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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, February 21, 1919, Image 2

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WORLD'S EVENTS
The republic has been restored in
northern Portugal.
Herman government troops have re
Dccupied Erfurt and disarmed the
spartacans.
The constitution of the league of
nations received indorsement of the
I<ondon newspapers.
Our president has accepted the
resignation of William Graves Sharp,
as ambassador to France.
Army discharges in demobilization
in the United States reached a total
Saturday of 1,1T4,545 men.
Middle west railroads will be in
the market for 1,000,000 fir ties from
the Pacific northwest soon.
Rioting broke out in Berlin Satur
day, where more than 40,000 ware
house workers are on a strike.
Klihu Root, former United States
senator and one-tiine secretary of
state, was 74 years old Saturday.
President Wilson left France confi
dent that the peace treaty will be
completed and signed early in June.
The transport Harrisburg, which
sailed from Brest Feb. .5 with 2231
negro troops, arrived in New York
Saturday.
Railroad revenues for the calendar
year 1919 may again fall below the
combined operating expenses guaran
teed by the government.
With the blizzard which swept Ne
braska and Kansas last week abating
Saturday railroad and telegraph and
telephone are again in use.
Konstantine Fehrenbach, centrist,
former president of the German reich
stag, has been elected president of
the German national assembly.
Major Smith, flying an airplane,
had breakfast Saturday at Fort Bliss,
Texas, luncheon at Yuma, Ariz., and
dinner at his home in San Diego.
Twenty-one years ago Feb. 15 the
U. S. S. Maine was Mown up in the
harbor at Havana, Cuba, and the
Spanish-American war was precipi
tated.
Approval of the proposal to estab
lish a government price adjustment
board to stabilize conditions during
the post-war period, is given by the
president.
There will be a sharp seizure of
the fortunes of the wealthy, accord
ing to a prediction made before the
German national assembly by Dr.
Heim, a socialist.
IMPORTANT NEWS OF BOTH HEMI
SPHERES BOILED DOWN TO
LAST ANALYSIS.
ARRANGED FOR QUICK READING
Brief Notes Covering Happenings In
This Country and Abroad That
Are of Legitimate Interest
to All the People.
NOTED PERSONS DIE
I/os Angeles, Cal.—Hector Alcot, a
noted arohelogist.
Paris.—General Moiner, military
governor of Paris.
New York.—Jules M. Gaspard, well
known society portrait artist.
Tokio. —Field Marshal Prince Arito
mo Vamagata, head of the elder states
men.
Monmouth, 111.—George C. Rankin,
69 years old, well known republican
leader.
Ottawa.—Sir Wilfred Laurier, for
mer premier of Canada, stricken with
paralysis.
lzos Angeles. Cal.—Frank Abbott, a
wealthy manufacturer and clubman of
Milwaukee.
NUMBER OF SOLDIERS
FROM EACH STATE
Washington Sent 45,154 to the Col
ors, Idaho Sent 19,016, and
Montana 36,292.
Washington, D. C.- A table show
ing the number of men furnished
to the army by each state during
the war was maàe public this
week at the war department. New
York led with 367,864, and Nevada
stood last with 5105 in the total ot
3,757,624 men obtained by draft,
voluntary enlistment or through
tlie national guard.
The figures are compiled up to
November 11 and the grand total
includes the overseas garrisons in
Porto Rico, Hawaii and Ute Philip
pines and in Alaska, as well as tlie
American expeditionary force and
the army at home.
Other western states furnished
the following numbers of soldiers:
California, 112,511; Washington,
45,154; Montana, 36,293; Colorado,
34.393; Oregon, 30,116; Idaho, 19,
016; Utah, 17,361; Wyoming, 11,
393. The total included also 2102
from Alaska.
IDAHO NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Recent Happenings in This State
Given in Brief Items for
Busy Readers.
W. R. Whitney died recently at
Coeur d'Alene at the age of 87 years.
Influenza is raging on Potlatch
ridge, in the southeastern part of
Uitah county.
