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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, July 11, 1919, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1919-07-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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'*— -"SLIER EXAMINER
P. B. WRIGHT, Editor and Proprietor
Published Every Friday
Montpelier, Friday, July 11, 191».
PCT MONTPELIER ON HAP
entertainment accorded them,
\ the free advertising they will give
the city will redound to its benefit.
' CLÂHH,^OR COALESCENCE ? 1
With the return of the President
to the United States, the Treaty of
Peace which he as chief delegate
from this government has been In
strumental in framing, passes tech
nically from his hands Into those of
the United States Senate. He has
exercised the power conferred upon
him by the Constitution to "make"
the treaty; it now becomes the pre
rogative of the upper house of Con
gress, two-thirds of the members
present concurring, to indicate its
"advice and consent" in the matter
of ratification. No matter how per
fect or popular the document may be,
It cannot be made effective, so fir
as this country is concerned, until
the senate has acted upon it.
Thus far Mr. Wilson has acted in
the matter without much regard to
the co-ordinate branch of the gov
ernment, but he cannot afford to pur
sue that policy of aloofness any
longer. He now has the opportunity
and has Indeed direct occasion, to
display at home some of the qualities
of conciliation and tact which he Is
admitted to have conspicuously dem
onstrated at Versailles. He cannot
expect that the present majority in
Congress will scan his work with an
always fond and uncritical eye. He
must be prepared for some manifes
tation of that resentment which Is
not unnaturally felt by many Sena
tors because of the feeling that where
their advice and consent might prop
erly have been sought, they have
been deliberately Ignored. He must
recognize that their responsibility
now becomes as great as his, and he.
must also be fair enough to credit
them with a patriotism as sincere,
and perhaps a sagacity as profound,
as his own.
The important question then Is,
how will the President approach the
Senate, and in what terms and spirit
will he, in laying before them the
result of his labor, ask for their ap
proval of it? If is easily within his
power, by taking a broad, high
minded course, to conciliate and
Bmooth and satisfy a more than suf
ficient number of the Senators to
carry hte treaty through the stormy
waters which Its out-and-out ene
mies are preparing to deluge It
withal. On the other hand, a display
of impatience with the legislative
branch of the government, a reserved
standlng-apart from them, an Imper
ious demand that the work of his
hands be accepted exactly as he pre
sents it, without any of the Interpre
tations or reservations which many
experienced statesmen feel will help {
and not harm the treaty and which
certainly will not constitute a re
jection of lt
may easily create an Impasse be
tween the White House and the Cap
itol that would be regrettable and
disastrous. By taking the former
course, the best opinion Is that the
President can secure an early rati
fication of the Treaty with the Lea
gue of Nations covenant Included.
By taking the latter course, there is
the certainty of long delay, and even
the grave possibility of such changes
and amendments as shall amount to
a practical rejection of the Treaty in
its present form.—Deseret News.
display of this spirit
WAR HERO HAS ARM BROKEN
WHEN THROWN FROM HORSE
Wm. Harris of Pocatello, was
brought to the Montpelier hospital
last Saturday morning with both
bones of his left forearm broken.
The accident occurred on the Fourth
at Chesterfield and was caused by
being thrown from a horse.
Young Harris only recently re
turned from France where he was
in the thickest of the fighting for
several weeks, even experiencing the
horrors of six days without food, as
he was a member of Co. O, 808th
infantry, which was a part of the
famous "lost battalion."
He
caped without a scratch,
tainly one of the strange things in
life.
'It Id cer
he said, "to go through what
I did in France and then come nearly
being killed by being thrown from
a cayuee.
■O
Ice cream aoda Is a popular in
present
terior decoration at the
stage of the game.
There Isn't a department store
earth large enough to supply
thing a woman wants.
on
every
1
GARAGE AND GOAL. HOCHE
DESTROYED BY FIRE
The coal house and garage at the
rear of E. L. McClave's residence
was destroyed by fire on the evening
t ly 4th. The fire is believed
e been started by boys playing
matches. An automobile in
trage was saved but trunks,
and other personal effects be
g to Mr. McClave, which
in the garage, were burned.
