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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, July 11, 1912, Image 6

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SUmURTOFNEWS
FROM WORLD OVES
SIOIT ITEMS CLIPPED FROM
DAILY PAPER DISPATCHES
DURING PAST WEEK.
Review of Happenings In Both Eastern
and Western Hemispheres During Past
Week—National, Historical, Political
! and Personal Eventa Told in Short
Paragraphs for Everybody.
The existence of bubonic plague in
Havana lias been definitely determined.
The convention of the National Mer
cantile league was held in Los Angeles
July 8 to 12.
The Portuguese government has
dered the battleship Vasco da Gama
Oporto in consequence of disorders
the towns in the northern provinces.
The fourth division of the United
status Atlantic fleet sailed northward
from Cuba Saturday. The supply ship
Celtic, the hospital ship Solace and the
fuel ship Cyclops remain.
Senator-elect Ollie James, after con
sulting with Governor Wilson regard
ing the official notification ceremonies,
said he knew of no bettor place than
Seagirt, and the date would be Wednes
day, August 7.
The White Star liner Olympic, with
more than 250 passengers in her saloons
and cabins, went aground off Ellis isl
and Saturday after veering from her
course to avoid collision with a yacht.
She was soon afloat.
Only 3500 men are estimated as com
prising the remnant of the rebel Mex
ican army at present. Desertion be
cause of lack of food and money and
federal triumphs have greatly reduced
the inBurrecto columns within the last
week.
General Pascual Orozco has ordered
the bulk of the rebel army westward
toward the states of Sonora and Pa
cific coast towns, where it is hoped to
got ammunition from Japanese manu
facturers and thus continue the revolu
tion.
or
to
in
At Paris tho naval investigation com
mittee reported that the accident
(board tho Freuch armored cruiser
Jules Michelet, off Heyers, June 26,
by which four sailors were killed and
19 injured, wns due to combustible
gases remaining iu tho guns after pre
vious firings and to the gun cleaning
being incomplete.
At Washington Mrs. Mary Wehr
kamp and her daughter, Katherine
Wehrkamp, thought to have been re
lated to the Knabe family, piano manu
facturers, were fouud dead from as
jpliyxiatiou at their apartments in a
lashionablo section Qf the city, and
the corouer's verdict placed the respon
sibility for the deaths upon the daugh
ter.
on
IMPEACHMENT OF ARCHBALD
House Judiciary Committee Presents
Charges Against the Jurist.
Washington.—A sharp difference
along political lines has developed iu
the senate over the proposed itnpeach
uneut of Judge Archbald. Many sena
tors, including influential republicans,
favor deferring the trial until after the
November elections, contending that
ample time should be given to prepare
for the hearing of the impeachment
charges and that mauy
needed at home to look after their
litical fences.
Others senators, among whom
Senators Simmons, Bailey and Reed, all
democrats, urge that impeachment pro
ceedings are of such high privilege that
they should bo taken up ns soon as the
bouse prefers tho charges.
senators are
po
are
FIRST WHEAT AT ELTOPIA
Buyers Pay 72 12 Cents Bushel for 25
Bushel Crop.
Kite pi a, Wash.— H. M. Owen, Mon
day, delivered the first load of wheat
to the warehouse from the 1912 crop.
Mr Owen will harvest 2000 acres ave
aging from 20 to
.1 be wheat was delivered to the Kerr
tLfford warehouse, the price offered be
>ng 72 1-2 cents a bushel.
r
25 bushels an acre.
Intense Heat in Chicago.
Chicago.—Temporary relief from the
three days' hot wave came Saturday
siignt, when a lake breeze caused the
mercury to drop from 90 to 75 in a
few hours.
Later the breeze died out
aud the thermometer begau rising
again.
There were 10 deaths from tho heat
and 22 prostrations were reported Sat
urday. Heat-crazed dogs bit 15 persons.
To Stop Flag Desecration.
