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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, February 28, 1919, Image 1

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I
MONTPELIER EXAMINER.
I
MONTPELIER, IDAHO, FRIDAY, FEB. 28, 1919.
VOL. XXIV.
NUMBER 49
TAX RETURNS MUST
BE FILED BY MARCH 15

The Law Provides Heavy Penalties-Payment of
Tax May be Made in Full at Time Filing
Return or in Four Installments.
Washington, Web. 14.—Work on
tM collection of 16,000,000,000 ha*
haa been begun by the Bureau of In
al Revenue. This ia the estimated
of the new revenue bill. The
iaOoate tax provisions of thé act
rna«* tha'pocket-book of every single
parson in the United States whoee net
incomd for 1118 was 11,000. or more,
and of every married person whose
net -Wenn* was 11,000 or more. Per
sons whoee net income equalled or
exes sied these amounts, according to
their marital status, must Ole a re
turn of Ineome with the collector ot
internal revenue for the district in
which they JHve on or before March
tetbs
yield
16.
Here la what will happen to them
M they don't: for failure to file a re
turn ou time, a line of not more than
11,000 and an additional assessment
of S5 par cent of the amount of tax
due.
For "willfully refusing" to make a
return on time, a fine not exceeding
110,000,, or not exceeding one year's
imprisonment, or both.
For'making n false or fraudulent
return, a fine of not more than 110,
000, or Imprisonment for not more
than one year, or both, together with
an additional assessment of 50 per
cent of the amount of tax evaded.
For failure to pay the tax on time,
a fine of not more than $1,000 and
, an additional, assessment of 6 per
cent of the amount of tax unpaid,
plus 1 per oent Interest for each full
month during which It remains un
paid.
IHR DRIVE THAT KDDI*
O'CONNOR RKMKMBKKH
Eddie O'Connor, who Is a member
of the 160th field artillery, which saw
much hard service in France, write*
to his mother and sister in this city
from Nauenahr/ Germany, under
date of Jan. 29, as follows:
Dear Mother and Sister:—I re
ceived «11 your letters up to Jsn. 6tb
and sevdfed Examiners and would
have written sooner but have been
somewhat' under the weather for the
last week. ' I guess I hsd a little
touch of'the la grippe but I am feel
ing fin* now.
1 was sorry to hear that you had
been worrying about me but I don't
think any of the boys of this division
done much letter writing the last
. two months of the war. It was one
continuous round of work night and
day. wallowing through mud and
sleeping anywhere, that is, trying to,
hut 1 don't think anybody ever slept
much. - How could you with the gas
burning ' your throat and noae all
Bight, the cooties and vermin eating
at you, and the continued whining
af sheila through tb
ing all around you?
by the whine when one was coming
dose snd a person sure could hug the
ground till it bit. Many a time I
have hgd dirt And shell fragments
thrown all over me. I have seen
men torn to pieces all around me and
one day a horse I was holding hsd
its hind leg nearly cut off by a piece
of shell. 1 will never- forget the
morning of Nov. 1st, the morning
the drive started in the Argonne. Dur
guns were pulled up even ahead of
some of the 76's, right up to the in
fantry third lines, so close that an
infantry oScer made the remark that
we ought to have put bayonets on
our big guns. Our post of command
was right along by the side ot our
First Aid station in the shell torn
village of Sommerance. The Ger
mans were shelling us hard every
night so of course we were mil anx
ious tor the drive to start and it did
on the morning of the 1st. The street
In front of the P. C. was full of
wounded—Americans sad Germans
sad the wounded Germans were con
stantly pouring Into the first aid sta
tion to have their wounds dressed.
They didn't need any guards to bring
them bnék. they were glad enough V
and turn themselves In
ae they said it was almost impossible
for any living thing to survive under
the barrage that morning. Our In
fantry and the 2nd Division Marines
mad* the attack and kept going until
they reached Sedan about the time
the armistice was signed. They were
so fast trying to keep up with
Germans that they had
Uon with them for sev
A column of artillery, sup
k the air and burst
You could tell
said
gol
I
un
day*.
traten.
