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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, March 14, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1919-03-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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HEAD SALESMAN
SP ENT H UNDREDS
Burton Suffered Twenty Tears
Before Finding the Right
Medicine
In speaking of the marvelous way
la which Tan lac has relieved him or a
long-standing case of rheumatism, B.
E. Burton, head salesman in the
wholesale fruit and vegetable depart
ment at Cutey Bros.. Butte, Mont.,
living at 662 South Montana Street,
recently seid:
"It is simpy astonishing that Just
a few bottles of Tanise should fix me
up in almost no time, after I had
spent almost every dollar I earned
tu the last twenty years trying to gel
relief from that awful rheumatism."
Before coming to Butte Mr. Bur
ton lived for ten years in Spokane,
Wash., where he was salesman for
the imperial Trading Company of
that city.
"I tell you what." he continued. "I
have gone through all stages of
rheumatism, and the agonies I have
had to endure simply cannot be de
scribed. Tbe trouble first came on
me about twenty years ago.
shoulders, knees and ankles gave me
the most worry sud ached so at times
that 1 hardly had any use for myself.
About three years ago it got so bad
that I was laid up In bed for six
months, and when I got up again I
had to go about on crutches for three
months, and till recently 1 never did
get it out of my system! although 1
have spent hundreds of dollars In
trying to get straightened out. I
went to Hot Springs, Arkansas, but
without result and then I tried the
mud baths nearer home, but got no
benefit from that treatment either.
A little while ago I felt It coming on
pretty bad again. My appetite left
me, nothing tasted right, I was con
stipated and suffered front awful
headaches every few days. The pain
In my shoulders and knees was so ag
onizing that I could hardly sleep and
I would wake up six or seveu times
during the night racked with pain.
Why,at the time I started taking Tar.-,
lac I couldn't raise my arms as high
as my shoulders to save my life and
was unable to put on my coat with
out somebody helping me, and my
knees were so stiff and hurt so bad
1 could hardly walk.
"After reading so much about Tan
lac I decided to try it and I hadn't
finished my first bottle before the
stiffness began to leave my Joints,
and now I never suffer a bit of pain
or inconvenience. My second bot
tle gave me a whacking big appetite,
that constipation' is relieved and I
never have a headache. I sleep like
a log all night, and am lucky if I
wake up In time for breakfast before
going to work. I certainly am glad
to endorse Tanlac and only hope my
experience with this wonderful med
icine will help someone else who
may be going through what I did.
Tanlac is sold In Montpelier by th,e
Modern Drug Co.—Advt.
My
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AI waysWelcome
"Y"?rucal-plaved »long (he way, didn't you?
Kept zrandma waiting! Oh widl, it'a all right. Because
CALUMET
BAKINQ POWDER
ia atway, right It'e worth wakin* f or. Always wel
coim. Never shirke ita wprk. Nc -r fail*. Never
wawes minute, er materiel« and I *> m> it'» pure and
wholesome, aa.Calumet contains only auch ingredient»
« hare i*en' approved officially by the U S. Food
HIGHEST ft £2
Üt* 1
\
NEW MARKETS AND
THE MERCHANT MARINE
Washington. March 8 —The Re
publican Publicity Association, thra
its president, Hon. Jonathan Bourne.
Jr., today gave out the following
statement ' from its Washington
"Among the problems of the
headquarters:
greatest importance in the future
commercial and industrial success
of the United States is that of devel
opment of a merchant marine of auf
ficient magnitude to carry the bulk of
our foreign trade. Since we have
been and shall continue to be an ex
porting nation, our chief problem 1.
to And new, larger, and more prof
»table markets for what we have to!
sell, so .hat the net returns to the
American producer shall be as large
as competition in the markets of the'
induce him to become a regular con
sumer of our products. Second we*
must brine the foreign
g the : foreign transporta
tion system to the door of the Amer
ican producer. We must do this for
the convenience of the domestic deal
er and in orderto Induee hlm .n
. . , I,* l ? induce h,m to look
to foreign fields for a regular market
for a part of his output.
