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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, July 04, 1912, Image 2

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WOMAN AVIATOR I
FALLSTOHERDEATH
a
HAD PASSENGER WITH HER
1000 FEET HIGH WHEN THE
MACHINE FELL
Harriet Quimby and W. A. Willard Vic
tims of Accident Due to Wind—Turn
Over and Over—Boston Harbor Flight
—Fall Into Shallow Water and Are
Deeply Imbedded in Muddy Bay.
Boston, July 2.—Miss Harriet Quim
liy of New York, tho first woman to
win an aviator's license iu America, and
tho first woman to ctosb the English
cliunucl in an aeroplune, was instantly
killed, Monday evening with her pas
senger, VV. A. Willard, manager of the
Boston aviation meet, at Atlantic, when
lier Blériot monoplane fell into Dor
chester bay from u height of 1000 feet.
The accident happened when Miss
Quimby and Willard were returning
from a trip over Boston harbor to Bos
ton light, a distance of 20 miles in all.
The flight was made in 20 minutes. The
Blériot, ono of the latest models of
military aeroplane, circled the aviation
Held and soared out over the Savin Hill
Yacht club, just outside the aviation
grounds.
WASHINGTON BANKERS
ELECT OFFICERS
• Vf. J. Patterson of Aberdeen Is Made
President.
With the adoption of resolutions in
dorsing a number of national move
ments toward currency reform, election
of officers, and the spending of the
afternoon and evening in recreation,
the seventeenth annual convention of
the Washington Bankers' association
«nded Saturday at Tacoma. The con
vention voted to authorize the execu
tive committee to expend the necessary
amount toward education along agricul
tural lines in schools and colleges, and
voted to ask the legislature to appropri
ate additional funds for the same pur
fiose.
The officers elected are: President
W. J. Patterson, Aberdeen; vice presi
dent, W. H. Martin, Ritzville;
tary, P. C. Kauffman, Tacomu; treas
urer, C. K. McMillin, Bellingham.
Executive committee—J. E. Chilberg,
Woattlo; L. L. Crosby, Everett; R. R.
Rutter, Spokane; Ralph S. Stacy, Ta
coma; George P. Wiley, Watervillo.
Delegates to the American Bankers'
association—Miles C. Moore, Walla
Walla; George B. Burke, Tacoma;
Thomas II. Brewer, Spokane; N. B.
Coffman, Chehalis; I. D. Cornett, Top
ponish; V. A. Boeder, Bellingham; W.
Ci. Shuham, Waitsburg.
Alternates— W. R. Baker, Colville;
E. 11. Unupt, Ritzville; II. D. Hopkins,
l'ort Townsend; J. J. Rouse, Pullman;
J. 11. Smithson, Ellensburg; P. M. Ser
ruvier, Lynden; F. L. Stewart, Kelso.
Second member executive council
American Bankers' association, W. D.
Vincent, Spokane; vice president for
Washington, A. B. A., M. F. Backus,
Seattle; member nominating commit
tee, A. B. A., J. V. Spangler, Seattle.
secre
rBUIT DRYER AT GRANDVIEW.
Test Will Be Made of Invention to
Save Profita on Products.
An invention expected to aid the
fruit drying business will be given its
ffirst triul in the state of Washington
an Grandview during the fall.
Experiments have boon conducted in
San Francisco for a number of months
with the machine.
Electricity will replace the old hot
air arrangement and will effect
paving in fuel and labor in addition to
improving the finished product.
BIG FIRE AT SASKATOON, BASK.
Loss of Half Million—Six Firemen
Overcome By Smoke.
Saskatoon, Sask.—A disastrous firo
staged Suuday night in Ciarn's de
partment store, which was destroyed,
including the stock. The Bank of Com
merce building was ruined and tho Ca
nadian Pacific offices were badly dam
aged,
smoke.
Six firemen were overcome by
Loss, $500,000.
Badgers Will Picnic.
The first annual picnic to be given
by the Wisconsin Society of the Inland
Empire .will be given in Spokane at
Natatorium park. Everybody who has
ever lived in Wisconsin is invited to
bring their lunch and help celebrate the
day. Sports, dancing and speaking will
be the principal amusements. A roll
call of the counties in Wisconsin will
be called and the county having the
largest attendance will be the banner
county.
