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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, November 01, 1918, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1918-11-01/ed-1/seq-8/

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How about your
Storage
Insurance
?
Is your crop of grain and
beans insured against loss
by fire while in storage ?
In
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See us about rates
and coverage until sold.
Mix-Walrath Realty Co.
Flu
44
yy
To prevent Spanish Influenza wear
heavy wool stockings, keep yourself
warm and dry and take one Red
Globe Cold Tablet night and morn
ing.
AFFLECK,
Your Druggist.
SHRUBBERY THAT GROWS.
I 'handle tested shrubbery from one
of the best Western nurseries. Fruit
and ornamental trees, roses, bulbs
and plants.
CLARENCE LaFOREST
P. O. BOX 154. OROFINO, IDAHO.
Thelestfcr Gasoline
POLARINE
ik « i
romts
SmiUgo
AND
Mobiloil
t> « j -
ruRu
ér quick
•cederr
ion
We bundle only one kind of
Gasoline.
Low
Hobds
£r
egg
z
ATHERTON
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. E. VV. HORSWILL
Physician & Surgeon
Office ami Residence
Buescher residence
Orofino.
Idaho
F. ELLIOTT SMITH
A ttorney-at-I^w
Orofino,
Idaho
Wm. J. HANNAH
LAWYKH
Rooms 6-7, I- O. O. F. Bldg.
Idaho
,
Orofinc
HOTEL OHOFIN
Rates $1.50 to $2.50. Free Bus
Sanitary K'tchen. Clean Beds
American Plan. Quick Service
Outside Rooms. Sample Room
OUR MOTTO- "Courtesy lo all Guests"
Orofino. Idaoh.
N. O. HaUresoa. Proprietors.
DR. H. D. BRITAN
DENTIST
Office in the Burns Block.
Orotino, Idaho.
Wanted
Old scrap iron. |10 per ton .
Cent a pound for old rags.
1 also buy rubber, brass and
•copper.
ATHERTON,
Orofino, Idaho.
An ad in this paper will do your
, busin iss good. Try It. If your bus
iness is not worth talking about
$100 Reward, $100
The reuilers of mis paper will bp
pleased to ! -n-n that there Is at least
one dreaded disease that science has
been able to cure in all its stages and
that is catarrh. Catarrh being greatly
influenc'd bv constitutional conditions
requires coiuuitutioi^l treatment. Halt's
Catarrh Medicine is taken internally and
acts thru the Blood on the Mucous Sur
faces of the System thereby destroying
the foundation of the disease, giving the
patient strength by building up the con
stitution and assisting nature in doing its
work. The proprietors have so much
faith In the curative powers of Hall's
Catarrh Medicine that they offer One
Hundred Dollars for any case that It falls
to cure. Send for list of testimonials.
Address F. J. CHENEY ft CO.. Toledo.
Ohio. Sold by all Druggist. 7tc.
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0000\
T
T . Kaiï&as I Knew Him
f or Fourteen Years
By ARTHUR N. DAVÎS, D. D. S.
(Copyright, 191*, by the McClure Newspaper Syndicate.)
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I first saw the crown prince profes
CHAPTER XII.
The Crown Prince—and Others.
slonully la the spring of 11)05, a few 1
months before his marriage. He was
then twenty-three years old. He was
In the uniform of a German army offl
cer but looked more like a corps stu
dent except for the fact that his face
was not marked with a scar from duel
ling, us is usually the case with most
meinbers of the German fraternities. c
He hud a habit of placing his hands t
I on his hips and his coats were always f
1 Hared In at the waist which, with the
! sporty angle at which he wore his cap,
I gave him a swagger which was quite ,
I foreign to the rest of the officers of the .
I urmy. He was of slender figure, which ,
I whs accentuated by ills height. He
j was nearly six feet tall.
I He came into my office, I remember,
I with a copy of idfe in ids pocket. He
! took it out and opened it a ml showed
i me a cartoon of himself which appar
! ently caused him considerable amuse
! ment and which, he said, he Intended
showing his family.
There were two beautiful rings on
his left hand and he wore a wrist
wutch, although at that time wrist
watches were used almost exclusively
by women. He seemed to be bright
and quick, hut by no means brilliant.