Washington.—A bill to penalize the
desecration of the flag and coat of
arms of the United States and to
E
N
pre
vent their use for advertising, patent
or copyright was introduced recently
by Representative Cox of Ohio, demo
cratic nominee for governor,
would make the Grand Army of the
Republic the only organization allowed
to use the flag as an emblem.
(
The bill
Boy Drowns North of Newport.
Newport, Wash.—Albert Crown.
age
11, living with his parents in the Calis
pel valley, about five miles north
Cusi'k, was drowned recently in Taco
ma creek. The boy was wading in tho
creek aud stepped into a deep hole.
of
of
WASHINGTON MINE
WORKERS MEET
Will Arrange New Wage and Hour
Agreement With Coal Operations—
John Mitchell There.
Seattle.—With
seating the varie
the I'nited Mine
50 delegates, ropre
ous locals of the state',
e Workers of America
lintli annual state
at .Seattle, this week.
their
con
vent ii
•I'll.
convention is of unusual import
is the wage and hour agreement
with tlic coal operators' association of
the state expires this year and
one will be formulated.
;i nee.
a new
It is expect
ed that the convention will be in ses
sion for three weeks or a month.
John Mitchell, former president of
the United Mine Workers of America,
and one of the foremost labor leaders
of the country,responded to the mayor's
address of welcome in behalf of the
convention.
MAY ASK TAFT TO WITHDRAW
Members of Congress and Office Holdr
ers Fear Defeat.
Washington, July 9.—A nation-wide
movement to petition President Taft
to withdraw as the republican presi
dential candidate is being backed by a
large number of republican office hold
ers, who feel they face defeat in No
vember unless the breach in the party
can be healed.
These men include members of con
gress, members of Btate legislatures
which will elect senators
county office holders, and party can
didates.
If the movement succeeds in gaining
uny volume, it is said, these same men
may ask Colonel Roosevelt to with
draw as a prospective candidate for
aa independent nomination, and to
permit a compromise selection of some
man agreeable to both factions of the
party.
It is the desire of the promoters of
the scheme that a decision be reached
before August 5, when the Roosevelt
faction plans to hold a convention in
Chicago.
state ami
PORTLAND SEES THE OREGON
Noted Battleship Seht There for the
Elks' Celebration.
Portland.—All Oregonians, born
adopted, who could get away, went
down to Portland harbor Saturday and
saw tho old battleship Oregon—made
famous by its inomorable trip around
Cape Horn to Cuban waters during the
Spanish-American war—now for the
first time in its 20 years' existence
drop anchor wholly within the confines
of the state whose nnme it bears.
Also they saw the first battleship
that ever came to Portland and the
first battleship, it is believed, to enter
a port 100 miles from salt water.
The Oregon was sent to Portland in
honor of the national reunion of the
Elks and will remain during the
vention period, which is from July 8
to tho 13.
or
con
a
HEAT KILLS MANY IN THE EAST
Eleven Deaths Monday Reported in
Philadelphia.
Philadelphia. — Eleven deaths
were
reported Monday to the coroner ns be
ing due to excessive heat,
tions were numerous.
Frost ra
The maximum
temperature was 95.
Throe deaths and 25 prostrations due
to heat wero reported in Greater Bos
ton.
The thermometer registered
over
90 degrees.
The day wns the hottest of the year
in southeastern Nebraska.
Five deaths ami nino prostrations
were attributed to heat iu Chicago,
Monday.
New York Swelters.
Hot wenthor has struck New York.
The humidity was excessive and scores
of prostrations were reported.
POSSE KILLS ROBBER.
Man Had Murdered a Bank Cashier in
Iowa.