. ral
Pt9
to keep ap with
trring
rar dM
In addition to tho 11.000 and 11,
000 personal exemptions, a taxpay
era are allowed an exemption of 1100
for each person dependent upon them
for chief support if such person is
under eighteen years of age and inca
pable of self-support,
HIT act, this exception was allowed
only for each dependent "child." The
head of a family—one who supports
one or more persons closely connect
ed with him by blood relationship,
relationship by marriage, or by adop
tlon—is entitled to all exemptions
allowed a married person,
Under the
The normal rate of tax under the
new act is 6 per cent of the flret
14,600 of net income above the ex
emptions, snd 13 per cent of the net
income in excess ot 14,000. Income*
in excess of 15,000 are aubject .also
to a surtax ranging from 1 per cent
of the net income abode 11,000,000.
Payment of the tax may be made
in full at the time ot tiling return or
in four installments on or beforo
September 16, and on or before Do
cembeir lty
Revenue officers will visit every
county in the United -States to aid
taxpayers In making out their re
turns. The date ot their arrival and
the location of their offices may be
ascertained by Inquiring at offices of
collectors ot Internal revenue, postof
flees and banks. Failure to see these
officers, however, does not rwHeve the
taxpayer ot his obligation to fila his
return and pay his tax within the
time specified by law. In this case
taxpayers must seek the government,
hot the government the taxpayer.
1
I
I
I
,
When H. M. Moore, manager of the '
H. M. MOORE RETURNS FROM
CHICAGO WITH A BRIDE.
Riter Bros. Drug Co., left for th*
oast four weeks ago to visit with hi*
mother In Iowa and take In the sights 1
at Chicago, he did not ao much a*!
hint to his friends that his visit to :
Chicago was for the purpose of claim- !
Ing as his bride one of the charming i
young ladles of that city. But auch
was the case and Wednesday, Feb
10'. at the home of David Stevens, !
uncle of the bride, Mr. Moore
Mias Isabelle Ferguson were united
in the holy bonds of matrimony. Mrs. |
Moore has been a resident of Chicago ;
for some years, and during the past !
year she was In the milinery depart- i
ment of the Marshall Field company. ;
Mr. and Mrs. Moore arrived In
Montpelier last Saturday afternoon.
They will go to housekeeping as soon
as a suitable home can be secured.
__'Lewis
j
LOVERS OF MONTPELIER
_____
Prof. J. J. McClellan, the noted
Salt Lake organist, and Prof. Willard
Weihe, the premier violinist of the !
west, will give a concert in the Mont
pelter tabernacle on Monday night,
March 10, assisted by the stake choir,
This will be the first assemblage tO
be held in the new tatfernacle and the
selections by Prof. McClellan on the
12,500 pipe organ will alone be
worth the price of admission. It ia
expected that the taberdhcle will be
filled to Its capacity on this occasion.
_
A TREAT FOR MU8IC
to do much more firing before the
armistice was signed, it is ail over
now, though, and to look back at it
seems like some delirium or hideous
dream.
I am sending you a descriptive
booklet printed In English of this
It was usfcd as adver
town. I gu
Using matter before the war. i am
going to try and get hold of some
copies of the test Stars and Stripes
and send you. It contains an Interest
ng history of some of the battiee of
(be Rainbow Division and some oth
r Interesting article*. I went up to
be Rhine the other day, horseback,
vlth a bunch of the fellows snd was
ip to Coblenz one day on pas* and
sad a very good time.
It is getting Ute. so I will have to
lose for this time-but will writ* you
gate te a few days. I hop* you are
iH well snd that I will soon be wltb
yon.
There te a class of persons so anx
ions to be helpful to everybody they
Succeed ia helping nobody.
I0
a
T
The Annual Problem
m
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IDAHO INVENTED N KARL Y »
««,000,000 IN WAR STAMPS
Allen B. Baton, executive secreta
ry of the war savings department of
Idaho, has Issued a statement cover
ing the war savings records during
1618.
showing Just what Idaho accomplish
ed, the figures from the counties
which stood first snd the sales In each
county.
The report saya In part:
"During 1118 Idaho sold war sav
ings stamps to the amount of •&,
861,664.73, In maturity values. This
Is a per capita sale of 114.50 for the
state.
about equals the performance of the
country as a whole or is perhaps a
little ahead of the average perform
ance.