Perhaps the quality exhibited by him
that Impressed me most on that first
occasion was his excessive nervousness.
He trembled all over. It was plain to
see he wns dreadfully afraid cf pain,
and he evidently realized that 1 had
not!ceil his condition.
"I suppose the crown prince and the
future ruler of Germany ought to
he brave at all times," he remarked,
"but I just hate to have to go to a
dentist !"
He asked me if I had seen any mem
ber of the court lately, and I told him
that the kaiser's court chamberlain,
Count yon Eulenburg, had been to see
me the previous day.
"I'm not surprised he has to go to
the dentist ; he eats too much !" the
crown prince declared,
pect to have good teeth; he's always
eating. As for myself, I eat very little.
1 want to remain thin. 1 hate fat peo
He can't ex
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pie.'
The crown prince and I did not get
along very well at that time. Apart
from the fact he waa auch a physical
coward that It waa almost Impossible
to work on him 8atlsfactorily, he
seemed to have no Idea of the meaning
ot an appointment.
He would agree to be at my office j
at 9:30 and I would plan my day ac
cordingly. At about ten he was apt
to call me up to Jay he would be ou
hand at eleven, and he would actually
arrive about twelve. This haprened
several times, and I old him that 1
couldn't have my work broken up In
that way.
Although I did not see the crown
prince ugaln professionally until 1915,
the crown princess came to me In
1913, and from tliat time on paid me
more er less regular ▼tslts. She was
a woman of great charm and intelli
gence. and although she was more
Russian than German In her ideas, aud
for some time after her marriage was
rather generally criticized on that ac
count, she soon became extremely
popular and today Is very much ad
mired by the German people.
She was one of the most democratic
and infonnal of my royal patients. 1 j
remember one day when I was work- I
lag on Princess Hatzfeld, we heard a .
loud "Hoo-hoo" from the anteroom, j
The crown princess had heard that ! ,
the Princess Hatzfeld, who was a
I
great chum of hers, was in my office
and had followed her into my place
unannounced.
The Princess Hatzfeld, I may men
tion. was an extremely Intelligent and
beautiful young woman, and because
of her intimacy with the crown prin
cess, I took a keen Interest in the
views she expressed from time to time.
Her mothejr was an American.
When she called on me on one occa
sion after the war hnd started, I re
peated to her the gist of a conversa
tion I had had a few days before with
her father. Excelleuz von Stumm. He
informed me that he hnd been trying
to convince all Germans of influence
that it would be a serious mistake to
annex Belgium.
"From morning to night I have been
trying to teach our people some sense,"
he had declured.
Poland and Alsace-Lorraine in mind,
why should we take more responsibil
ities on our shoulders by retaining
Belgium? The Lord only knows we j
have our hands full as it is. I don't
see and I never have seen how Ger- ;
many can possibly win this war!"

With the history of
;
"Your father seemed to be very pes
si mist ic regarding the outlook." I told
her.
"The sad thing about it," she re
plied. "Is that father Is always right 1
I never knew him to make a mistake
In Judgment."
When the crown prince called to see
me again I was surprised to find a
considerable, change In. his general ap
! pen rnnee. Although, of course, he was
j ten years older, he had aged more
1 »haa I would have expected. There
! were Unes on his face which made him
look older than his thirty-three years.
In the outer world he was generally
1
believed to be one of the leading splr
*>ut among his own people he was not
credited with sufficient ubility or In
duence to be much of a factor. In
deed, within the past year he had been
criticized rather severely In army dr
c i e8 f or his Indifference to the crisis
t n which his country was involved and
f or not taking the war seriously
enough, and from all I was able to
observe of him during the visits he
, paid me after the resumption of our
. relations, these criticisms were well
, fountied. The newspapers, however,
which were naturally inspired, always
brought his name to the front when
ever the army he was accredited to
made any successful showing Just as
they did in the ca3e of the kaiser,
During his various visits to me I
tried t0 dravv h j nl out a utt i e on dtf
ferent aspects of the International sit
uation, but. the ideas he expressed
were not ot much moment.
its of the military party in Germany,
"The allies think we will run short
of man-power," he said on one occa
sion. "but we've got 2,000,000 youths
growing up and we'll soon be able to
put them in the war. There's no dan
ger of our running short of men, but,
really, I wish It were all over. This
war is a lot of damned nonsense, you
knowl
lion growlng-up youths of Germany
were created for the Hohenzollerns to
use as they pleased.
