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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, February 27, 1920, Image 2

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"DANDERINE" STOPS
HAIR FALLING OUT
Hurry! A few cents will save your
hair and double its
beauty.
n
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(c
A little "Dauderine" cools, cleanses
and makes the feverish, itch; scalp
soft and pliable; then this stimulating
tonic penetrates to the famished hair
roots, revitalizing and invigorating ev
ery hair in the head, thus stopping the
hair falling out, getting thin, scraggly
or fading.
After a few application of "Dander
ine" you seldom find a fallen hair or a
particle of dandruff, besides every hair
shows more life, vigor, brightness, color
and thickness.
A few cents buys a bottle of de
lightful "Danderine" at any drug oi
toilet counter.—Adv.
Professional Loss.
Ills friend noticed that the dentist
was looking blue and inquired, "What's
the matter Joe?"
"Why, I've had an ulcerated tooth
and yesterday It got so bad I had to
pull it myself."
"Did yon get relief?"
"Oh, yes."
"Then why this grouch?"
"Why this grouch? Because, you
Idiot, I once got $400 for treating a
tooth like that"—Boston Transcript
CONVENIENT!
If Constipated, Bilious or
Headachy, taka
Cascarets.

» »
Cascarets never gripe, sicken or In
convenience one like Salts, OIL Calo
mel or harsh Pills. Feel bully ! Be effi
cient! Don't stay sick, bilious, head
achy, constipated. Remove the liver
and bowel poison which is keeping yonr
head dizzy, your tongue coated, yonr
breath bad and stomach sour. Why
not spend a few cents for a box of
Cascarets and enjoy the nicest, gentlest
laxative-cathartic yon ever experi
enced? They work while yon sleep. Adv.
No Life Saver.
"1 asked the boss for a raise today;
told hlm I couldn't live on my present
salary."
"Fine, and what did he say?"
"That he didn't think a man in hts
position should be considered merely
as a life saver."—Lexington Leader.
NAME "BAYER" IS ON
GENUINE ASPIRIN
Take tablets without fear, if you see
the safety "Bayer
Cross."
If yon want the tine, world-famous
Aspirin, as prescribed by physicians
for over eighteen years, yon must ask
for "Bayer Tablets of Aspirin."
The "Bayer Cross" Is stamped ob
each tablet and appears on each pack
age for yonr protection against Imi
tations.
In each package of "Bayer Tablets
of Aspirin" are safe and proper direc
tions for Colds, Headache. Neuralgia.
Toothache, Earache, Rheumatism
Lnmbago, Neuritis, and for Pain in
general.
Handy tin boxes containing 12 tab
lets cost but a few cents. Druggists
also Bell larger "Bayer" packages. As
plrin Is the trade mark of Bayer Man
ufacture of Monoacetlcacidester ol
Sallcyllcacld.—Adv.
Things to Be Reckoned With.
"There are no sure things In life,"
Sighed the pessimist.
"Oh yes, there are," argued the phi
losopher. "How almut tlie expenses
you hadn't counted on?"
RECIPE FOR GRAY HAIR.
Ts half pint of water add 1 oz. Bay Rum,
k small box of Barbo Compound, ami %
or. of glycerine. Apply to the hair twice a
week until it becomes the desired shade.
Any druggist can put this up or you can
mix it at home at very little cost. It will
gradually darken streaked, faded gray hair,
and will make harsh hair soft and glossy.
It will not co'or the scrip, is not sticky or
greasy, and docs not rub off.—Adv.
Business.
Reno—He always rubs it into the
people, frienfls or no friends.
Henry—Always knocking, eh?
Reno—No; he's an osteopath.
Important to Mothoro
Examine carefully every bottle of
CASTORIA. that ramons old remedy
for infanta and children, and see that If
Signatured
In Use for Over 30 Years.
Children Cry for Fletcher's Castoria
An Inquiry.
"Who are you?"
"A seeker after truth?"
"Had any luck so far?"
COMPROMISE RAIL f
SILL IS ADOPTED
THE ESCH-CUMMINS MEASURE IS
APPROVED BY THE LOWER
HOU8E OF CONGRESS.