After long wrangling and stormy
debate the eight-hour act for women
passed the house, 45 to 21. *
Word from the upper Hatwai sec
tion indicates a bumper crop this
year. Wheat is in the best condition
in years.
liyrou Deffqnbaugh, expert account
ant, has been awarded the contract
for auditing the county books for
l,atah and Lewis counties,
of
fix
in
at
be
Captain ,T. C. Oylear, aged 80, died
recently at Ills home on the Little
Potlatch, where he had resided for
more than 40 years. He was a vet
eran of the civil war.
At the inquest at Wallace Saturday
over the body of Andy Anderson, the
jury found that Anderson came to his
death by injuries caused by being
run over by a freight train near the
Morning compressor.
The house of representatives gave
its approval recently to the Cowles
bill providing that in the schools the
English language and no other shall
be the vehicle of instruction. The
vote was unanimous.
Herman Ringer, a well-known stock
man, a resident of Lewiston district
for 25 years, is in a l.ewiston hospital
in a serious condition with skull frac
ture and other injuries due to being
thrown beneath his horse.
That the University of Idaho han
dled the S. A. T. C. better and more
economically than any school in the
northwest is the statement of W. A.
Hobson, inspector for this work, who
finished checking up the accounts
preparatory to settling with the uni
versity.
The consolidation of 20 properties
on Beaver creek, in the C^ieur d'Al
ene district, comprising the Sun
shine, Sunset, Banner and Dewey
groups, covering at least three strong
veins and others of prospective value,
according to mining men, is reported
from Wallace.
The extension work of the Uni
versity of Idaho school of mines has
been started at A^allace by Frank
Skeels, well known mining engineer.
The plan is to start and maintain
classes of workmen in the larger op
erating mines of the district in prac
tical mining with the idea of in
creasing their efficiency.
A new road with a maximum grade
of five per cent Is being built be
tween Kendrick and Juliaetta in the
extreme southern part of 1/atah coun
ty. The towns are four miles apart
and the road lias always been bad
owing to two steep hills. Cedar Creek
ridge, near Kendrick, is planning for
mation of a good roads district.
The Thorn Creek highway district
election resulted in an overwhelming
majority for the formation of the dis
trict. This is regarded as an impor
tant link in the North and South
Idaho highway which it is planned to
build from Boundary county to Boise.
The proposed road will connect with
the Lewiston highway, already built,
near the state line, southwest of Gen
esee. It will give connection with the
paving at the south end of Main
street in Moscow and with the north
end of the Lewiston highway.
'It is reported that the republican
majority in the house has readied a
caucus agreement to pass the amend
atory primary bill, which recently
passed the senate. Little change will
be made in it from its present form.
With the passage of the bill and
its approval by the governor, a state
wide primary, nomination of congres
sional and state candidates in Idaho
will be a thing of the past. Instead,
a state convention, the delegates' ex
penses io which will be paid by the
party they represent, will he substi
tuted. The bill is one of the most
important pending before the legis
lature.
8
a
a
of
Anti-Saloon Men There.
Westerville, Ohio.—National head
quarters of the Anti-Saloon league
here announce that the league lias
sent a delegation to the peace confer
ence at Paris to ask that the United
States be protected in its prohibition
by such trade agreements as will not
embarrass it when it puts prohibition
into effect."
Rob Big German Cities.
Berlin.—Further spartacau disor
ders and pillaging were reported Sat
urday in Hamburg, Duisberg and
Muelhelm. in the latter city the Im
perial bank is said to have been rob
bed of 75,000 marks t$18,750.00) by
members of tlie workmen's and sol
diers' council.
Sam. the chore man, returned from
the city with a scarf pin that con
tained a ''diamond" of no unusual size.
It was the pride of his heart, and the
envy of his village companions. He
treated all inquiries from them as to
its value and its authenticity with
high scorn. His employer, after a
week of basking in its radiance, asked
Sam about its history,
said, "is it a real diamond?"
said Sam, "if it ain't I've been skun
out of a half-dollar."
"Sam," he
"Wall,"
INTENSIVE CAMPAIGN TO START
NOT LATER THAN APRIL 21
RANGE FROM $50 UP.
SECRETARY GLASS STATEMENT
House Committee Hesitates to Give
He Asked—
Secretary Powers
Promises Maturing in From
1 to 5 Years Favored.