Another remark he made which In
dicated how sadly he misconstrued the
epoch-making significance of the great
war in which the whole world was
Involved was quite characteristic.
"With so many men at the front,"
he said, "the men at home ought to be
having a fine time with the women,
eh, what? Do vou see many good
looking girls in Berlin now?"
He talked as if the two mll
to
A number of the girls attending
the University, returned home Thur
sday, during the quarantine there.
Death of A. W. Shoemaker.
Ashbell Willard Shoemaker, well
kiiov. n and highly respected resi
dent of 1 this vicinity, died at the
Lewiston hospital on October 26.
Mr. Shoemaker was born July 3,
i860, in Charlotte, Michigan, and
was married to May Sage March 30,
I J886. Theycanie to Oroftno in Oct.,
He leaves the wife and one
Son, Willard, now in Seattle, and
four daughters, Mrs. Mary Maxwell,
Colby, Wash.: Mrs. Tlnnie Kessler,
Des Moines, Iowa; Misses Ora and
Dal ice Shoemaker of Orollno. Mr.
Shoemaker had been a member of
the M. W. A. for seventeen years.
The relatives desire to express
their heartfelt thanks for the many
acts of kindness and sympathy ex
tended them by friends and neigh
bors during their trials and be
reavement in the loss of a loving
husband and father.
j l$94.
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Mrs. I. Anderson returned home
'"hursday, from attending (he fun
eral of a ni e in Southern Califor
nia.
She was accompanied by her
niece Mrs. Simon Solomonson and
1 j 'laughter, of Pendioy, Montana.
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Ahsahka, Idaho, Oct. 50, 1918.
During the nion.h of September
he Ahsahka Red Cross Auxiliary
I turned out more work than they
ever did since they were organized.
Twenty serge dresses and one knit
ted sweater.
L. M. BERTRAND.
Secretary.
to
PUBLIC AUCTION,
Archie Bonner will sell at public
j at Hts home five miles east of
Orofino on Ford creek ridge, on
; Saturday, Nov. 9th. beginning at 10
The state board ot health of Ida—
ho wishes to suggest, in the inter
■ st of oublie health, that you re
frain front posting bulletins of re
turns of the election, so as to avoid
ihe congregation of considerable
numbers of people, because of the
danger of infection of Influenza.
We earnestly hope you will ac
cepe this suggestion as it Is intend
ed as a precautionary measure to
conserve the public health.
Very truly yours,
EDWARD T. BIWARD,
Secretary.
of
; t. m., five head of horses, 47 head
of cattle, including 14 milch cows,
three p ig 8 . 50 tons of hay. and the
firm implements. Abe Hill, Auct.
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NUF SED! GO TO THE
GARDNER HOUSE
to eat when in Welppe.
Xn. Hazel Gardner, Prop.
Men's Flannel
Shirts
$1.69
In these times of high prices
we are fortunate to get a flan
nel shirt that we can sell at
this moderate price. Close,
twill weave, double stitched,
comes in brown, gray and
slate, each
$1.69
Men's Heavy
Union Suits
$2.75
Fortunate indeed is the man that can
get one of these heavy weight pro
cess wool union suits at this price.
We were only able to get a few of
what we ordered, so don't delay, but
make your purchase early
at a suit
$2.75
»
Our Grocery
Department is Growing in
popularity every day
There is a Reason
Investigate
for yourself; don't take
things for granted.
MARKET QUOTATIONS
Fresh Ranch Butter
Fresh Eggs - -
Hens, alive •
Spring chickens, alive
Old roosters, alive -
Ducks, alive
Geese, alive
Butter Fat, this station,
Prices subject to market change
without notice.
60c
50c
16c
18c
8c
13c
10c
62c
NOFTSGER'S
Your Store and Ours
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