Hia statement give* figures
In a word, Idaho's record
"The statistics show that there
were four counties with a record be
tween 120 and $30 per capita; fif
teen counties with s showing of be
tween 116 snd 120; elevsa counties
between 110 snd 116; and eleven
counties below $10 per capita. Power
county Is at the tall end of the list,
with a showing of only 14.46 per cap
Its in maturity values. This would
I be considerably less In actual cash.
"Ada county had been among the
' flr,t flve unUI the en <* when •»»«*
ped to eighth place, with a maturity
value per capita sale of 117.60; Ada
1 < ' ounty • poatofflce sales for the
ye * r »«7M16.lt"
The record for counties Is as fol
lows:
:
!
i Blaine"** .
Bonneville !_
.Lemhi._ r
! Oneida -
— -
Net Peres!_
| Ada _
; Shoshone
! -" ~
i Benewah T
; Canyon. ....
Gooding

:Getn.
Bear Lake.
_
j Elmore.
'Camas. _
Boundary
Lincoln _
-
Mad"*on !!!
! Washington
Adams .—
Bingham
g","'"* 1
Teton
Payette,
^aho -
Cassia ...
Valley
-Jefferson. -
Owyhee_
Power.
Total sales.
102.831.64
286,686 35
114.080.64
139.866.86
440.666.65
266,628.00
266,268.00
267,316.13
670,603.16
868,243 «7
377.438.86
74,078.7»
184.833.52
255,729 21
118,968 24
63,048.76
127,703.41
96,104 IS
232.482.40
103.210.7*
82,876.00
44,075.10
66.270.03
07.078 48
237,601.71
147.181.03
06,036.43
120.246.04
63,661.64
148.901.60
307.051.07
27.606 64
34.916.26
104,648 77
107.408.88
40.602.18
80,844 08
74,669.81
16,901.88
47.266.03
20,470 46
29.747.27
_,j_
IMPROVEMENT AT
16,111,164.71
MONTPELIER HOHPTTAL
The Montpelier hospital 1a under
,
* on * mprovementa which will make
It as strictly sanitary »» any hospital
t n the Inter-mountain region. All of
(he wood . wort w „ )u aB d celling*
put on In tbe operating room A new
tape ratas of the latest design has
been Installed for sterilizing the w*
. __a ^_ » __^
t * r> r * trum ® n !* dressings used
•* operations. Tbe Improvements twp
! resent an outlay of About 1604. snd
shows a desire on Dr. Ashley's part to
; keep np wltb the times.
nr« being enameled, six coats being
!
.
j Th* Examlasr, 11.00 a year.
ON* UNIT OF OU) HIMTINR
IDAHO HA UK FROM FRANC*
The 116th engineers arrived In
New York a few days ago and will
be mustered out at Camp Dix. N. J.
This unit ia composed of four com
panies of the old Becond Idaho regi
ment. one of the companies being
from Boise. The Commercial Club
»t that city la arranging to give them
a royal reception upon their arrival
home.
As the 116th Is composed entirely
■f Idaho boys, it is to be hoped that
on route home they will pass through
Montpelier In the day time. This
will be their flrst stop In Idaho and
the people of Montpelier and Bear
Irnke county would like to have the
privilege of giving them a little treat.
These boys, along with the rest of the
■Id Becond Idaho, were given a roua
ng farewell as they pa teed through
Montpelier a year ago last October
on their way to Berlin." That they
did not reach the Oerman capital
was not the fault of the boys, but
they did their full part in putting the
tear of God Into the Oermaos, and
Bear Lake la Just as proud of them as
are the counties from which the sev
eral companies of the 116th were
recruited, and Montpelier Is "Just
Itching" for the chance to give them
hearty handshakes and otherwise
welcome them home. We believe that
an effort should be made with the
railroad officials to have the train
tarrying these boys home scheduled
no Jt will pass through Southern
Idaho in the day time, as every town
between Montpelier and Boise would
tike the chance of greeting return
ng heroes.
«NIUNTY DAIW GRIND
OUT BATCH OF BUHINKHH
Commissioners
Peterson
Wright held a two-days session this
week and run quite a batch of ban
nes* through the hopper. Comtnts
ttloner Howell was detained In Balt
Lake and was unable to attend the
nnd
sessions.
The bonds of several precinct of
fleers were approved, bills were al
lowed, the Jury list for 1919 was
drawn, the application of Sheriff
Athay for th* appointment of a dep
uty was granted and the eatery fixed
at 1100 a month. Auditor Rich was
also granted a deputy at a salary of
190 a month.