National Educational Association.
Discussion of the establishment of a
federal university to be supported by
government funds will be renewed at
the fiftieth annual meeting of the Na
tional Education association, which is
to be held at Chicago from July 6 to
12. The National Education association
is the largest organization of its kind
in the world, and not less than 50,000
are expected to be in attendance at
this meeting.
A bill pending in the New York as
sembly provides free spectacles or eye
glasses for the school children of
Greater New York.
I
I
WASHINGTON STATE
lief
that
level
tion
rob
and
all,
us,
a
tion
in
The
try
On
a
the
of
ing,
them
put
all,
able
on
of
ited
the
Alexander A. Dunphy, aged 71 years,
a pioneer of Spokane, died recently.
Water in the new city well at Gar
field wus struck at a depth of 336 feet.
There were 12,135 marriage licenses
issued in the state of Washington dur
ing the year 1912.
A. G. Moore, 82, a native of Arkan
nud for 15 years a resident of Dav
enport, died at his home recently.
Eleven carloads of cherries were
shipped from North Yakima to the
Chicago markets between June 20 and
30.
The state has $2,667,492 cash
hand. Receipts for last week were
$256,066, and disbursements were $261,
028.
on
to
of
Niue Indian boys and girls gradu
ated recently from tho Yakima Indian
reservation school at Fort Siincoe,
about 27 miles west of Toppenish.
The Wisconsin Society of the Inland
Empire will give its annual picnic at
Natatorium park, Spokane, July 11, aud
all former Budgerites are expected.
All convicts who have been working
on roads have been sent back to the
state penitentiary to make bags to
supply the demand of the farmers.
Fred Hoefel lies with a fractured
skull, his wife is unconscious and Mrs.
Christ Reiker is severely injured as a
result of an automobile accident Sun
day afternoon, when Christ Reiker 's
machine overturned on a piece of level
roud five miles west of Ritzville.
Writhing in an agony of pain and
seized with one convulsion after an
other, Mrs. Herman Eden, aged 35
years, wife of a wealthy Peone prairie
farmer, died near Spokane from eating
raisins, by mistake, which had been
treated with poison to kill squirrels.
Members of the state board of con
trol met in quarterly session at the
state penitentiary for the considera
tion of pardons, paroles and other mat
ters at the penitentiary this week,
such as the operation of the jute mill
and the newly established prison
school.
Professor Paul White, head of the
state college agronomy department,
ports the crop conditions on the college
experiment farm as being the best in
yeurs. The plans for tho present
son include the raising of a large
amount of seed for distribution through
out the state.
More than 300 delegates were pres
ent at the Christian Endeavor conven
tion at Tacoma last week. North
Yakima was selected as tho place for
holding the 1913 convention of the
Washington-Idaho Christian Endeavor
union. The Rev. E. A. Kiug of North
Y'akima is president.
E. C. Cleveland, a rancher near North
Yakima, was recontly tried and found
guilty iu justice's court of refusing to
obey the notice of Assistant Horticul
tural Inspector C. G. Hornor to prune
his pear and apple orchard to rid it of
pear blight. He was given a minimum
fine of $50 aud costs. The case will be
appealed.
A. F. Schmidler, assistant cashier of
the Fidelity Stato bauk at Uniontown,
left home June 20, presumably for
outing in the vicinity of Coeur d'Alene
und St. Joe, Idaho, and has not been
heard from Binco. The stockholders of
tho bank have made good a deficiency
of $3000 without disturbing the
serve fund.
A man working for a railroad com
pany is not expected to strain himself,
declares the state supreme court. Ira
Irvin was ordered to throw a handcar
off the tracks to get it out of the way
of a fast coming locomotive. The en
gino was closo. Irvin strained a hernia
and sued for damages. The court says
he can not recover because of contribu
tory negligence.
Frauds, tho filing of fako deeds and
inducing two aged and feeble men to
appoint designing relatives to the con
trol of their property arc charged in
a complaint made in the superior
court for Walla Walla county recontly
seeking to quiet title to 0500 acres of
tho Lamar estate. The suit is brought
by H. S. Jackson, administrator of the
estates of James Lamar and Joseph
Lamar, against Bessie Lamar, admin
istratrix of the estate of David Lamar,
David Lamar's estate being tho alleged
fraudulently transferred property of
James 0. and Joseph Latnar. The
amount involved is $120,000, represent
ing the annual proceeds from the es
tate for six years, withheld from Jack
son as administrator, and the land be
sides.
in
of
At
is
re
sea
R.