.
When we have a foreign trans
portatlon system that extends from
the warehouse of the American pro
ducer to the warehouse of the for
elgn buyer in every part of the
world, we shall be in a position
develop our selling trade to that ut-i
most practicable extent. As a result
of the establishment of such a trans
portatlon system we shall undoubt
edly buy more extensively abroad,!
but the purchases will be transported
In American ships whose owners and
operatores will be agents for build
lng up of American trade and whose
operating expenses will be incurred
chlefly in America, where the trans
portatlon profits will be retained. Un-!
der such a correlated system we shall
Bell more and at a better profit • we
shall buy more and at better ad'van-i
tage, and we shall «ave the freight
charges we have heretofore paid to
the owners of foreign shins.
"In seeking new markets even If
world will permit.
"To find new and larger markets
for our products, several undertak
ings are essential. First, we must
place our goods on sale In new mar
keta even if we must do so at a loss
during the period of introduction.
This we must do for the convenience!
of the foreign buyer and in order to
we must do so at a loss In the be
Binning,we shell do nothing more nor
less than is done by every large bus
ine8S concern and by every Railroad
company building Into new territory.
To introduce hia goods, the manfsc
tnrer senda salesmen into territory
* h8r ® the immediate sales do not pay
the expenses of the "drummers." But
, . . . ... ..
future business resulting from the
initial expense Justifies the under
taking. To bring new traffic to its
lines a railroad builds a branch into
territory that has Uttle population,
little industry and little trade. But
the establishment of transportation
, . , . , .
,aeUIU * 8 brin8 » peop,e ' indu8try * nd
trade ' J w,tb rMultant returM to tbe
ra " road on itB venture.
' Exa f t,y "> e 8ame enda are be
accomp lah * d »y the establishment
regular ocean transportation line*
belWeen thl * COBIUry and foreign
ports where we have little, if any,
trade at present, but where we can
reasonably expect to find an outlet at
.. ., . ,
profitable prices for the products of
American farms, mines, factories and
other activities. In this transition
period In particular, when all the
... .. A ,
world is making new adjustments of
trade, It is of vital Importance that
we put our products on foreign mar
keU ahead of competitors If possible.
»„ j _ , ' . . . ,
And we mu,t not only h« but
POI1Btant purveyors of American pro
ducts. Our foreign transportation
i inoo „««..».a
„„ ? ! operated on regular
BChedules and correlated with rail
transportation so that the plow man
„facturer, for Instance, in Illinois
n ail . . h( , , ,
can ft8Certall> ,n his ,oca * railroad of
flee at what time and at what cost he,
can ship a carload of plows to Pales
tine, if he has an inquiry from that
section of the world for hls product.
When such servlcg has been estab
tojlished. we shall enter upon a new era
if commercial expansion.
■ ■ ; ,
BRIGHT OUTLOOK FOR
WESTERN LIVESTOCK MEN
■■■■
°* deB - Marcb 8 — Anticipation
tbat the 8nla " packing companies of
the United States will arrange to
continue In the export business.start
ed dur,n * the war - and will probably
™ d ^elr trade; that the demand
for nH3at products will continue In
Bur °P e ,or two years or more and!
tbat - eve «» it the minimum price for
h ogs '« officially rembved that the
P rice s will remain as high or be
higher la expressed by Ogden live
! atock and packing, men. These are
the o P lnlons stated after a very com-i
prehensive review of the present situ
ation, national and international.
The demand for pork continues as
!»• « r "" b "
the-war business. While certain em-1
bnrgoes have not been lifted as yet,
the demand for shipments to Europe
has Increased. Through the Ogden
market, a considerable amount of
this demand is being filled. In the
past week, there bas been Blightly In
,,™„ ter „„„ on,e.
Ogden livestock market, due princi
pally to this demand. Finished ani
mais are the ones that are bought
i» nd hrina tha oirtro «riaa.
and nrmg the extra prices.
