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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, November 25, 1921, Image 2

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on.
In
cold
new
She
of
AManfor
the Ages
A Story of the Builders
of Democracy
By Irving Bachelier
Copyright, Irving BacholiT
CHAPTER XX.
Which Tells of the Settling of Abe
Lincoln and the Traylors In the Vil
lage of Springfield and of Samson's
Second Visit to Chicago.
BIm's Judgment of her old friends
was 111 founded. It was a slow time
In which she lived. The foot of the
horse, traveling and often mired In a
rough muddy highway, was Its swift
est courier. Letters carried by horses
or slow steamboats were thp only
media of communication between peo
ple separated by wide distances. So
It Is easy to understand that many
who had traveled far were as the
dead, In a measure, to the friends they
had left behind them and that those
separated by only a hundred miles
had to be very enterprising to keep ac
quainted.
In March Abe Lincoln had got his
license to practice law. On hls return
from the North he had ridden to
Springfield to begin hls work as a law
yer In the office of John T. Stuart.
Hls plan was to hire and furnish a
room and get hls meals at the home
of hls friend, Mr. William Butler. He
went to the store of Joshua Speed to I
buy a bed and some bedding. He |
found that they would cost seventeen
dollars.
"The question is whether you would I
trust a man owing a national debt and I
without an asset but good Intentions |
and a license to practice law, for so
much money," said Honest Abe. "1
don't know when I could pay you."
Speed had heard of the tall repre- |
sentatlve from Sangamon county.
"I have a plan which will give you I
a bed for nothing if you would care to I
share my room above the store and |
sleep with me," he answered.
"I'm much obliged, but for you It's |
quite a contract."
"You're rather long," Speed laughed.
"Yes, I could lick salt off the top 1
of your hat. I'm about a man and a
half but by long practice I've learned
how to keep the half out of the way |
of other people."
'Tm sure we shall get along well
enough together," i ald Speed.
Mr. Lincoln hul led away for hls |
saddle-bags and returned shortly
"There are all my earthly poBses |
slons," he said us he threw the bags
on the floor.
So hls new life began In the village
of Springfield. Early In the autumn I
Samson arrived and bought a small
house and two acres of land on the
edge of the village and returned to |
New Salem to move hls family and
furniture. When they drove along the I
top of Salem hill a number of the |
houses were' empty and deserted, their
owners having moved away. Two of I
the stores were closed. Only ten faml
lies remained. They stopped at Rut- |
ledge's tavern, whose entertainment
was Uttle sought those days. People
front- the near houses came to bld I
Pete and Colonel, Invigorated by I
their long rest, but whitened by age
and with drooping heads, drew the
wagon. Sambo and the small boy rode
between Sarah and Samson. Betsey |
•na Josiah walked ahead of the wag
them good-by.
Herbert, aged four, was Irritated by |
the crying of sister Harriet, aged two.
"Why don't you stop crying?" he
asked hls sister with great serious
ness. "You must be sick. You don't
look well, and you don't sound well I" |
8ound Reason.
Something Needed.
"There is some great force lacking In
this country today," an exchange says.
That's so. brother, but what Is It?
Frequently we have thought that It's
a foolklller who will remain perma
nently and actively on the Job.—Bos
ton Transcript.
Pretty Custom of the Past
It was the custom of the ancients
to bury the young at morning twi
light; for, as they strove to give the
softest Interpretation to death, they
Imagined that Aurora, who loved the
young, had stolen them to her em
braces.
Old-Fashioned Armor.
Men have used body armor of some
kind since earliest days. Except In
withstanding several balllsUc tests,
neither our modern plate nor our
padded armor seems to be much Im
proved over the old helmet and corse
let
Call for a Conquering Hero.
Man has conquered the air, the In
p»n« and the elements, and has sub
dued the bear and other wild animals.
There ought to be some way of tarn- |
pig the auto, since be has to liv« with
IL—Minneapolis Tribune.
Positive Sou roes.
TUe positive force of writing or of
meech must come from positive
Smc«— ardor, energy, depth of feel
ET? thought.—Ulgglnson.
per
If
as
to
on. the latter leading a cow. That
evening they were comfortably settled
In their new home. When the beds
were set up and ready for the night
Sarah made some tea to go with the
cold victuals she had brought. Mr.