Taylor also lost some, valuable
and papers. Mr. McClave
s his loss at $400. Had the
wind been blowing from the
It would have been a difficult
to have saved Mr. McClave's
nee.
were
It sometimes happens that when a
man takes a rest he takes something
that he Isn't justly entitled to.
All classes of plumbing and sewer
connections made; prices reasonable
and all work guaranteed.—Wm. Pen
dery, phone II.
{
It isn't the doctor you need—it's the plumber.
F. J. Peterson
SANITARY ENGINEER
Plumbing and Heating Contractor
JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
Rear Gem State Lumber Company.
MONTPELIER, IDAHO
MONEY to LOAN
ON CULTIVATED FARMS
Quick and Efficient Service
F. W. FAUTECK
DOWNEY. IDAHO
A
«
SERVICE, STATION
;
the
seen
a
! ing
! an
the
Copyright registered. 1919
J
Would You Run on a Flat Tire?
Suppose your front tire went flat ten mile*
from home.
You would not bang and bump along after
you knew that every turn of the wheel war
tearing the life out of the casing.
Why not be as reasonable about y oui
battery ?
The penalty for mistreating a battery is
just as sure as for abusing a tire. The care
is just as easy.
Drive into our Service Station and let us
tell you just how easy it is.
;
j H»e
i
the
seen
plays
i takes
ï the
j with
; a
j
1
girl
ily
and
she
graph
next
seen
ern
The
next
Level."
:
ft
We test, repair and re
charge storage batteries,
and always carry a full
supply of battery parts,
new batteries and rental
batteries.
» /,
Idaho Electric Co.
1
Montpelier, Idaho
Wednesday night a number of
men were sent out by the forest
supervisor to fight a fire which is
raging at the head of Georgetown i
canyon.
be under control this morning.
The fire was reported to .
It's a man's outgo
havoc with his income.
that plays
Yes, the world may owe you a
living, but you will starve to death
if you sit down and wait for it to
come and settle.
YOU WI LL BE PROUD OF IT
When you hear the So
nora you realize that
you are listening to the
iRSHR most beautiful toned
instrument you have
- ever heard. it plays
H 8 HH all makes of disc rec
ords. Come in and
I make your own terms
NIKLHEN FURN. CO.
I 'The Old Reliable."
i
s
■V
:
.
House Dresses
and Aprons
Our house dresses and aprons
are created for women whose
taste demands the best in Style,
Fit and Workmanship.
Mary Newton dresses for the
children in pretty patterns of the
fast color standard ginghams are
attractive and you may be sure
the quality will more than please
you.
9
Brennan & Davis
:
:
t
DO YOU REALIZE THE PLEASURE IN
Owning a Kodak?
a
¥
7
ft;
*
%
Every Kodak we sell is at fac
tory prices and our instruction
and guidence is free and wil
lingly given.
t
ill
I
f •
Ï
%
• , ï
!
Kodak Store
I
y 'iM
tt
Kodak Store

MONTPELIER
IDAHO
PICTURES THAT WILL
PLEASE MOVIE FANS
Manager Brough offers some good
attractions for the movie fans during
the coming week. Tomorrow, Sat
urday night, Fannie Ward will be
seen in "Common Clay," a Pathe
special feature in seven parts. It is
a gripping, senaatlonal and interest
! ing play of modern life, with a wom
! an as the victim. It awakens in the
breast of the spectator that pity
which Dr. Gilbert Murray says "is
the Kingdom of Heaven within
us
; fighting against the brute power of
j H»e world." It Is a picture with a
i force and meaning.