Mount Pleasant, Iowa.—A lone ban
Saturdav entered tho
at Rome, shot
ashier F. W. Hileman and escaped
with $800, was shot and killed later by
a member of a party that had been
scouring the country in motor cars in
search of tho robber. The bandit was
identified as Charles Clnr, scarcely 20
years old. He was riding a horse and
on seeing tho approach of the automo
biles turned in his saddle and opened
re. In an exchange of shots James
'Loughlin, a leader of the posse, wa 9
slightly wounded and the robber tum
bled from his horse shot through the
heart. Tho stolen money was recov
ered.
dit, who late
Romo Savings bank
O
NEVADA EXPLOSION KILLS.
to
ing
Al H. Cook of Virginia, Former Powder
Man of Consolidated Company, a
Victim.
Reno.—A special to the Journal from
ly, Nev., says: A1 11. Cook, Roanoke,
Ya., for two years a powder man of the
evada Consolidated Copper company,
upper Flat pit, and seven Austrians
ud one Greek were killed instantly
Sunday when a load in a drill hole, with
several hundred pounds of black pow
der and a large quantity of dynamite,
exploded.
The cause of the explosion is un
known.
E
N
(
Wilson Blames Tariff
.
■ engirt, N. J—Governor Wilson has in
expressed ns opinion that the high cost
living is the burning issue of the
hour and that at its heart lies the La.,
high protective tanff." |herc.
of
FAIRBANKS, AUSHA
IN AN EARTHQUAKE
ONE DEATH REPOSTED AND A
GREAT AMOUNT OF PROP
ERTY DAMAGED.
Violent Shocks Last Forty Minutes—
See Good in Volcano—Hot Cinders
Pour Down Side of Grumbling Moun
tain, Fertilizing Earth—Bering Sea
May Change—Geologists Go North.
Fairbanks, Alaska, July 8.—The most
violent earthquake
took place at 10 o 'clock Saturday night,
the earth rocking continuously for
seconds,
throughout the night.
Louis Anderson, foreman of a mine
on Domo creek, was killed as a result
of the earthquake.
ever known here
40
Less violent shocks occurred
Recorded in Kansas.
Heavy earth shocks 70 minutes in
duration were recorded on the seimo
gruph at the university of Kansas, Sun
day morning. The center of the dis
turbance was estimated at 2800 miles
distant.
Volcanic Dust Covers Region.
Seattle.—Fine volcanic dust is still
falling over the region within Beveral
hundred miles of Mount Katmai, Al
aska, which awoke from slumber a
As only a few hundred
month ago.
people live permanently iu the sphere
of influence of Katmai . and sister vol
canoes, Redoubt, Iliamnâ and St. Au
gustine, the financial damage caused by
the shower of ashes was not large and
the loss of life, if any, was arnoug the
Indians of the fishing villages along the
Alaska peninsula.
Hot Cinders Pouring Out.
Following the first day of the erup
tion, when the volcanoes, after
®truggle, blew out the rocks that clog
ged their throats, the discharge has been
only of ashes, with no lava. At first
the red-hot cinders that poured down
the sides of Katmai were supposed to
be lava.
a
Tho so-called ashes may be duplicat
ed by reducing to powder the pumice
stone to be obtained at any drug store.
Fine particles of volcanic dust have
been known to float in the air for
many
weeks and to bo carried half-way around
the world.
Ash Composed of Silica.
This ash is composed principally of
silica, but coutaius also all the chemical
elements required for plant growth, and
consequently acts as a fertilizer of the
soil.
Ou Kodiak, Raspberry and Afog
nak islands, which were entirely cov
ered by the ash, grass is pushing its way
through tho deposit where it is not too
thick, and whoro the cover is deep (in
some places 30 feet) vegotation will ob
tain a foothold from above.
Many Sheep Perish.
At the government experiment
tion on Kodiak island the cattle
saved, but many sheep perished. The
water in the lakes and streams ran clear
in a short time after the fall of ashes
abated, and fish were not exterminated.
In the ocean no injury was done to fish.
The spawning run of the salmon had
not begun at the time of the eruption.