Members are Warned by Supporters
That Defeat of Measure Would Put
Half of Roads In the Hands of
Receiver Within Three Months.
Washington.—The compromise Esch
Cummins railroad bill was approved
late Saturday night by the house,
which adopted the conference report
after four hours of debate. The house
adopted the conference report by a
vote of 250 to 150—a clean margin of
100 votes.
Adoption of the conference report
came after the house had defeated.
223 to 171. a motion to recommit.
Chairman Esch of the interstate com
merce committee, in charge of the fight
on the floor, then called for the previ
ous question and there was a buzz in
the chamber as the voting began.
There never was any doubt as to
the outcome, leaders said, although
the effect of pressure from labor lead
ers against adoption of the bill was va
riously Interpreted. Representatives
Kitchen, Democrat, North Carolina, in
(he closing argument against tjie bill,
declared that labor leaders had caused
at least n dozen members who were
opposed to it to rally to its support
During the debate, in which more
than a score of representatives took
part. Chairman Esch declared that the
roads would be handed hack to their
rwuer* on March 1, regardless of wheth
er congress enacted legislation mean-,
while, but he warned the house that
defeat, of the bill at this stage would
put half the roads of the country in
the hands of receivers In three months.
Representative Pou, Democrat, North
Carolina, painted a more gloomy pic
ture by declaring that the country
would see the greatest financial disas
ter in years if it gave up the railroads
without enactment of laws which would
give them the right to earn a fair
return.
Railroad administration estimates
place the net cost to the government
of federal control of the railroads at
$636,000,000. Chairman Esch of the
interstate commerce committee, told
the house in opening debate on the con
ference report on the compromise rail
road bill.
•This $636.000.000 will have to be
charged off as a war loss," he said.
"One may say 1J was expensive, but
it was worth the price. Without the
railroads, transportation: would have
failed to supply our troops overseas."
GCMPERS AGAINST LABOR PARTY
bays It Would be Detrimental to the
Interests of Labor.
Washington.—Formation of a polit
ical labor party would be "detrimen
tal to the interests of labor and ex
actly in line with that which Is most
ardently desired by those who seek
to oppress labor," Samuel Gompers
declared in a letter to William Mitch
of Terre Haute, ir-a».e public here
Sunday.
Mr. Gompers wrote in .reply to a
telegram from Mitrti and his associ
ates supporting tlie action of the In
diana state Labor party In opposing
the political declaration of the Amer
ican Federation of I,abor, calling on
organized workingmen to elect their
friends and defeat their enemies.
Mitch's telegram declared In favor of
making the flght^ solely through a
labor party.
a
Proposes Farm Credit System.
Washington.—A system of co-opera
tive farm credit, based on personal
security as distinguished from mort
gage loans, is proposed in a bill intro
duced by Representative McFadden,
Republican. Pennsylvania. Loans on
personal security would be secured by
farmers from "community" banking as
sociations having stock subscribed by
farm members. There would be a cen
tral hank with $25.000,000 capital
loaned by the government and also
state branche*.
Labor Party Seeks Funds.
Washington.—The American Federa
tion of l^ibor. to make effective its
nation-wide campaign for the election
of a congress and state legislatures in
sympathy with organized labor and Its
slms. is preparing to Issue an appesd
for funds.
England Financially Sound.
London.—Great Britain ts fundamen
tally sound, both flnuucially and com
mercially. says the American cham
ber of commerce of London in a state
ment referring to difference in the
financial position of Great Britain and
the continental European countries.
Noted Physican Killed.
Alton, 111.—Dr. Harry E. I»emens.
formerly private physician to the Em
peror of Japan, was killed and his six
teen-yenr-old duaghter, Snsan. injured,
when an automobile,in which they were
riding collided with a train.
Searching for Poisoned Olives.