Next Monday night Mary PIckford
the popular .screen actress, will be
seen In "The Little Princess." Mary
plays the role of Sara Crewe, moth
erless daughter of Capt. Crewe of
India, who leaves her in a London
under
boarding school, while he
i takes s diamond mining venture in
ï the east. Sara's adventures in thé
school provide her with an intensely
appealing role.
Gladys Leslie, Vftagraph's star
with the "million dollar smile," has
a role well suited to her charming
versatility in ''Miss
Dixie," in which she is a Southern
girl who comes North to end a fam
ily estrangement of Civil War days
and succeed«, and also wins the man
she loves and a fortune. This Vita
graph picture will he the attraction
next Tueeday night.
Wednesday night Tom Mix will ha
seen in an Intensely interesting west
ern picture "Fighting for Gold."
The program for the night will alao
include a Sunshine comedy entitled
"Damage No Goods."
Fannie Ward will be seen again
next Thursday night in "On the
Level." a Paramount feature.
a
Dulcie From
a.
be
Pure life Insurance protection at
reasonable coet; see 8. N. Kuna.
KontpeMsr; phone 888.
WELL KNOWN COUPLE
MARRY AT BRIGHAM CITY
The marriage of two of Bear Lake
county s well known young people
is thus recorded by the Brigham City
Journal:
"At the home of Mr. and Mtb. Will
R. Holmes, 306 So. Main street,
the evening of July 4th, Bishop H.
W. Valentine united
on
in marriage
Clawson Skinner of Nounan, Idaho,
and Mias Edna Bowen of Brigham.
The ceremony was performed In the
presence of Immediate relatives. The
bride Is the daughter of B. H. Bowen
of this city, and for the
past year
has been employed as stenographer
and bookkeeper at the Hansen Fur
niture & Music company store,
is a bright young lady,
groom is the son of Bishop and Mrs.
Nephi Skinner of Nounan, Idaho, a
graduate of the Fielding Academy,
Paris, Idaho, and recently
from France, where he
months of active service in the bal
loon squadron.
She
The bride
returned
saw several
Mr. Skinner left for
his Idaho home last evening,
young bride will leave in a few days
—Just as soon as the Hansen Fur
niture & Music
His
company can secure
take
a competent stenographer to
her place.
-o
TEACHERS' EXAMINATION
Notice is hereby given that
July 24, 26, and 26, 1919, there
will be held at the county court
house at Paris. Idaho, the regular
July teachers' examination. Such 1
examination will commence at 8*30 j
a. m. of each day. AJ1 applicants I
seeking Idaho certificates of any I
grade should present themselves for !
this examination. All prospective
teachers of the county MU8T be
tified prior to drawing salary
teachers. Indorsement subjects win
be given on the last day of the dates
above mentioned.
on
uer
as
S. H. SPENCER,
County Supt. of Schools.
-o
The Examiner 88.00 par year.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Estate of Thomas McCammon, de
ceased.
Notice Is hereby given by the un
dersigned Louisa McCammon, admin
istratrix of the estate of Thomas Mc
Cammon, deceased, to the creditors
of and all persons having claims
against the said deceased, to exhibit
them with the necessary vouchers,
within ten months after the first
publication of this notice, to the said
administratrix at Georgetown, county
of Bear Lake, State of Idaho.
Dated July 2, 1919.
4J , . LOUISA McCAMMON.
Administratrix of the estate
Thomas McCammon, deceased.
of
7-4-4t
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Estate of Lars Peter Nelson and
Marla Nelson, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the un
dersigned administrator at the estate
ot Lars Peter Nelson and Maria Nel
son, deceased, to the creditors of and
all persons having claims against
the said deceased, to exhibit them
with the necessary vouchers, within
ten months after the first publlcsion
of this notice to the said admlnistra
*° r a > h 's residence in Montpelier.
Ph. i° f Bear Lake ' 8ute o* Idaho,
this being the place fixed for the
transaction of the businees of said
estate.
Dated June 3, 1919.
CHRIS 0L80N,
First publication July
1
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MODERN DRUG CO.

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