Owing to the absence of Commis
sioner Howell, the appointment of a
county physician was deferred until
the next meeting on March 11.
The official proceedings will he
published next week.
MRM. OHTERLIN, PIONEER OF
NT. CHARI,KM, PANMEM AWAY.
Mrs. Karin Osterlln died at the
home of her daughter, Mrs. Marie
Clark, In St. Charte* on Monday, Feb.
17. The deceased was born at Ms rata.
Sweden, on Sept. 21, 1136. but tb*
greater part of her life, before com
ing to America, was spent at Btock
iolm. She came to this country dur
ng the summer of 1178, and located
to
Bora after arriving.
'.her* eh# was married to H. P. Oster
Hn and that fall they removed to fft.
Charles, where she baa since resided
3h# lived a quiet life and was very «#-;
voted to her family and religion
Her only era and one daughter pra
ceded her te the Orest Beyoad a few
veers ago. Bh* te survived by one
daughter, eleven grandchildren and
one great grandchild.
it Belt Lake.
held at tho fit. Chartes ward chaps)
f. Fab. 10.
SIX BILLION DOLLAR WAR
TAX BILL NOW IN FORCE
President Signs the Measure While En Route
from Boston to National Capital-Secretary
Urges Cheerful Acquiescence.
Washington, Feb. II.—Signing ot
the revenue bill by President Wilson
sa route to Washington last night
puts Into operation the machinery fot
collecting six billions of taxes this
year.
Higher taxes go Into effect today on
liquor and soft drinks. Including
near-beer, grape Juice, soda water and
mineral waters, and on tobacco and
so-called luxuries. Anticipating the
Imposition of new taxes, thousands
of gallons of whisky had been with
drawn from government bonded
warehouses within the last week,
with tax paid at the old rate of ti ll
a gallon, to escape the higher rate of
16.46 a gallon now affective.
Articles In the "luxury" class on
which new taxes go into effect today
nclude automobiles and motor aeeea-,
sorlee. pianos, sporting goods, chew
ng gum. cameras, candy, flrearms,
slot machines, toilet aoapa and art
good«. The tax la paid by the manu
facturer.
Other feature* of the tax hill which
goes Into legal effect today, but which
retroactive and whloh consequently
are not practically affected by the
time of the signing of the bill, in
clude the following:
Tsxee on tucomee. expreae profits
und war proflts; estates and Inherit
ances: and excise taxes on epeclal
huslneeeee, euch us brokers, bowling
alleys. Insurance companies, theatre
und amusement place proprietors and
liquor dealers. Drastic measures to
prevent narcotic drug traffic become
effective at once.
On April 1, new taxes on railroad
CONVENTION PLAN IN
PLAUR OF PRIMARY.
The legislature has repealed the
elate-wide primary snd substituted
Is Its pises party oonvantlons for th«
nominating of congressional. Judicial
and state officers. This action was
taken Tuesday afternoon, when the
house passed senate bill No. 00. It
was spprovsd by party vote, tbs re
publican majority voting for sad ths
democratic minority against.
»no republican voted against the bill.
He was Representative Bennett ef
Gooding.
Bat
The measure will shortly be be
fore Ooverndr Davis for approval.
What action he will take la causing
no little speculation In legislative cir
ri**. There la a possibility he may
return It with the request certain
change* be made or may veto It, sey
those opposed to tbs repeal net.
Those In favor of the measure de
clare he will sign It.
Under the primary law as changed
by tbla hill, the recognised political
partie* will hold stete conventions
made op of 'delegatee selected at
county conventions. The delegates
to the Utter will be elected at eoun
ty primaries at which county and
legUUtlve candidates are nominated.