The canneries are operating ns usual,
and the salmon are going up the rivers
just as in former years.
are sustaining the inhabitants
of Kodink island.
sta
were
Government
rations
Felt All Over Alaska.
t ordova, Alaska.—Tho earthquake
shocks of Saturday night and Sunday
were felt all over Alaska.
Mount Katmai is again
It is feared
in eruption.
Wireless connection with Kodiak island
is broken.
The fact that the United Stat
station
os navy
has been unablo to
with Karluk, Bristol bay
and other westward stations siuco the
earthquake is leading to the fear that
further
wireless
communicate
volcanic eruptions may be tak
ing place to tho westward,
from tho Bristol bay station were faint
ly heard about midnight last night, but
those stations were unablo to hoar the
navy-station here.
Katmai is known to be still smoking
and throwing off ashes.
Signals
T. R. SEES POWERFUL PARTY.
Breaking Up of Solid South Is Hope of
Colonel.
Oyster Bay, N. Y.—With the call for
the national convention of
a new pro
gressive party issued Colonel Roosevelt
expresses confidence that the movement
was well on the way toward the forma
tion of a powerful organization,
would ninko no predictions as to the re
sult in November, contenting himself
with the statement that in the fortnight
since the party was launched
made greater headway than he could
have believed possible.
He believed he will be in a position
to make a strong appeal in territory
which has been regarded hitherto
democratic, with the chances of break
ing up the solid south.
He
it has
as
Four Men Killed In Fight.
Lake Charles La.—Four men were
killed and four seriously wounded today
in a pitched battle between union and
non-union timber workers and guards
employed by a lumber mill at Grabow,
La., a mill town, 50 miles north of
|herc.
I NORTHWEST NEWS NOTES
The Elks' special, whieh left Mos
cow for Portland Sunday morning car
ried about 200 people.
The ceremony of laying the
stone of the new high school building
at Moscow, Idaho, took place Saturday.
The executive committee of the Mon
tana Baptists has decided to hold the
state convention for Montana in Butte,
October 1-4.
Captain John Sargent Dolliver, a
famous pilot of San Francisco bay, is
dead at his home in Alameda, Cal. Cap
tain Dolliver game to this coast in
1850.
At Lewistowu, Mont., Mrs. Thomas
Williams, wife of a painter, recently
committed suicide by swallowing a
large dose of strychnine. Despondency
was the cause of the act.
B. F. O 'Neil, charged with embezzle
ment in connection with the failure of
the State Bank of Commerce of Wal
lace, is now in the Wallace jail await
ing trial, unable to get bonds.
One hundred and seventy-five Elks
of the Lewiston lodge departed Sunday
night for Portland. Approximately 800
Elks will represent the eight lodges
of Idaho at Portland in the convention
to be held there this week.
Andrew Lenniger, a cable splicer in
the employ of the Montana Independent
Telephone company, was fatally injured
Saturday when 3800 volts of electricity
passed through his body while he
at work on a telephone pole.
corner
A
Sea
40
in
was
Al
a
At the business meeting of the Mon
tana grand lodge, Benevolent and Pro
tective Order of Elks, J. W. Walker of
Kalispell was elected state grand
alted ruler and Missoula was selected
for the next place of meeting.
by
the
the
ex
Harry Sheppard of Bellingham,
W!ash., was recently elected president
of the National Amateur Press associa
tion, which closed its annual
tiou at La Grande,
conven
, Ore., Saturday.
Bellingham was chosen as the 1913
vention seat.
con
to
At the annual general meeting of
the Grand Forks (B. C.) Fruitgrowers'
association Saturday James Rooko
reelected president, W. T. Ross, vice
president and W. H. Collins, W. F.
Armstrong, E. Herrick and A1 Traun
weiser, directors.
Charles Stiger, aged 27, employed
in the bridge department of the Chi
cago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Rail
road, was drowued recently in the Yel
lowstone river
Stiger slipped from a raft,
from Genesee, 111.