Lincoln ate with them and told of his
new work.
Betsey waa growing tall and slim.
She had the blond hair and fair skin
of Samson and the dark eyes of her
to
he
[
a
!
the
a
So
the
ac
his
to
law
a
He
to I eldest son. "He's got a good heart in
He | him."
m
li]
'in
r
"Thera Are All My Earthly Posses
sions," Ha 8ald.
mother. Josiah had grown to be n
bronzed, sturdy, good-looking lad,
very shy and sensitive.
"There's a likely boyl" said Sam
son as he clapped the shoulder of hls
"You'll spoil him with praise,"
Sarah protested and then asked as
I she turned to the young statesman,
and I "Have you heard from Blm or any of
| the Kelsos?"
so
"1
"Not a word. I often think of
them."
"There's been a letter In the candle
| every night for a week or so, but we
haven't heard a word from Harry or
you I from them," said Sarah. "I wonder
to I how they're getting along In these
and | hard times."
It's | could do anything to help,
assured them. ,
Late In November Mr. Lincoln went
"I told Jack to let me know if I
Samson
top 1 out on the circuit with the dlstin
a gulshed John T. Stuart, who had
taken him Into partnership. Blm's
way | letter to him bears an Indorsement on
well
hls | circuit and remained unopened In out
| —A. Lincoln."
bags
Its envelope as follows:
'•This letter was forwarded from
Vandalla the week I went oat on the
office until my return six weeks later
The day of hls return he went to
Sarah and Samson with the letter.
"HI get a horse and start for Chi
said Sanv
I cago tomorrow morning,
small son. "They have had a double blow,
the Did you read that Harry had been
to | killed?"
and
the I claimed. "You don't mean to tell me
the | that Harry has been killed?"
their
of I but we don't believe It," said Samson,
faml- "Here's the article. Read It and then
Rut- | I'll tell you why I don't think It's so."
People
bld I November the fifth,
•Before we had read that article we
by I had received a letter from Harry
age dated November the seventh. In the
the letter he says he Is all right and I
rode calculate that he ought to know as
Betsey | much about It as anyone."
wag
Harry killed !" Mr. Lincoln ex
"The Chicago Demdfcrat says so,
Abe Lincoln read the article.
"You see It was dated In Tampa,
said Samson.
"Thank God 1 Then It's a mistake,"
said Lincoln. "We can't afford to lose
Harry. I feel rather poor with Jack
by | Kelso gerne. It will comfort me to do
two.
he
serious
don't
I" | ney and set out early next morning
with hls son, Josiah, bound for the
new city. The boy had begged to go
and both Samson and Sarah thought
it would be good for him to take a bet
ter look at Illinois than hls geography
what I can for hls wife and daughter.
I'll give you every dollar I can spare
to take to them."
Samson hired horses for the Jour
In
says.
It?
It's
perma
afforded.
Joe and hls father set out on a cold
clear morning In February. They got
to Brimstead's In time for dinner.
Henry put hls hand on Samson's
pommel and said In a confident tone:
"El Dorado was one of the wickedest
cities in history. It was like Tyre and
Babylon. It robbed me. Look at that
pile of stakes."
Samson saw a long cord of stakes
along the road In the edge of the
meadow.
"They are the teeth of my city,"
said Brlmstead in a low voice. 'Tve
drawed 'em out They ain't goln' to
bite me no more."
"They are the towers and steeples
of El Dorado," Samson laughed. "Have
any of the notes been paid?"
"Not one and I can't get a word
from my broker about the men who
drew the notes—who they are or
where they are."
•Tm going to Chicago and if you
wish Hi try to find him and see what
he says."
"That's Just what I wish," said
Hls name is Lionel Da
vis. Hls address Is 14 South Water
street I sold him all the land I had
on the river shore and he gave me hls
note for It"
"If you'll let me take the note I'll
see what can be done to get the
ancients
twi
the
they
the
em
some
In
tests,
our
Im
corse
In
sub
animals.
tarn- | Brlmstead.
with
or of
positive
feel- money," Samson answered.