The non part lean Judiciary Is done
»way with. Under the Uw a* It now
existe, candidate* for the supreme
and district courts were nominated
at primary elections without parly
designation or nonpartisan. If the
effective
each party will pet ap Its candidates
for th* bench, Just as cengveaelonal
and state office candidate* ere to be
a
amendatory law beeom
j nominated te the con rent Ions
DKFENMB BEEKM TO
:
IMPEACH WITNRNM
Th# trial of the Hennings** Pro
dues Co. and other like organ I tat Iona,
which has been In progress before th*
' U. B. court In Bote* for the pari two s
week*, te attracting wide attention,
» R Brennan and B. F. «mall, who
wore called to Bote* tb* Bret of test
{week as wit»sees«, are Mill there,
The feature of Wedamday's pressed
tegs was th* attempt of tho de! «ad
ants to Impeach th* tesflmowy of B
P- «mall Wednesday » Capital New*
■ays:
Witasse «mall testified that be was
•* Mon!P*Her branch af
•be Henniugaea Produce company far
lfilt «a 1*M, dni
I 1
and steamship tickets, pipe lines, In
surance, theatre admissions and club
lues and a variety of stamp taxes
oecume olfactive. Levies against the
excess of value of so-called semllux
urtee. such as articles of drees, will
be mad* after May 1. The soda foun
tain tax bscomse affective May 1.
Taxes on products ot child labor wtU
be Imposed in sixty days.
Bocratary Ulnae today appealed to
the American people to pay cheerful
|y the higher war taxes which want
into'effect today with the signature
by President Wilson of the
new
revenue bill, lie referred to It as a
"victory tax,
war which has brought "thu Inusa
ble boon of peace."
Secretary Q teas' appaal. aaaertlag
that "the «rar mast be said for *
..Id:
to bear the coot of a
"It Is a shallow kind of patriotism
that does not burn brightly la Urns of
peace as well ae In time of war
it
la a poor aort of patriot who would
shirk the duty he steadfastly per
formed a year ago.
"The Income tax this year was a
liberty tes. This year It Is a victory
lax, but tba purpose of each are the
same, to defray the coat of a world's
wsr that has broagbt to tbs United
States snd Its associates tbs Ineffable
boon of peace
"The koveremeat. therefore, ap
peals to that higher form of patriot
ism which is not dependant spun the
shouting nnd the tumult to co-op*,
ruts In the collection of taxes this
year with the same splendid spirit ot
last year."
FRANK Hour M GUARDING
TH* RHIN* IN GKKMANY.
Mrs E L. McCteva Is la reoelpt of
»a Interesting letter from her
Prtnk Hoop, who has been la Fraaea
ever since the first expeditionary ar
my went across to put tba »has to
sleep. A portion of the latter Is aa
follows:
You ask what battles I have been
Was in Champagne and It was
there I was woanded July II. Myself
snd four other boy* were In a "pill
box," when a big shell hit It, blowing
Sur gun to pieces and kilting nil the
"»her boys nnd breaking two ef my
ribs and cutting a deep gash u my
left side. I was taken to the hospital
and discharged In time to go la with
the company at Chateau Thierry,
wklch was the worst haute of them
all. From there w* went to fit. Ml
1*1*1 and weal over the'top there nnd
were ready to go Into th* net samp
afterward*, which we did,
traded pneumonia and was taken to
th* hospital agate, but released Jest
n time to Join tee boy* on the way to
tb* Rhine as an army of oeeapntloa.
W* are al Krlpg My address te 161
M. O Bat. Hsadq«artera Co. 4lad Dt
UMMINN IN THE NCW
DEMO« RATIO LEAD*«
Washington, Feb 11 —Hi
a.
Cummins of Craned trot, was steeled
chairman of the National Democrat!*
commute« today.
voted I or »or ga a is* for an aggremd»*
smpslgn la 1911.
ing which lime L. F. B'ddtch. field
sgent for the Hennings** people,
suggested te him that ae tah* off two
points to hla testa, saying "You an
lerataad what they waat. and If yea
sanot do that, you mum get mi ''
Shortly after that «mall -w*e din
barged by Hennin
>nd others sent to
»gara, and Biddle
Montpelier
te iahe
>ver tb* agalre ef tbo company. They
s tbtegHtnd frabee^sLutewMate by*l*t>
ter with th* bom* o*ce afterwards.
TJ 11 * he refused to do
t ** tl
art were there and had a row with
BlddWk. «mull refusing to tara w«r
y bo cheeked short with
the company white B'dd th sad <xh
a clearance
(eetlfiad that ha
till» ffnuftiji
toekog ftsMtok i
to •
-I---a* day
Drfeaee then sahsd «malt If ter bad
eot mid that h* "had trat th*
easy 8100.000 and would «rat th
to which «mail roel'edTthat
h~
had not said any

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