Chicago.—Federal and state food in
st retors In fifty-two towns of eight
sta'es are making frantic efforts to lo
cate and destroy dozens of bottles of j
ripe olives containing the deadly tuctl- j
lus botulinus
TO REVIVE INTEREST IN STEEPLECHASING
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WmœÊmBÈSÊSÊk
Wettern Newspaper Union
BBS
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Plains to revive interest in both amateur and professional steeplechasing
were considered by a special committee appointed at a meeting of more than
one hundred horsemen under the auspices of the National Steeplechase and
Hunts association.
The army's interest in the sport was indicated by the presence at the
meeting recently held in New York of four officers from the general staff at
Washington. Various speakers declared tliat the weignts were too low, the
fences too small and the races too short. Many speakers asserted that the
Jockey club did the sport an injustice by not allowing open dates for the
hunts meetings instead of having them conflict with racing at different tracks.
The low scale of weights was held to blame for the fact that certificates
were issued to only 25 amateur riders last season.
The photograph shows three horses taking a hurdle at the Plumpton
course, England, and is remarkable inasmuch as it shows the three horses in
midair at the same time.
FAVORS LEGIONNAIRES
The boys of the American Le
gion are not regarding Jack
Dempsey with favor, since he
managed to evade military duty
in the great war. They are right
Carpentier. the Frenchman,
wears the honors of distin
guished service and we are with
the legionnaires. We hope he §
will knock Jack's block off.— a
George M. Bailey in Houston 1
Post.
5
BEZDEK STILL IN BASEBALL
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Hugo BezdeK. former mauager of
the Pirates, says he is not out of base
ball. although he was dismissed as
manager. This is taken to mean that
he hopes somebody else will offer him
a job. Bezdek was a successful scout
before becoming an unsuccessful pilot.
COURTNEY RETAINS POSITION
Has Devoted 35 Years to Development
of Oarsmen at Cornell—Assisted
by Hoyle.
Although he is seventy years of age
Charles E. Courtney still retains his
position as rowing coach at Cornell
university, where he has devoted 35
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Charles E. Courtney.
j looking forward with keen interest to
j the 1920 races. He will be assisted by
years to the development of oarsmen.
A few years ago it looked as if the
veteran coach would have to quit, but
his health has improved, and he Is
loht Hoyle,
little: picm
- orspocT •
Harvard has built 13 squash, ten
nis and racquet courts.
Wesleyan, Conn., has recognized goll
as a minor college sport
The Murphy stable has won $785,000
in purses during the last nine years.
Iron wood, Mich., is after the 1921
National Ski association's tournament
National league baseball nines used
17,676 baseballs during the 1919 sea
son.
*
George Sisler will outdo Cobb as a
hitter this year, according to St Louis
fans.
• • •
Yale probably will accept an invi
tation to send a track team to Eng
! land.
*
*
The Yankees it is said, have spent
$250,000 for players in the last few
years.
! C. W. P. Reynolds has been re
engaged as football coach by Bucknell
I college.
• • •
J Three members of the Iowa football
I team have refused appointments tc
West Point.
• • •
Harry Shrlver, pitcher, has been
turned back to Saginaw for another
I year by Providence.
*
Jim Tho
dares he
leagues or nowhere.
great Indian star, de
ill play In the major
Ti
Cniversity of Wisconsin has offered
University of Washington a date on
its 1920 football schedule.
• • •
The Indians are favored in the
winter book to win the American
league pennant this year.
• • •
Memphis Country dub has been
awarded the western amateur golt
championship tournament.
• • •
George Trafton. center of the Notre
Dame football team, has been disquali
fied for playing pro "football.
Miller Huggins will soon make an
other effort to coax Frank Baker into
playing baseball another year.
New York A. C. athletes won 18
national and 30 district Amateur Ath
letic union championships last year.
• • •
Harvard football players have elect
ed Arnold Horween of Chicago captain
of the Crimson eleven for next year.
• • •
The New York A. C. athletics won
18 national and 90 district Amateur
Athletic Union championships last
year.
!
The Harlem and Heights Athletic
'eagne, of New York city, has set aside *
a fund of $1.000 for the promotion ot i
sports.
Hnrollton. Ont., is to have a modem !
stadium for athletics. The by-law au- I
thorizlng the expenditure was passed J
at the recent election.