Ta
B.
W.
D.
for
der
an
re
to
the
its
in
hot
to
at
firo
de
to
by
at
to
the
AT SPOKANE THEATERS.
N.
was
At the Orpheum.
All this week:
Mrs. Louis James in "Holding a
Husband:" Marguerite Haney in B. A.
Rolfe 's tabloid musical comedy, "Tho
Leading Lady;" Empire Comedy Four,
America's funniest quartette; Pauline
Moran, singing comedienne; Aerial
Sherwoods, gymnasts; Paul and Mar
mion Stone, a bit of musical comedy in
a vaudeville way; Dare Brothers, ath
letic accuracy.
a
by
at
is
to
at
It costs an average of 18 cents a
school day per child to put the rising
generation of this country through the
elementary aud high school.
tion
at
•"Willie," said the mother sorrowful
ly, "every time you are naughty I get
another gray hair."
"Gee!" said Willie; "you must have
been a terror. Look at Grandpa.
as
of
in
! !
I WHAT DO WE REALLY KNOW
ABOUT THE TARIFF?
There are those of an unshakable be
lief that without a tariff protection
that falls little short of prohibition of
imports, this country would sink to a
level of social and industrial degrada
tion without parallel in the modern
world, and there are those who regard
protection in any form or degree as a
devilish device for enabling the few to
rob the many. These and all the in
termediate shades of notion, opinion,
and belief are prevalent, but what, after
all, do most of us, or perhaps any of
us, know of the facts of the matter?
The farmer is confident that without
a prohibitive duty on corn, on lard and
bacon, on cattle, vegetables, and dairy
products, our millions of fertile acres
would revert to their original condi
tion of prairie and woodland, and that
millions of agriculturists would wander
in doleful poverty seeking employment.
The flock-masters believe that free wool
would Bhortly make sheep in this coun
try as much of a rarity as are bison.
On the other hand, millions believe that
a "substantial downward revision" of
the tariff would greatly reduce the cost
of living, the prices of food and cloth
ing, rents and amusements, and enable
them to live well, pay their bills, and
put money in the bank. What, after
all, do most of us or even any of us
really know about the possible or prob
able or certain influences of the tariff
on industrial conditions and the prices
of commodities? Our present sources of
information and misinformation are lim
ited almost wholly to the outpourings of
political partisans and to the conflicting
assertions of selfish interests.—From
"The Need of a Tariff Board, or Com
mission," by Albert G. Robinson in
the American Review of Reviews for
July.
in
to
of
be
of
of
to
in
of
AUTO DASHES OVER HIGH BANK.
At Los Angeles Machine Falls 100 Feet
—One Woman Is Killed.
Los Angeles.—Mrs. Mabel Muir of
Denver is dead and four others, among
them Miss Ida Logsdon of Colorado
Springs, are more or less seriously
hurt, as the result of an automobile's
plunging over a 100-foot embankment in
Griffin park. Mrs. Muir was instantly
killed. MiBs Logsdon may die. W. R.
Allen, ono of the two men in the party,
is held in jail and may be charged
with manslaughter.
John II. Sullivan drove the machine.
Mrs. Stella Gilbert, a cousin of the
dead woman, completed the party.
The death of Mrs. Muir is the seventh
recorded through automobile accidents
due to speeding here in less than a
week.
The Volume of Corporation Business.
Big business is becoming tho dis
tinctive feature of American industrial
life. The census shows that just over
one-fourth of the manufacturing estab
lishments of the United States are un
der corporate control, but they do 79
per cent of the business. Only a little
moro than 1 per cent of the establish
ments produce more than a million dol
lars' worth of goods in a year, but
theso establishments do nearly 44 per
cent of tho business. These 3061 organ
izations (there were only 1900 of them
five years ago) aro divided nmong all
branches of industry. Not all of them
are trusts. The highest estimate of
such combinations is about 800, and
this is much padded, but the figures
shown do indicate that the large estab
lishment is growing more important.—
From "Big Business and the Citizen—
II," by Holland Thompson, in the
American Review of Reviews for July.