J. L. Stice has been appointed post
office inspector for the northwest dis
trict, with headquarters in
Stice, it will be recalled, was the post
office inspector who bore the brunt of
the government's contest with the
Lewis Publishing company at St. Louis
recently.
The deud bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Bert
Smith were found Sunday in a room oc
cupied by the couple
store at Butte. The throat of Mrs.
Smith had been cut from ear to
After ending the life of his wife it is
supposed Smith swallowed a dose of
carbolic acid.
Friendly Zimmerman, ,a young man
25 years old, residing at Fairfield, and
a member of a camping party in the
mountains in Teton county, Montana,
was shot and instantly killed Sunday
while holding out at arm 's length a tar
get at which young women members of
the party were shooting with a rifle.
Admitting that for 20 years he had
been deceiving the officials of Yuba
county, California, whose duty it is to
count the county funds, but declaring
that his reason therefor was merely to
gain time to make good what he claims
is a clerical error in his books, George
W. Pine, county treasurer and tax col
lector, has confessed to a shortage of
$9600 in his accounts.
a
was
near Orinoco, Mont.
He came
of
Spokane.
over
a grocery
ear.
While giving an exhibition of lasso
ing near Baker, Ore., John Spain,
rep
uted world 's champion roper, and who
won laurels at the Pendleton roundup
lust year, was severely injured,
hurts may result in the loss of his
Spain had just roped
arm.
unbroken
horse and the rope caught his arm.
The horse he was riding stopped, draw
ing it through the muscles to the bone,
severing the veins.
The injury was too serious and ampu
tation at the wrist was performed.
au
DOG SAVES MISTRESS- LITE.
According to This Story 'Tis Truly a
Wonderful Dog.
San Francisco.—Omega, a collie,
contly saved the life of his mistress
by dragging her unconscious body from
a burning bungalow.
Mrs. W. B. West, owner of the dog,
was in her room when the collie
dashing in and began tugging at her
dress. She followed and reaching the
lower hall found the house in flames.
She ran up to her room again to
some jewelry and was overcome by the
heat and flames.
re
came
of
on
I
save
When his mistress did not
reappear,
Omega dashed into the house and
dragged the unconscious woman to the
yard, where she was revived by neigh
bors. Both the woman and the dog
were burned slightly.
$350,000 Blaze at Kansas City.
Kansas City, Mo.—Twenty-five fire
men were overcome Sunday by smoko
and damage amounting to $350,000
done by a fire that destroyed the two
upper floors of the Morris Packing
jpany in Kansas City, Kan,
was
»RICH KILLED 26 I
IN PENNSYLVANIA
a
is
in
a
of
in
EXCURSION TRAIN COLLIOED
WITH DOURLE READER
FREIGHT TRAIN.
The Freight Engines Plowed Through
the Wooden Coach, Crushing It as it
It Were Paper—Besides the Dead
There Were 29 Injured—Officials Un
able to Place the Blame.
Latrobe,
Pa., July 5.—Twenty-six
persons were killed and 30 injured,
many fatally, when a passenger train
the Ligonier Valley railroad
smashed into by a double-header freight
train. Only one passenger escaped with
out serious injury. The accident oc
curred at the fair grounds at Wilpen,
one and a half miles from Ligonier,
summer resort.
on
was
a
A majority of the injured were resi
dents along the Wilpen branch.
The passenger train had started from
Ligonier. It consisted of a locomotive
pushing one coach. The freight train
of many coal cars was
two heavy locomotives. Every seat in
the lone coach was occupied by persons
returning from a Fourth of July holi
day.
being pulled by
a
of
The impact was terrific. The freight
locomotives plowed through the wooden
coach, crushing it as if it were
paper.
All the occupants were hurled to the
roadbed. Some fell in the path of the
onrushing locomotives, while others
were imbedded partly in the cinders
and crushed stones beside the rails.
The first locomotive of the freight
train stopped
soon after tearing
through the passenger train, turned half
way around and fell over on its side.