"Bay, I'll teil Brlmstead want
n. "It's for five thousand dollars
anil 1 don't suppose lt'a worth the pn
per it was wrote on. You take It and the
If you find It's no good you lose It just 0 j t
as cnreful aa you can. I don't want
to see It again."
to
kins
They had a happy half-hour at the I ^er
tulile, Mrs. Brlmstead being In better ing-pin
spirits since her husband had got back xhe
to hls farming. Annabel, her form way
filling with the grace and charm of j p er
womanhood, was there and more
comely than ever. I
They had been speaking of Jack
Kelso's death. I
"I heard him say once that when I j^d
he saw a beautiful young face It re-1 of
minded him of noble singing and the
odor of growing corn," said Samson.
"I'd rather see the face," Joe re
marked, whereupon they all laughed
and the boy blushed to the roots of
his blond hair.
"He's become a man of good Judg
ment," said Brlmstead.
Annabel's Sister Jane, who had
and
cident
the
dren.
a
strong
a
clung to the wagon In No Santa Claus j|] £e
was a bright-eyed, merry
hearted girl of twelve. The boy Rob- of
ert was a shy, good-looking lad a little
than Josiah. good
•11, what's thfe news?" SamBon | an(
of
Land,
in
**^fothln' has happened since we
saw you but the fall of El Dorado,"
Brlmstead answered.
"There was the robbery of the mall
stage last summer a few miles north
of here," said Mrs. Brlmstead. "Every
smltch of the mall was stolen. I
guess that's the reason we haven't had
no letter^ from Vermont In a year."
"Maybe that's why we haven't
heard from home," Samson echoed.
"Why don't you leave Joe here
while you're gone to Chicago?" Anna
bel asked.
"It would help hls education to
rnssle around with Robert an' the
girls," said Brlmstead.
"Would you like to stay?" Samson
told
out
be
from
neer
help
n
hls
read
me.
asked.
"I wouldn't mind," said Josiah who,
on the lonely prairie, had had few
companions of his own age.
So It happened that Samson went
on alone. Near the sycamore woods
he came upon a gray-halred man lylnp
by the roadside with a horse tethered
near him. The stranger was sick with I
Samson got down from hls but
I of
a
and
I prayed for help [
to
of
as
of
a fever,
horse.
of
we
"What can I do for you?" he asked.
"The will of God," the stranger
feebly answered.
and you have come. I am Peter Cart
wright, the preacher. I was so sick
and weak I had to get off my horse
and He down. If you had not come I
think that I should have died here."
Samson gave him r.ome of the medi
cine for chills and fever which he al
ways carried in hls pocket, and water
from hls canteen.
"Is there any house where I could I
find help and shelter for your' he
asked presently.
"No, but I feel better—glory to
If you can |
or
I
had
on
out
but
from
the
God!" said the preacher,
help me to the back of my horse I will
Rty to ride on with you. There Is to
be a quarterly meeting ten miles up |
the road tonight. Nothing shall keep
me front my duty. I may save a dozen |
souls from Jtell—who knows?"
Snntson was astonished at the iron
will and holy zeal of this iron-hearted,
strong-armed, fighting preacher of the |
prairies of whom he had heard much.
He lifted him and set him on the back
to
Chi
Sanv
blow,
been
me
then
so."
we
Harry
the
I
as
"God blessed you with great I
strength," said the latter. "Are you a |
ex
of hls horse.
so,
Christian?"
"I am.
They rode on In silence. Presently I
Samson observed that the preacher
was actually asleep and snoring In
the saddle. They proceeded for an
hour or more In this manner. When
the horses were wallowing through a |
swale the preacher awoke.
"Glory be to God!" he shouted. "I
am better. I shall be able to preach I
tonight. A little farther on Is the |
cabin of Brother Cawklns. He has
been terribly pecked up by a stiff-J a
necked, rebellious wife. We'll stop |
a
Aa a Counter Demonstration. 1
there for a cup of tea and If she raises
a rumpus you'll see me take her by
the horns.
Mrs. Cawklns was a lean, sallow,
stern-faced woman of some forty
years with a face like bitter herbs ;
her husband n mildmannered, shiftless
man who, encouraged by Mr. Cart
"Tight, had taken to riding through j
the upper counties as a preacher—a
course of conduct of which hls wife
heart il y disapprov ed. Solicited by her
lose
Jack
do
the
go
bet
spare
Jour
/
cold
got
tone:
and
that
stakes
the
city,"
'Tve
to
steeples
"Have
word
who
or
you
what
said
Da
Water
had
hls
I'll
the
id
\ \
I
'//
✓ ot*
A
'i,
its
Wf\
o
>" Ti. - w
Y »
want
husband she sullenly made tea for tin
travelers. When It had been druu
the two preacher« knelt In a corue.