Adjustment of freight rates for
dressed meats now being taken up
with the federal railroad adminis
tratloi. hv Utah «h inmira «h. n .u.h .a
tratlon by Utah shippers through the
Utah traffic bureau, is being given
consideration by Director General
Hines. The proposals are such that,
if the adjustments are made
outlined,
as
the Eastern outlet* for
dressed meats will be increased and
there will be even greater demand
than ever before.
Condition of the livestock indus
try in the intermountain states Is de
clared by Ogden Liveatock men to be
splendid.
With prospects of good
prices, abundant feed, sufficient mois
ture for all crop, and no difficulty a.
to labor supply, the western
stock men face a prosperous year, ae
cording to the views'held at this
.
WITH "OLD GLORY" IN FRANCE
- Mules are In favor as draft animals
'« "• — ». M country
and In western Europe. The exports
during the war, undoubtedly for wari
purposes, were about 360,000 mules
in place of a normal export of proba
bly 22.000.
by the war department numbered
about 29,000 mules, and at about
the end of 1918 approximately 106.
000 were in the service of the war de
partment In this country. Therefore,
nearly 600,000 mules, the Bureau of!
Crop Estimates says, were supplied
to the war department and the allies
by the farms of this country for war
service.
market.
HALF A MILLION U. S. Mi l,EH
The shipment overseas
Comparison ot mules with draft
horses Is interesting. The war de
partment shipped overseas about
29,000 mules and 38,000 draft horses
of both of which only 600 were let
on route. That department bought
29,000 mule. In France, Great Brit
aln. and 8pain, and 123,000 horses
for all purposes, the draft horses not
being separately reported. On De
cember 26, 1918, there were on hand
with the American Expeditionary
Forces 56,000 males and 110.000
draft horses, and the war department
bad on hand November 8, 1918, 148,- i
000 mules and 186,000 draft her«*.
»
Why Colds are Dangerous,
You are often told to beware of a
cold, but why? We will tell you:
f h 7vh^i\y and^re^h^wf y forThe
more serious diseases. People who
contract pneumonia first take cold. ;
Th e longer a cold hangs on, the
*£ eater th® danger, especially from
I the germ diseases, as a cold prepares
the system for thfe reception and de
velopment of the germs of consump
tion, diphtheria, scarlet fever and
whooping cough. The quicker you
get rid of your cold, the less the
danger of contracting one of these
diseases. Chamberlain's Cough Rem
edy has a great reputation as a cure
for colds and can be depended upon.
It is pleasant to take.
Order Appointing Time and Place for
I Proba '? K '* Will, «.d Directing
Publication of Notice.
j the ProbMe Court of the Coun .
t y of Bear I-a'ke, State of Idaho:
In the matter of the estate of Eitz
abeth Knutti, deceased.
!. * „ m \ J.'V?,, he . tb 5*
: last will and testament of Elizabeth >
Knutti, having on the 26th day of
February, 1919, came into the poa-.
session of said probate court, and a"
£*"!*" ****••^? ba 'f the . re ° f ' and I
for the issuance of letters testamen- '
t^ry to Michael Knutti having been j
filed by the said Michael Knutti, it is
fi er °hy ordered that Monday, the 10th j
day ° f Jf ar ' b ' 191 ?: at 11 °' c,ock a ;|
of said da>, at the court room of
8ald court in Paris. County of Bear ;
Lake, State of Idaho, be and the i
same la b «reby appointed the time j
and Place for proving said will, and i
hearlng „, d appllcat | on , when and
where any persno interested in said
estate may appear and contest said
wiU and may fl,e objections in wrlt
ing to the granting of letters teatsr
men tary to aald peti tion. And It U
further ordered that notice be given
thereof by the Clerk thereof by publl
cat, o n ot a c °P y of thl ® order In the
pÄ and ÄbSd ln âuSiïZS
not less than three weeks,
J. H. GRIMMETT,
2-28-3t Probate Judge
The Nevada-Hawthorn Copper Mln
* n ff Co., principal place of business
" 0 " tp ^'* r ; Idabo - " ln ® located In
j Notice Is'hereof given & that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
; the Nevada-Hawthorn Copper Mining
i Cwnpany held on the 4th day of Feb
!«.^pay
doing assessment work for the year
1916. one-half mill per share, was
lev *® d on the capital stock of the cor
! Saîlbl"" immediate"^ "aÄ*
berg, Secretary, in the city of Mont
j pelier, Idaho.