NO MORE TARIFF BOARD.
Lack of Necessary Funds Compels Its
Disbandonment.
The tariff board went out of exist
ence Saturday because congress had re
fused further money for its work.
The uncompleted data was turned
over to the president for the use of
committees of congress or any other
tariff revision agency.
The board was formed in October,
1909. It has made comprehensive in
vestigations of the difference in cost
at home and abroad of wood pulp and
paper, wool and cotton; also compiled
glossaries of numerous schedules.
TURKS ROUTED AT SIDI SAID.
Leave 200 Dead and Many Wounded
on the Field.
Another severe battle at Tripoli on
June 28 is described thusly: Acco-ding
to tho message, a whole division at
tacked the heights of Sid Said and
neighboring positions, where masses of
Arabs and Turks who had escaped de
feat the previous day were lying in
deep entrenchments, reinforced by a
heavy native contingent.
New Jersey Republicans Kick.
Jersey City, N. J.—Tho republican
county committee of Hudson county,
N. J., met here Saturday with the an
nounced purpose of indorsing President
Taft.
Instead of doing this a resolution
was passed by a vote of 699 to 21 de
claring Roosevelt the "only true re
publican," denouncing the Chicago
convention and asserting that the
president gained his renomination by
fraud. The Taft men left and a Roose
velt man was elected chairman.
a
a
North Adams (Mass.) Bums.
North Adams, Mass.—A fire has de
stroyed a large part of the business sec
tion of this city. The loss is estimated
at $300,000.
Tho first child labor law was passed
in Massacsusetts in 1876.
BUILD UP SMALL TOWNS
Inland Empire Editors Organize Press
Association and Will Boost Com
munity Development Idea.
of
a
a
to
in
of
of
us
of
of
in
for
The Inland Empire editors met in
of
to
Spokane just recently and organized
the Inland Empire Press association,
which proposes to hold annual meet
ings in Spokane and semi-annual con
ventions, possibly, at other points in
the Inland Empire. The next meeting
will be held in Spokane, either during
the Interstate fair or the Apple show.
"Community development," or the
perpetuating and building up of the
country towns and small cities was the
principal topic of discussion, and plans
were set in motion which will result
in much benefit to the towns and rural
communities of the Inland Empire.
Community Development.
E. C. Hole, a newspaper man of Chi
cago, took for his subject "Community
Development, or There is No Place Like
Home." He referred to influences
which have been depleting and killing
the country towns and explained the
reasons which had induced him, as
publisher of a lumber journal, to stir
up the local lumbermen to adopt more
progressive methods and to advertise
in their local papers and make that
advertising bright and aggressive. He
explained the broader "community de
velopment" idea, comprising all means
for the upbuilding of the country town
and perpetuating it as a desirable
place in which to live. Editors and mer
chants must cooperate to make their
town a better and more progressive
community and show the farmer the
local town is the place in whose pros
perity he should have the most concern."
The mail order business is taking a
great deal of money out of the local
communities; it is constantly growing,
and one of the principal reasons for its
growth is that merchants are not pro
gressive and do not advertise in the
local papers. In many communities
where we have made investigations we
have found that the banks alone have
sent out more money in drafts to mail
order houses than the local merchants
have deposited. In a large section of
the middle west the ' population was
less in 1910 than ten years previous.
The railroads have suffered from this,
and they are beginning to realize they
must get into closer cooperation with
the people living along their lines.
Howard Elliott has assured me there is
no subject closer to his heart than
community development. The mail
order business can not stand the right
kind of competition. Why do they not
sell their goods in Chicago? Simply be
cause they can't stand comparison with
the goods of reputable dealers. One
large mail order house offered $10,000
to be admitted to our principal mer
chants and business men 's organization
in Chicago, but it was refused; they
can't belong. We must ail take an
interest in and boost everything bet
tering country life. The high cost of
living is due principally to the fact
that there are too many people living
iu the cities and too few in the coun
try on the farms. Let the newspapers
exploit the country boy who went to
tho city a little less and the country
boy who stayed at home a little more.
The next speaker was W. G. Hollis
of Minneapolis, who explained what the
Natioual Federation of Retail Mer
chants' Associations hopes to -accom
plish. This organization aims to get
united and concentrated action on mat
ters of interest to all retail merchants.