Engineer McCounaghey was scalded to
death, while his fireman, George Byers,
jumped only to fall on the track and
meet death under the wheels. Engi
Smith P. Beatty of the second
locomotive jumped and sustained a bro
His fireman, John Ankney,
fell beneath a car. His legs were
ered and he died en route to a hospital.
Engineer Dunlap of the
of
F.
of
is
of
neer
ken leg.
sev
passenger
train and his fireman remained at their
posts and escaped with slight injuries.
With a list of dead fixed at 26 and
with 29 injured, the extent of the disas
ter is indefinitely known.
General Superintendent George Sen
fent says:
"We have been working to place the
blame.
There was a mistake in com
municating orders somewhere, but just
where we have not been able to find."
FORTY-TWO KILLED IN WRECK
Fog Confuses the Engineer and Smash
Occurs.
Scranton, Pa—The Lackawanna Rail
road company has begun an official in
vestigation into the disaster near Corn
ing, N. Y., July 4, when two
persons were killed and injured.
Superintendent Bine says the testi
mony corroborated in every detail the
findings the company's officials made in
their investigation at the scene of the
wreck.
score
It was shown, it is stated,
that Flagman Lane went back a half
mile with a flag and lighted
fusee and that Engineer Schroeder
past at least two semaphore signals
that were set against
brought out that the mist
heavy enough to obscure an engineer's
view of the semaphores or the green
fusee, which is supposed to be discern
ible in a fog.
Engineer Schroeder has not yet given
any statement other than that he failed
to see the signals because of a fog.
a green
ran
in
him. It was
was not
PACKING TRUST BUSY AT DENVER
Stockyards Business Now Being Di
vided Up—Expect Court Order.
Denver, Col.—A rumor that the Colo
rado Packing company's plant has
passed into the hands of the Armour
interests, that the control of the West
ern Packing company is to go to Swift
& Co., and that the Denver Union
stockyards are to go to Morris & Co.
of Chicago is current in the stockyards
here.
Officials of the companies in Denver
would not confirm the reports, whieh
came originally from Kansas City, to
gether with a rumor that the Cudahy
Packing company of Omaha had ob
tained possession of the
plant at the Union stockyards, Chi
cago, and would enter the market there.
The reported changes are said to be in
the nature of a reorganization of the
National Packing company in anticipa
tion of a dissolution order in the gov
ernment's suit against the packers in
Chicago.
Hammond
Our New Nickels.
Washington.—The design of the flve
cent piece which has been jingling in
the pockets of the American citizen
for many years does not coincide with
the treasury department's conception
of art, and it will be changed in its
entirety. Secretary MacVeagh has de
cided to replace the Goddess of Liberty
on tho face of the nickel with a buffalo.
The reverse side of the new coin will
contain tho head of an Indian.
Lori mar Trial.
Wellington.—The final stage of the
second trial of William Lorimer on the
charge of misconduct in procuring his
election to the United States
tho
R.
of
day
A
senate
I
SPORTING NEWS ITEMS
A\ olgast got the decision over Bivers
in the 13th round in the recent fight at
Los Angeles.
"Chief'
Meyers of the Giants
swings the largest and heaviest bat in
the major leagues.
Johnson won his recent fight
Flynn in the ninth round. The Pueblo
fireman had no show.
Danny Maher, the American rider,
stands second on the list' of winning
jockeys on the flat in England this
year.
Only the most severe weather
hinder the production of the biggest
corn crop that has ever been harvested
in the Lewièlon section of Idaho.
Mike Donlin is hitting the ball harder
than ever as the season progresses, and
with his mark of .420 has a comfortable
lead over his nearest rival, Zimmer
man, the demon slugger of the Cubs.
"Kid" Scaler, the Spokane light
weight scrapper, has been matched to
meet Joe Bayley, the Canadian cham
pion, in a bout of a limited number
of rounds to be held at Edmonton in
August.