0 j t he room and Mr. Cartwright begai.
to pray In a loud voice. Mrs. Caw- !
kins shoved the table about and tipped j
^er the chairs and dropped the roll
ing-pin as a counter demonstration |
xhe famous circuit rider being In no |
way put out by this, she dashed a dip- j
p er 0 f o-olcl water on the head of her
husband. The praying «topped. Mr.
Qartwright rose from hls knees and
commanded her to desist. On her
declaration that she would not he laid
j^d gf ^ woman and forced her out
of ^ door and c i 0 eed and bolted It
and resumed hla praying.
Having recorded this remarkable In
cident In hls diary, Samson writes:
"Many of these Ignorant people in
the lonely, prairie cabins are like chil
dren. Cartwright leads them on like
a father and sometimes with the
strong hand. If any of them deserve
a spanking they get It. He and others
j|] £e uim have helped to keep the cabin
people dean and going up hill Instead
of down. They have established
schools and missions and scattered
good books and comforted sorrows
| an( j kindled good desire in the hearts
of the humble."
As they were leaving, Mr. Cawklns
told them that the plague had broken
out In the settlement cm Honey creek,
where the quarterly meeting was to
be held, and that the people had been
rapidly "dyitf off." Samson knew
from this that the smallpox—a
dreaded and terrible scourge of pio
neer days—had come again.
"It's dangerous to go there," said
Cawklns.
"Where Is sorrow there Is my
proper place," Cartwright answered.
"Those people need comfort and the
help of God."
"I got a letter from a lady there,"
As nigh as I can
Cawklns went on.
make out they need a minister. I can
read print handy but wrltln' bothers
me. You read It, brother."
A
tion
was
said:
I dead. It Is a good deal to nsk of you
but If you feel like taking the chance
I of coming here I am Bure you could do
a lot of good. We have doctors enough
and It seems a pity that the church
[ should fall these people when they
need It most. If you have the courage
to come you would win the gratitude
of many people. For a month I have
been taking care of the sick and up to
now no harm has come to me.
"Yours respectfully,
"BIM KELSO."
Mr. Cartwright took the letter and
read as follows:
"Dear Sir: Mr. Barman gave me
your riQtne. We need a minister to
comfort the sick and help bury the
really
it
duals
invest
ment
rities
ly
to
ngly
that
on
ness
velop
their
for
is
lic
I Cartwright,
felt that He was leading me.
"I begin to think that He has been
leading me," Samson declared.
| Kelso Is the person I seek."
"I would have gone but my wife
took on so I couldn't get away," said
" 'A man's heart devlseth hls way
but the Lord dlrecteth hls steps,' " said
'For three days I have
Blm
| Cawklns.
| you and I will pry the devil out of her
| north,
'Til come, back some day soon and
wlth the crowbar of God's truth and
mercy," Cartwright assured him as he
and Samson took the road to the
On their way to the Honey creek
settlement the lion-hearted minister
told Of Swimming through flooded
I rivers, getting lost on the plains' anil
a | suffering for food and water, of lying
down to rest at night In wet clothes
with no shelter but the woods, of hand
I to-hnnd fights with rowdies whe en
deavored to sell drink or create a dls
In turbance at hls mfeetlngs. Such was
the zeal for righteousness woven by
many hands Into the fabric of the
a | West A little before sundown they
"I
I he knew where they could find the
| nurse Blm Kelso,
a white dress that takes keer o' the
| sick?" the man asked.
"I guess that would be Blm," said
Samson.
"She's over In yon' house," the oth
er answered, pointing with hls pipe to
a cabin some twenty rods beyond
them. "Thar's two children sick thar
an' the mammy dead an' buried In the
ground."
"Is the plague getting worse ?"
Cartwright asked.
"No, I reckon It's better. Nobody
has come down since the day before
yestlddy. Thar's the doctor cornin'.
He kin tell ye."
A bearded man of middle ago was
approaching them In the saddle.
"I am Peter Cartwright—the
preacher sent of God to comfort the
sick and bury the dead," said Sam
son's companion.