Referring to "community develop
ment," he said boys leave the town
and go to the city "because there is
nothing doing in the small town;" it's
up to us to make something doing. The
decreased population in Iowa has come
neither from tho farms nor the cities,
but frotn the towns, and the depletion
of the towns is being brought about
by the mail order houses. Generally
speaking, when you buy from a mail
order house, "you get what you pay
for"—but not what you expect. The
Chicago mail order houses sell $200,
000,000 a year. They have a big buy
ing power, but they also have an enor
mous selling expense—from 24 to 28
per cent. The average cost of doing
business of the regular retailer will not
exceed 18 per cent. If a merchant is
progressive the difference between his
cost of doing business and that of the
mail order houses will fully offset their
buying advantage and ho can get a
good share of the business. It is time
the merchant, railroad man, jobber and
editor should get together to save the
small town.
One of the important things the fed
eration is working for is laws prevent
ing fraudulent advertising of all kinds
—this will put a crimp in the mail
order business.
of
in
R.
the
a
dis
over
un
79
dol
but
per
all
of
and
the
Its
re
of
in
cost
and
Resolutions.
The report of the committee on reso
lutions was adopted in substance ns
follows:
We heartily indorse the movement
now in progress for tho development
and upbuilding of the small cities,
towns and rural communities of the In
land Empire and pledge to said move
ment our earnest support.
Wo recommend the use and sale of
home made products in our several com
munities and the patronage of local
merchants and industries by all con
sumers.
We believe that the decrease in the
population of the farming sections and
rural communities is due in a consid
erable measure to the tendfency toward
the enlarging of individual farm hold
ings and to tho operations of the na
tional mail order houses. We urge,
therefore, a concerted and widespread
effort to reduce the size of the farm
unit, to encourage intensive farming
activities, and to give the most exten
sive publicity to the possibilities and
prospects that are opened to the legiti
mate homeseeker in our respective
communities.
We call attention to the fact that
money withdrawn from local circula
tion and sent to the distant mail order
houses represents a drain on the very
life blood of the particular community
concerned. It works an injury to the
merchant, to the wage earner, to the
property owner and to the farmer him
self, whoso holdings are always en
hanced in value through proximity to a
thriving trade center. We believe, if
developed to the full extent of their
apparent possibilities, the mail order
houses will ultimately destroy a large
proportion of existing small trading
on
at
and
of
de
in
a
an
de
re
the
by
de
a
centers, and thus deprive the farming
communities of access to social, reli
gious and education advantages which
can only be provided in cities and
towns.
We further believe that the
chan . ts of the sma11 cities and '°wns
are in a measure responsible for the in
roads of the mail order houses upon
their trade. Having the advantage of
immediate and personal contact with
their customers, they should, by adopt
ing modern merchandising methods and
through intelligent and persistent ad
vertising, be able to compete success
fully with said mail order houses.
We hereby pledge our earnest sup
port to any worthy project which has
for its object the honest development
of any section of the Inland Empire,
such as irrigation, good roads, etc., and
to discourage wildcat schemes and fake
boosting.
W'e urge the establishmeut of a per
manent news bureau for the gathering
of development news and exploiting
the resources of the Inland Empire.
We express our appreciation to the
Spokane Chamber of Commerce for the
excellent entertainment and the
fest sympathies of Spokane business
interests with the development of the
Inland Empire towns and communities.
We express our appreciation of the
presence of the chief executive of the
state, M. E. Hay, also E. C. Hole of
Chicago and W. G. Hollis of Minne
apolis, and H. C. Sampson of Spokane,
for their cooperation in advancing the
purposes of this organization.
As an expression of appreciation of
the work done by A. L. Porter, E. F.
Waggoner, E. E. Lucas and Philip Car
bary in bringing the editors here they
were elected honorary members.
The following committee was ap
pointed to suggest a uniform rate for
political announcements during the im
pending campaign: G. M. Allen, Top
penish; J. H. Johnson, Deer Park; J.
H. Taylor, Wilson Creek; R. S. Crowl,
chairman, Odessa; C. W. King, Bon
ners Ferry.
Motion carried that the committee
constitution and by-laws be the execu
tive committee.
Motion prevailed that a permanent
committee of five on "community de
velopment" ideas and methods be ap
pointed.
mer
a
is
an
of
to
is
28
is
a
mam
on
Banquet.