I
.
A series of exhibition games has i
been arrange*! between the Washing- I
ton American league and Indie capo! is j
American Association dubs.
Jack Price, a former winner of the
Powderhall (Scotland) Marathon, has
challenged Alfred Shrnhb for a match i
at 15 miles. Shrubb is coaching the j
Oxford university crosscountry team. [
*
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J COMPARISON OF BOXERS \
0
*
*
0
Dempsey.
0
0
.387 Ib« J
. « ft. 1% in J
.78 In $
.42 in. 0
.46 In 4
.17 in. J
. 8 Vi in. .
.23 in. 0 I
.13 Vi in. 4
.II ln. J
.S in. 9
9 w«t*ht .
J Height .
0 Reach .
$ Chest, normal .
0 Chest, expanded
J Neck .
\ Waist .
0 Wrist .
0 Thigh .
4 Biceps .
J Calf .
j Ankle .
Carpentier.
t
0
0
J Weight .
0 Height.
0 Reach .
* Neck .
J Chert .
0 Biceps .
0 Forearm ....
0 Waist .
9 Thigh .
J Calf .
_171 lbs. #
I ft. ÿ V* in- 0
. Si in. 0
_15 V« in. 4
. 40 Vs in- J
.11 in.
.29 in
.23* in
-15* in J
Carpentier is 25 years old, 0
0 while Dempsey is 24.
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HOW NEALE BECAME 'GREASY'
Ease With Which He Evaded Tack
lers in Football Games Caused
Him to Be Nicknamed.
Earle ("Greasy") Neale, right field
er of the Cincinnati champions, while
at college, like Christv Mathewson,
w. b.,,., know. ». » <oo.b.n PI»,.
er than as a diamond athlete. He was
a halfback and one of the best broken
field runners who ever played the
game In the middle West.
The manner in which he evaded
tacklers In his runs with the ball
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Earle Neale.
caused him to be likened to a greased
pig, and in that characterization lay
the origin of the nickname "Greasy,"
which has clung; to him ever since.
For the past few years he has spent
the fall months coaching small col
lege elevens in the middle West
INTERNATIONAL SPORT CLUB
Applications to Number of 5,000 Have
Been Made for Admission
"Founder*."
as
lt Is reported that some 5.000 appli
cations have been received for admis
sion as a "founder" in the Interna
tional Sporting club of New York, the
new private boxing organization of
that city. To be one of the founders
costs $500 if the application is fa
vorably acted upon by the board of di
rectors.
HARVARD WILL PLAY CENTER
Kentucky College, Which Aroused
So Much Football Talk, Haa Big
Game in East.
Center college, which aroused
much talk in football last year, will
go East next fall and take the gridiron
against Harvard. The game has been
scheduled for Oct. 23. It was arranged
after the University of Illinois found
it Impossible to make the trip.
so
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\ SEASON OPENS APRIL 14
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The championship season in 4
* the American league will open J I
J on Wednesday April 14, the • ,
! * d , a,e • readr cl T eD , bv thp Na « !
j tlonal league. The oM schedule • '
J of 154 games will be played In ,
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RULE FOR CARRYING PLAYERS
! Southern Association Basebell Teams
I May Play Nine Veterans, With
J Six Recruits. 1
!
. A rule under which nine veteran
i players with class A experience end
I six less experienced men may is» ear
j ried next season on the roster of each
Southern Association baseball
team
was adopted at an executive session of
the annual meeting of the association
i Deal Gets Toumey
j England will hold the open go»
[ championship at Deal next summer.
END OF EIGHT
YEARS MISERÏ
I
Used Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound
and Recovered.
Newark, N. J.—"The doctor said I
had an organic trouble and treated me
m i f TT MHI I IHII II ir ; H for lmnl weeks,
lil At times 1 could not
walk at all and I
suffered with m y
."JM back and limbs so I
BSLy &|9 often had to stay in
. MM bed. I suffered off
BK|ji ;4Rf and on for eight
years. Finally I
heard that Lydia EL
Pinkham's V e g e
table Compound was
a good medicine and
tned it with splen
did effect. I can now do my house
work and my washing. I have recom
mended your Vegetable Compound
your Blood Medicine and three of my
friends are taking them to advantage.