At Kellogg, Idaho, E. J. O'Connell,
the wrestling instructor at the Mult
nomah Athletic club of Portland, toyed
with Ed ATho, the husky Kellogg
wrestler in their recent bout, O'Con
nell winning both falls in six and a
half minutes.
with
it
can
oc
a
in
by
Joe Taylor, the Inland Empire tennis
champion, successfully defended his
title in the challenge round of the In
land Empire open championship tour
ney, which was played on the Spokane
Tennis club grounds Saturday, defeat
ing Phil Brain in three straight sets.
At Salt Lake City Miss Grace Cun
ningham, who was injured at the
Wandemere motordrome the Fourth,
when a motorcycle ridden by Harry
Davis plunged into the grandstand,
died Sunday. Arthur L. Campbell,
who also was injured, is not expected
to live.
The Henley regatta, England's fam
ous water carnival, Saturday reached
the turning point in all big events and
for the first time since 1839 received
the patronage of the king. His majes
ty, accompanied by the
Princess Mary, came from London to
Henley by train.
Paris.—Gabriel Poulain recently
a prize of $200 in aviette competition.
The conditions of the contest wore that
a man should fly one meter at a height
of 10 centimeters by supplying his
own motive energy,
flight of three meters 60 centimeters
(approximately 11 feet 10 inches).
Tommy Burns, former heavyweight
champion of the world, now promoting
business in Calgary, will reenter the
ring next month after three years' ab
sence, with Bill Rickards, a Chicago
boxer. Vancouver enthusiasts
booming Rickards as a "white hope.''
Burns has negotiated a $10,000 guaran
teed purse from Saskatoon promoters
and the battle will be held there
August 8.
Before a crowd of 50,000 persons,
worked almost into a frenzy by the last
few exciting laps, Teddy Tetzlaff Sat
urday added still another road
victory to his list in the 250-mile free
for-all on the Tacoma course. Driving
a 120-horsepower Fiat, he kept the lead
from the 19th lap, his strongest
petition coming from Erwin Bergdoll
110-horsepower Benz, and Devore,
driving a National.
Thomas C. Bundy of Los Angeles and
Maurice E. McLaughlin of San Fran
cisco for the second successive year won
the tennis championship of the Pacific
coast in the men's doubles by defeat
ing Elia Fottrell and William John
ston of San Francisco
round of the annual tournament,
match went the full five games and
was the closest and most brilliantly
played contest ever seen on the Pacific
coast.
6-3.
to
queen and
won
Poulain made a
are
on
race
tom
in a
in the final
The
The score was 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4
1 lie 4-year-old son of John Lingren of
Hall, ,Mont.,
found Sunday, lost
in the hills since the morning of July
4. The child strayed away from a fam
il\ picnic and had been in the moun
tains for three days and three nights.
Three hundred searchers, recruited from
Drummond, ,Hall and Philipsburg, found
the child. The little fellow had eaten
part of his straw hat. Most of his
clothes had been torn off by the under
brush. The child was not in a serious
condition.
was
Stockholm.—American athletes
off well in the lead in the
track events of the Olympic
here Saturday. Thirty thousand
got
opening
games
spec
tators, among them the Swedish royal
family, cheered their respective fav
ites to victory while United States
entries annexed a large share of the
firsts in tho initial heats of the
and 200 meter events.
or
100
Eight Ameri
cans, four Englishmen and two Cana
dians won places in tho finals of the
800-meter race.
Clarence 8. Edmund
son, Seattle Athlotic club, was among
tho firsts in the 800-metor event.
American athletes won two notable
victories at the Olympic games Sunday.
R. C. Craig of the Detroit Y. M. C. A.,
captured tho final of tho 100-meter dash,
while James Thorpe of tho Carlis'lo In
dian school won tho penthnlon, ,a series
of five events.
from Illinois
was entered upon Satur
day in the senate by general debate.
A vote will be taken the last of this
week.

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