! A " y »tock upon which the assess
day March 20, 191*9, P wü^be^delln
j quent and advertised for sale at pub
| * ic auction, and unless payment
' ™ ad ® before, will be sold on Thurs
: K i.V
pelier, Idaho, to pay the delinquent
assessment thereon, together with
advertisement and
° **
h'OTIt'K FOR PUBLICATION
_ . -
u 5 Œ"'ÎÜÏÂÂÎ: '
ruary 8, 1919.
Notice is hereby given that Chloe
P® rk,n8 of Mmitpelier, Idaho, who
May i Bt ' 1016 ' tnade homestead
try No. 020646, for SE14 NW%
j NE % SW<4, secton 13, township 13
I sou lh, range 44 east, Boise Meridian,
! I 1 ,? 8 fl,ed noUce ° f Intention to make
1 hree-year proof, to establish claim to
the land above described, before M.
B. Cherry, United States Commission
er, at Montpelier, Idaho, on the 24th
-lay of of March, 1919.
Claimant names as witnesses:
William George, Fergus Brown,
Lisle Bissegger and Jesse A. Perkins,
all of Montpelier, Idaho.
2-14-6t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 4
IK
expense
C. G. SPONGBERG, •
Secretary.
j
1
on
en
J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. 8.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho, Feb.
*1. 1919.
,, rl Notlce 18 her ehy given that Roy
ou X j°£}' *28 iTlT^de to^sTead
llve-!entry No. 014702, for E% NE%,
NEK SE%, section 18; NW% NW%
8 ® ction township 11 south, range
44 east, Boise Meridian, has filed
j tice of intention to make three year
! proof, to estahlfsh claim to the land
above described, before M. B Cherry,
'-'nltod States Commissioner, at Mont
pelier, Idaho, on the 12th day ot
91
i.'J'.'"«™™...
Claude Tippets and Ambrose Black
aU ot Georgetown, Idaho,
2 -28-rt J. T. CARRUTH,
— * ' Register,
!
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i
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no
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Our meat is fine,and
Y LL BE BOUND -
w That voulu
BE PLEASED
VhTH EVERV
Pound J
vA
*r
EVERY POUND OF MEAT
, ... , _ x
et J?™« 8
»unees of real, solid en
S i Lo some faimly. And
L ^ A"® 0 by T *
T. hich We conduct
, The correctness of _
e î, • ChooiTul 8p°tU>88ne88
pit Ut u 18 mar K et ,®^P e ^
wh ? H e mindful of the
lllce ^ le ® 0k
H H. HOFF MF AT TO
i 41 U IlUrr 1UCA 1 W«
e mun
our
our
The Examiner is only $8.00 • year.
»
;
Headquarters
For Puré Groceries
WE HANDLE ONLY GROCERIES AND FOOD
STUFFS THAT YOU MAY ABSOLUTELY DE
PEND ON AND IN ADDITION YOU ALWAYS
GET AS
>
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;|
;
i
j
i
j
LOW PRICES
i
A8 ARE OBTAINABLE IN MONTPELIER
WE RECOMMEND TQ YOU OUR
Modern Meat Maket
"where the best meats, poultry, fruits and vegetables
are always for your selection.
W. J. Crockett Merc Co.
Successors to F. 0. Hansen Company
Edwin L. McClave
W. H. Smith
If You Want to Buy
HOME
a
a farm or a lot to bnild on, we have some
that are very cheap and some that can be
had on very easy terms. WHY PAY
RENT.
We sell Life, Health and Accident, Fire
and Automobile Insurance, that is relia
ble.
We have money to loan on irrigated
part irrigated land at 8 per cent, no com
mission charged.