The convention ended with a banquet
tendered by the chamber of commerce
Food Law Decisions.
The United States department of ag
riculture, has issued the following
tices of judgments for violation of the
Pure Food law of June 39, 1996:
No. 1,304, against Trussing Bros.,
Montague, Mich., for adulterating and
misbranding cider vinegar,
condemned, but released to claimant
upon filing bond in $599.
No. 1,308, against D. J. Gregory Vine
gar Company, Richmond, Va., for adul
teration and misbranding
Goods condemned aud forfeited.
No. 1,316, against the llarbauer Mc
Lean Co., Toledo, O., for adulteration
of tomato catsup. Goods condemned
and forfeited.
No. 1,317, against six bales of coffeo
in possession of the Aragon Coffee Co.,
Richmond, Va., and shipped by W. II.
Force & Co., and Mitchell Bros., New
York City. Goods condemned and for
feited.
No. 1,320, against the New Blue Grass
Canning company, Owensboro, Ky., for
adulteration and misbranding of "to
mato puree," adulteration of "tomato
pulp," adulteration of "tomato cat
sup." Pleaded guilty and fined $25 and
costs.
No. 1,323, against the Teasdalc Fruit
& Net Products Company, Rogers, Ark.,
for misbranding evaporated apples.
Pleaded guilty and fined $10 and costs
No. 1,324, against Spiropoulos & Cos
talupes, San Francisco, Cal., for mis
branding spaghetti and macaroni. Fined
$50.
no
Product
vinegar
No.
1,325, against Stillman, Weight
& Co., Berlin, Wis., for misbranding
buckwheat flour. Fined $25.
No. 1,326, against A. C. Soper & Co.,
Farmingdale, N. J., for adulteration of
ketchup. Pleaded non vult,
suspended.
No. 1,329, against 225 cases of catsup,
packed for the Biklen Winze Grocer
Co., Burlington, la. Product condemned
and forfeited, but released to claimant
on payment of costs, and filing bond.
No. 1,332, against the Brewster Co
coa Manufacturing Co., Jersey City, N.
J., for adulteration and misbranding of
chocolate. Pleaded non vult, and fined
$109.
No. 1, 334, against the Harbaucr-Mar
lcan Co., Toledo, O., for misbranding of
798 cases of tomato catsup, found in
possession of the Stone, Ordean & Wells
Co., Duluth, Minn. Product condemned
and forfeited, but ordered released to
claimants on filing bond of $1,009 and
payment of $88 costs.
No. 1,338, against the Salem Canning
Co., Daretown, N. J., for adulteration
of tomato paste. Fined $5.
No. 1,349, against B. T. Chandler &
Son, Chicago, 111., for adulteration and
misbranding of apple cider vinegar.
Fined $190 and costs.
No. 1,352, against the Frazer Pack
ing Company, Elwood, Jnd., for adul
teration of catsup. Products ordered
condemned and destroyed.
No. 1,356, against the Earll Mfg. com
pany ; Kansas City, Mo., for misbranding
apple butter. Fined $50 and costs.
No. 1,358, against the Jersey Pack
ing Co., Cincinnati, O., for adulteration
of catsup. Product condemned and or
dered destroyed.
No. 1,363, against the Sharp-Elliott
Manufacturing Co., El Paso, Tex., for
misbranding vinegar. Fined $100.
No. 1,371, against A. E. Pearson &
Son, Lottsberg, Va., for adulteration
and misbranding of tomatoes. Goods
condemned, but ordered returned
claimant upon filing bond of $2,000.
No. 1,381, against the Atlas Preserv
ing Co., Baltimore, Md., for adultera
tion of tomato eatsup. Fined $20.
No. 1,391, against S. J. Van LUI &
Co., Baltimore, Md., for misbranding
preserves. (2 cases.) Fined $15
each case.
sentence
ns
of
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to
on
No. 1,361, against the Edward Wes
ten Tea & Spice Co., St. Louis, Mo., for
misbranding rice. Fined $100 and costs..
A workmen's compensation low en
acted by the Massachusetts legislature
went into effect July 1.
Every barber in Corsicana, Tex., is
a unionist.