"We welcome you, but If you stop
here you will have to stay until the
epidemic Is over."
"That I am prepared to do."
"Then I shall take you where you
can find entertainment, such as It Is."
"First, this man wishes to speak to
Miss Kelso, the nurse," said Cart
wright. "He is a friend <*f hers."
"Yon can see her but only at a dis
tance," the doctor answered. "I must
keep you at least twenty feet away
from her.* Come with me."
They proceeded to the stricken
1 house. The doctor entered and pres
ently Blm came out Her eyes filled
j ear8 nn d for a moment she could
by not B p ea ) {
"Why didn't you let me know of
your ^^^8?" Samson asked,
"Barly last summer I wrote a long
; letter to you," she answered,
.< It didn't reach me. One day In
j une the stage was robbed of its mall
j down in Tazewell county. Your letter ,
wife
her
reached the settlement.
Samson asked a man In the road if
"Po ye mean that angel o' God hi
w
»
was probably on that stage."
"Harry's death was the last blow. I
my
a
La France Hosiery
!
j
|
|
j
Pure thread, twelve strand
Japanese tram silk, free from
artificial weighting—clear in
its lustrous sheen—luxurous in
its softness guaranteed against
garter runs by its patented
construction. La France silk
hosiery ia a delight to women
of taste an ideal Christman gift
Brennan ÔC Davis
Home of Quality Merchandise
> !
( <
K'A
TAXES HOLD BACK BUSINESS
A conslse and effective condemna
tion of the existing taxation system
was made by Senator Smoot when he
said:
Our present income tax system is
really taxng the individuals who are
actively engaged In business while
it forces oùt of taxation the lndivi
duals having great wealth.
By driving men of great wealth to
invest their big Incomes In govern
ment bonds and other tax free secu
rities the present system not mere
ly fails to reach property that ought
to be taxed. It brings a correspond
ngly heavier burden on the property
that is reached for taxation.
By concentrating heavy taxation
on the men actively engaged in busi
ness it cuts down their abaltty to de
velop their business., It (hampers
their actlvty. It discourages their
undertaking new affairs.
Such an outcome Is bad for the
business men, of course. It is worse
for the workers whose employment
is taken from them and for the pub
lic which suffers from the high cost
Time to Order Your
Christmas Cards
Never before has a more elaborate line of Christmas
Greeting cards been assembled than the 1021 line now on
display in the Examiner office. We have in stock for
your inspection a nifty selection of popular priced cards
of various designs, and our sample books are crambed
with samples of the finest cards on the market.
Either engraved or printed. The Examiner plant is
well equipped to print Christmas cards in the finest man
ner, but to those desiring to pay a little more for engrav
ed cards .may place their order with us. Orders for en
graved cards should be left with us as early as possible.
Come in today and place your order. Delivery need
not be made bofer December 18. Make your selection
while our line is complete, or select your choice from our
samples.
I
? rr
For Desk or
Counter Use
w
(
Adding cash and charge sales on a Burroughs
Adding Machine saves you money for the business
and wins the confidence of your customers. On this
Work alone, the Burroughs will mdre than pay for
itself. And the same machine can be used for many
other figure jobs in the business.
All Burroughs Machines add, subtract, multiply
and divide in all kinds of business the world over.
Pocatello Office
L. W. Woodwin, Mgr.,
144 N. Arthur Ave.
Adding —Bookkeeping —Calculating
Machine*
B
K'A
of living resulting from lessened pro
ducion.—Kansas City Times.
"CLEAN-UP" SQUADS EFFECTIVE
Marked success has attended the
"clean-up" campaign Instituted by
the Veterans Bureau in which the
American Red Cross and the Ameri
can Legion are co-operating a report
from the Veteran's Bureau showing
that more than 84,000 former sol
diers have been interviewed by mem
bers of the various squads. As a
result, more than 36,000 claims for
compensation have been filed. Oi
this number only 3,000 cases are
pending, he remainder having been
adjusted. The clean-up squads have
visited more than 1,510 cities and
their work is rapidly nearing comple
ton. An appropriation of $310,000
was made by the American Red Cross
to carry out its part of the "clean
up" program.
Find Pleasure in Doing Good.
minds, like heaven, are
Great
pleased In doing good, though the un
grateful subjects of their favors are
barren In return.—Rowe.

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