Invest in real estate and see it grow in
value. Montpelier is the place to invest
Buy insuranoe and let the other fellow
worry. Come in and talk it over and see
if we can't save yon some money.
or
BEAR RIVER VALLEY UNO & ABSTRACT 00.
Department of the Interior, U. 8.
[Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho, Feb.
U '"'
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Notiee is hereby given that Eliza
beth Teuscher of Geneva, .Idaho, who,
on April 29, 1914, made homestead
entry No. 016938, and on September
10, 1916, made additional homestead
entry No. 020962 for 8E%, Sec.
32, township 12 8.. range 46 east;
lots 2, 3 and SE % NW%, Eft 8W%
Sec. 6, NE% NWH Sec. 8, townahlp
13 8., range 46 east, Boise meridian,
has filed notice of Intention to make
Three year proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, United States Commis
sioner, at Montpelier, Idaho, on the
17th day of March, 1919.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Alma Eschler of Bern. Idaho, Alt.
Swa of Raymond, Idaho, and Arnold
D. Hirschi and Alfred Bischoff of Ge
neva, Idaho.
2-7-6t
J. T. CARRUTH, Register
NOTICE FOR PUB1JCATION.
Department of the Interior, U. 8.
Land Office at Blackfoot, Idaho, Feb.
1. 191».
Notice is hereby given that Frantz
F. Nielsen of Wayan, Idaho, who.
on May 16, 1916, made homestead
entry No. 019613, and on October
20, 1916, made additional home
stead entry. No. 022192, for S% SE>4
Hoc. 20; NWK SW14, 8% SW14 Sec.
21; N% NWK Sec. 28 and NW*4
NE *4, Sec 29, township 6 south,
range 44 east, Boise meridian, has
filed notice of Intention to make
Three year proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, United States Commis
sioner, at Montpelier, Idaho, on the
17th day of March, 1919.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Louis Kunz, Abel Kunz, August
Schmid and Garrett W. Somsen, all
of Williamsburg. Idaho.
2-7-6t
J. T. CARRUTH, Register
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Notice is hereby given that William
F. Cozzens of Montpelier, ffiaho, who.
on October 23. 1916, made home
stead entry No. 621289, for 8%
NWV1, 8WK SWK, Sec. 17; EH
NEH, EH SE K. 8ec, 18; NBH
NEH. section 19, township 14 south
range 46 east. Boise meridian, haa
filed notice of intention to make final
three-year proof, to estobllah claim
to the land above described, before
M. B. Cherry, U. 8. Commissioner, at
his office in Montpelier, Idaho, on the
19th day of March, 1919.
Claimant names as witnesses: ^
Jacob Kunz, Joseph R. Salveeen
and John Manni, all of Montpelier,
Idaho, and Roy Twiss of Raymond.
Idaho. J. T. CARRUTH,
Register.
t
Almost any woman can make her
husband tremble by merely saying
that she just heard something about
When a young Ban takes a pretty
girl for a boat ride, he la seldom oou
tent with hugging the shore.
The Examiner is only 88 ■ year.
John Black
w
agent for Singer Sewing
machines. Full line of sup
plies always on hand. Sec
ond-hand machines
in exdiange for new ones.
•Phone' 153-J
E. E. HINCKLEY.
Physician
and Surgeon
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat a flprslaltj
Hoars 10 to 12 and 2 to 6
Office over Modern Drug Co
MONTPELIER, -
- - -IDAHO
H. H. KING, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon
SURGEON O. S. L. RY.
Office over First National Bash
Office Phone 809
Residence Phoae 1U
MoatpeUer
020. F. ASHLEY
Physician and Surgeon
MONTPELIER. IDAHO
Office hours: t* to 18; t to 4; f U »
Phones 62 and 63
All Calls Gives Prompt tirtfttirr
harry V.FLYNN
DENTIST
Parlor* ha BNbih R Devis Bldg.
lt*4
OFFICE PHONE NO. 4«
DR. H.
Graduated tu Europe sad United
E
Phoae
Oflee Over Bunk of Montpelier
» to U; X to •

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