OUR UNCLE SAM'S
BIG MONEY BOX i
THE U. S. GOVERNMENT SUR
PLUS WAS MORE THAN
$32,000,000, JULY I.
Better Off at End of Fiscal Year Than
Had Been Expected—But Less Than
Last Year—Failure of Congress to
Fans Appropriation Bills Helped to
Swell the Fund.
The federal government closed the
fiscal year June 30 with a surplus of
$32,000,000,. according to estimates
based on incomplete returns from the
various sources of revenue the country
over. This amount far exceeded the
expectations of Secretary MacVeagh,
who months ago estimated that the
surplus would be $10,250,000.
The surplus at the close of the fiscal
year 1911 was $45,682,000.
The failure of congress to pass gen
eral deficiency and other appropria
tion bills which would have called for
large disbursements during the clos
ing days of the fiscal year helped the
government to pile up the surplus.
Another big element in the figures
was the corporation tax, which, it
is calculated, brought in $27,000,000
against $33,000,000 last year.
Customs receipts totaled $310,000,000
this fiscal year against $314,000,000
last year, while internal revenue
taxes, amounted to $292,000,000,
against $289,000,000.
FROM THE MINING CAMPS
It is reported the British Columbia
Copper company's directors have de
clared a quarterly dividend of 15 cents
a share.
News of the death in Sonoma county,
California, of William Dixon, aged 73
years, a pioneer mining man of the
northwest.
The annual report of the Rambler
Cariboo mine at Kaslo, owned aud op
erated by Spokane people, indicates
that the property will be on a divi
dend-paying basis by next October.
Iu Voigkt's camp in the British Co
lumbia Copper company has fine dia
mond drills at work. If the boud
Voight's properties is
smelter will be built at a little lake
about seven miles from Princeton.
Greenwood, B. C.—In an auto
dent Suuday, E. G. Warren,
of the British Columbia Copper
puny, suffered six broken ribs aud a
rupture of the lungs. Four others were
slightly injured,
feet down the mountainside. *
One hundred and forty ounces of
the semi-monthly clean
up of the Elk City Mine corporation,
has been sent to the United States
say office. The exact value of the gold
is not certain until the bullion is paid
for, but it will run considerably
$2900.
The natural cave recently discovered
on the Dellie mine, three miles from
Ainsworth, B. C., owned by the Silv
Hoard company, will eliminate not less
than $190,900 of development
will save two
proven the property, according to W.
S. Hawley, general manager for the
company.
lveller, \\ ash.—J. T. Pardee and four
helpers have arrived here from Wash
ington, D. C. Mr. Pardee represents
the government geological survey and
will spend the summer on the south
half of the Colville reservation,
work will be preparatory to the classi
fication of government land as to min
eral and non-mineral bearing sections.
After spending a few weeks here Mr.
Pardee will visit Meteor, Covada, Nes
pelem and all the other points on the
reservation where mineral has been dis
covered.
on
taken up a
acci
manager
com
The auto rolled 100
gold bullion
us
over
er
expense,
years ' time, and has
His
That the high tide in the terrible
death rate iu American coal mines has
reached and passed is the confident be
lief of the officials of the United States
bureau of mines.
Figures just issued by the bureau
show that 2,517 men were killed in the
mines last year
1910.
as against 2,834 for
This shows a reduction in the
number of lives lost of 317 in
year's time.
one
The death rate in 1910
was 3.91 men in every 1,000 employed.
The rate in 1911 was 3.74.
Compared with 1907, the darkest
in the history of American
year
mining,
when 3,197 men lost their lives, 1911
shows a decrease of 680 in the number
of men killed.
It was following the
record of this year that
congress au
thorized the government to begin i
vestigations looking toward a reductiou
in the death rate and this was supple
mented in 1910 by tho creation of the
bureau of mines.
iii
New York.
Bar silver, 61 5-Sc; Mexican dollars,
48c.
< opper—Quiet. Standard, spot and
.Tune, $16.87 l-2(fi)17.37 1-2; electrolytic,
17 [email protected] 3-4; lake,
casting, 17 l-8c.
Tin—Firm.
17 5-8cfe>17 3-4c;
Spot and June, [email protected]
Lead—Steady, $4.40(p)4.50.
Antimony—Quiot. Cookson's, $8.
Almost 100,000 workers toil in pack
ing houses.

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