has made upon the
! world does not need emphasis What
!**•* bis fame as a statesman. It can
naver outrun hla tame as a man
the credits provided In section lid:
Provided, that In case of a citizen or
resident of the United States the rate
upon the first 9$.900 of such amount
shall be 0 per centum:
"For each calendar year thereaf
ter. 8 per cent of the amount of the
net Income In excess of the credits
provided In section 916: Provided,
that in case of a clttsen or resident .
of the United States citizen the rate *
upon the first 94000 of such amount
shall be 4 per pent."
(tax
or
be
In addition to the above, the sur
taxes on large Income« range from 1
per cent on net Incomes In excess of
$6000 and not in excess of 90000, to
66 per cent on tha Income In exoeoa
of 91,000.000.
Exemptions or credits under the
law os affecting individuals shall be
as follows: "The amount received
as dividends from a corporation
which la taxable uuder this title upon
Us net Income:
-1
!
*"« '* 4 *" J, 4 ™ "'"f * r "
lf h , . r ^ ! f. < . *!f,. t !!! 4 ?_
VAurer f »metban^tb I» can come to «ny
" ?"__ * h ^ rtt „2
, ,? ** one i *"®* 1 *' a °* B 6* ***"
,"** 4 wou,a W ** B *°
*"* r owl1 '
!
.HUM HKTAKY LANK PAYS
TRIBUTE TO ROOSEVELT
if
One of the muet beautiful tribut««
that has been paid to th« laic Col.
Roosevelt, Is from the pen of Hecre
It wag
,, .. , _ .
However widely men may differ from
1,1 matter of national policy, this
,B **** r hearts would all
wish, that their sons might have
, .. , ,,,
! within them the spirit, the will, the
strength, the manliness, the Amert
^olsm of Rooeevelt. He was made
Usi, *[**!?
wmcb legend deiignts to play, tb«
idylls and aagee and Iliads have been
woven about men of hie mold. We
may surely expect to see developed a
Roosevelt legend, a body of tales that
will exalt tha physical power sad en
durance of the man and the holdneos
c f bis spirit, hla robust capacity for
And no
!■
COLORADO FARMERS
DISCARD GRADE HULLS
The Garfield County (Colo.,) Farm
Bureau saved the farmer* of the
county $10,000 last year through co
operativ« buying of pare-bred bulla
The live-stock committee late In the
summer of 1017 surveyed the county
and found many grade bulla ware be
ng used on the range. During the
winter of 1917-18 several meetings
of the live-stock committee and the
rarm bureau aa a body were held, and
t wsa decided that only the beet of
to bulls should be used on the range, A
committee of nine woe appointed to
>.bta!n orders and purchase the bulls.
..ed through the county agent got In
toach with large breeders throughout
«be United Slates. Aa a result 109
r . glitered Shorthorn and Hereford
hulls were «hipped Into the county.
SAYS THE "BIO FIVE"
CONTROL EVERYTHING
Denver, Jan, 22.—Tbe five big
eat packing films of the United
tatea are declared to have
■ntrol over both product «g and dis
puting market«, by Senator Rend
ck of Wyoming, here today that
mit all
1
a
a
t|«y have tbe power "to - -
lie abusas with which they are
charged, and more," regardless of
ether they are la actu al combin a
- v
eh
«
t
_f As a woman's beauty fad eu
brain« earn« to the fraaL
"The amount received as Internet
upon obi gâtions of tho Hotted Hut *
and bonus issued by the war ttnwucc
corporation, which ta Included In
groee income under auction til:
"In the css« of a a ngle person, a
personal exemption of »1000, or .n
the case of the head of s fain ly or a
married person living with huabuUu
or wife, e personal exemption of
19000 against their aggregate net
income, and. In case they make asp
erate returns, the personal exemp
tion or $2000 may be taken by s.ther
or divided between them;
"Two hundred dollars for each
person tether than husband or wife)
dependent upon and receiving hla
*|»** ,* U P»*°V ' rum * h * »
dependent person la under 1»
l>WB °* or *• Incapable of ««If
X^feXe"** W phy, '°
.
*
Aa t« Head.of Family.
Under theee provisions the Income
(tax to be paid by a married person
or head of a family with no depend
ents, not Including exempt!
bonds or taxable dividende,
be as follows for ths calendar year
1918 and for the year 1910:
Tax 1010.
Ion for
would
Income.
9.500
1,000
9.600
4.000
4.500
6.000
6.600
0.000
6.500
7.000
7.500
6.000
1,600
0.000
0,600
10,000
Tog 1919
»
so
»
9 0
«0
I
#0
«0
120
so
if,»
mo
ISO
110
216
146
R I«
170
320
990
.190
970
400
3 20
690
170
••I
490
080
480
766
635
130
I'RODUtT 1'IUt 'KM ARE
TO REMAIN HIGH.
B. H. I.lndley, president of lha
University of Idaho, «topped off in
Rols« « f«w days this week while n
route home from Baltimore where be
had been In attendance of the annual
meeting of college presidents.
"The meeting developed many Im
portant matters," said Prof. Llndley
In conversation with a Capital News
representative, "principally the report
if the committee cent abroad by the
department of agriculture to study
agricultural conditions there and
prospects. Their conclusion la that
food prices will remain high for a
considerable time -perhaps several
veare -owing to the fact that Ihe
food supply cannot he gotten hoch to
normal England will restock Prone«
with cattle. For the Oral time AmK
lean stock will he emit over there to
reaew the herds In Franc« and per
haps Italy. In the post,
ten all our blooded stock from over
there
"The outlook for the American for
mer tor good prices la extremely fa
favors b le Dean Davenport of the
University of Illinois, president of
the nseoclatlon, In dealing with the
economic side of farming, declared
that the farmer receives on aa aver
age of 90 cents per hoar for hla la
bor, which I» far below the scale of
labor price« for other trades. Me
further stated that the economic re
we have got
turn of the farmer must be I ner we
ed If we are to maintain oar farms
and retain on them a hi
close of men. In other war
sufficient return of the farmer l ea ds
to the development of n pee sent
m
Ml
grade
farming claw which la from lb*
standpoint of national welfare, a
great disadvantage.
«*<
INFLUENZA EFIDEMIU
SEEMS ABOUT BROKEN
So far as can he learned It
the Influensa epidemic baa «boat run
He course la Nampa la th« city
Unsre has been a« death from that
The uew
case# have been light eed there have
been few of them Moot of the earns
under quarantine last weak have boea
released and but very few cases have
been pat ander quarantine. Open
ing ihe schools, church«« and ptetara
•hows have sot Increased the d
and the Men la gaining ground that
tbe disease Is not eousaaanlesud by
people mingling.
Tbe schools have now been open
ot u Slagle ease of
deve lop a d .—Nampa
two
tnfiuciiM
leader-Herald
_,,_ — . .
»dm In 1st ratine o «letale, argwd that as
of * I, ***' a * grated of 16 days of tbe
a half freight rate on hay from «oath
v |<t a |,b to mule
In the drouth strick
BORAH URGES EXTENSION
OF THE ( HKAF RAT RATE
Wash lagt aa.
Borah. In confer«*«* with railroad
and farmers
T
The reduced rate provleioa
expira« Janaary It.

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