You can use my name for a testimonial. "
-Mrs. Theresa Coventry, 76 Burnett
St, Newark, N. J.
;
,11
and
Yoi an invited t® write for free advice
No other medicine has been so ane
ceasful in relieving woman's suffering
iÄSS
and Q pfu i »dyke by writing the Lydia
E. Pkikham Medicine Co., Lynn, mas.
Such'lettera are received and answered
by women only and held in strict
confidence,
BETTER
DEAD
> Life is a burden when the body
is racked with pain. Everything
worries and the victim becomes
despondent and downhearted. To
bring back the sunshine take
COLD MEDAL
Tbs national ramady of Holland for over
200 yaara; it ia an enemy of all paina re
sulting from kidney, liver and uric acid
troublea. All druggists, three aires.
Leah lee *e
Cell Medal
'a
Reduce* Strained. Puffy Ankles.
Lymphangitis, PaO Evil, Fistula,
Boils, Swellings; Stops
and allays pain. Heals Sores, Cats,
Braise*. Boat Chafes, k is a
AF SAFE AITISEPTIC AID 6E8II6IBE
Does not blister or remove the
hair and horse can be worked. Pleasant to me.
\ 42.50a bottle, delivered. Describe your ««s
; for special instructions and Book 5 R free.
ABSORBIN' E. JR„ urtacpOc_
Saco Strain«. fttifal. KaaecS. Swollen Veto
S1.2S per book at Seien or Sclirered.
W. F.YOUNG. P. D. F.. SIITmsU $t„ Serln#fl«H. Haas.
Cuticura Soap
The Velvet Touch
For the Skin
Ssap 2Sc, OwtaMi* 2S —d 50c, Tslc—25c.
w. N. U., Salt Lake City, No. 9-1920.
Miles Standish Was Manxman.
Evidence that Miles Standish waa
a Manxman and bom into the Manx
family of Standish of Ellanbane, has
been discovered by the secretary of
the Isle of Man Antiquarian society.
The family of Standish probably came
to Man with the Derby family in the
fifteenth century, it is stated, for there
is a record that they held property
in the capital of the island in the year
1511. This was seventy-three years
before Miles is supposed to have been
bom.
YOUR COLD IS EASED
AFTER THE FIRST DOSE
"Pape's Cold Compound" then breaks
up a cold in a few
hours
Relief comes Instantly. A dose taken
every two hours until three doses are
taken usually breaks up a severe cold
and ends all the grippe misery.
The very first dose
opens yonr
*• clogged-up nostrils and the air pass
J ; ages lu the head, stops nose running,
J relieves the headache, dullness, fever
, ishness. sneezing, soreness and stiff
J I Don't stay stuffed np ! Quit blowing
• , and snuffling! Clear yonr congested
« ! head ! Nothing else in the world gives
• ' such prompt relief as "Pape's Cold
, compound." which costs oniy a few
- *»>■ « *«
ness.
J out assistance, tastes nice, contains no
+ quinine—Insist upon Pape's!—Adv.
The Difficulty.
'T*oes your boy Josh know anything
T"!' l "'" l* 1 «« 1 ought to lie run?"
, 1 " snv ,H " answered Farmer
1 Comtossel -
*TU sav he knows all
! about it. The trouble seems to be that
l**?, hitV ' 1 UM,n und 1 ar *' 1,11 luh 1«
| " Ut lB8, ™cttons as fast r.s Josh
™ n 81 v< * '" ra "
Night and Viornlif.
Hmrm Strang. Healthy
Eye*. If they Tire, Itch,
Smart or Burn, if Sore;
Irritated, Inflamed or
_Granulated, *<* Murine
pteH- Soothe*. Refresh««. Safe for
^"tor Adult. At all Druggists. Write for
r tee Lye Book.
j
!
J
Brèves
EpIraMtCa.

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