Washington—Short-term notes, ma
turing in from one to five years,
would be offered in the forthcoming
Victory loan campaign, instead of
loflg-term notes, under a tentative
agreement readied this week by the
house ways and means committee to
fix the terms of the loan by legisla
tion rather than to give Secretary
Glass wide discretionary powers to
determine them, as he had asked.
At the same time Secretary Glass
in a statement explained that the in
tensive popular campaign would be
conducted as planned, regardless of
the terms arranged by congress and
that it would start not later than
April 21. The secretary had asked
congress for authority to issue either
bonds or notes as market conditions
at the time might warrant, but mem
bers of the committee concluded that
new loan issue would necessarily
carry with it such a lijgli rate of in
terest that financial markets might
be adversely affected for some time.
Under the tentative agreement of
the committee, reached in executive
session at which Assistant Secretary
Laffingwell of the treasury was pres
ent, Secretary Glass would be given
discretion of issuing any one of sev
eral of four kinds of notes to be pre
scribed by the legislation. The quan
tity of these lion-negotiable securities
would be limited to probably $7,000,
000,000, of which the treasury now
plans to issue only about $6,000,000,000.
a
8
POLISH PEOPLE REJOICE;
WELCOME PEACE MISSION
Boisterous Scenes Greet Arrival in
Warsaw of the Members of
„the Conference.
Warsaw.—When the peace confer
ence mission to Poland arrived here
from Paris it received a boisterous
welcome from the people, who over
ran the station and veritably stormed
the train in their enthusiasm to greet
the delegates. Princes and princesses
struggled with peasants for places of
vantage, some of the enthusiasts even
climbing on the engine tender as the
train halted. •
President Paderewski received the
mission, speaking to the members of
each nationality in their native tongue.
SENATE PASSES RIVERS
AND HARBORS BILLL
It Carries Appropriations of $33,000,
000—Waterway Between Puget
Sound and Grays Harbor.
■Without a rec
Washington, I). C.
ord vote the senate Wednesday pass
ed the annual rivers and harbors bill,
carrying appropriations of $33,000,000,
or $6,000,000 more than the original
house measure. The bill now goes to
conference.
HUNS ASK TO DON
UNITED STATES UNIFORMS
German Officers Are Told That Their
Services Are Not Wanted by
This Country.
Coblenz.-—Between 75 and 100 ap
plications for commissions in tlie
American army have been received
from German officers by the advanced
general headquarters of the American
expeditionary forces here. Those ap
plications come from officers ranging
from lieutenants to majors.
BELGIUM BEREFT FOR YEARS.
Immensity of Disaster Which Has Be
fallen It Is Appalling.
Brussels.—Spend five days in Bel
gium and you will start by being sur
prised at the apparent luxury and
plenty and end by being appalled at
the immensity of the disaster which
lias befallen the little country of
Edith t'avell -of Louvain and Mu
lines.
Be a Friend to everyone.

nors between 18 and 21 to obtain cig
arettes by misrepresentation of age.
Requiring 25 days' notice of final
settlement of estates.
if all liquor
Diverting 50 per cent
violation fines into county funds for
the enforcement of the dry law.
to
a
Appropriating tlie permanent high
way levy of $ 1 , 000 , 001 ) under an emer
gency clause.
Prohibiting district boards from
discriminating in pay of women teach
era.
Requiring the filing of lists of
heirs, legatees and probable value of
estates for the convenience of the
state tax commissioner.
he
NATIONS' LEAGUE IS
ALL PLANNED NOW
IN A FEW WORDS, HERE'S HOW
THE PROGRAM IS TO
OPERATE.
CDL. HOUSE IN WILSON'S AID
Those Outside the Five Big Nations
Can Become Members of League
When They Agree to the
Laws and Are Elected.
Paris.—With the subject of the
league of nations now out of the
way for some time to come, the big
gest problem before the peace con
ference at present is believed to be
readjustment of the world's finan
cial and economic relations.
When the supreme council reas
sembled Colonel E. M. House took
the place of President Wilson.
Briefly What League is.
Administration of the league of
nations shall be in the hands of an
executive council and permanent sec
retary.
Each member nation shall have
one vote in the body of delegates,
which shall meet at the league's
capital at stated intervals.
The executive council shall consist
of representatives of the United
States. Great Britian, France, Italy
and Jgpan, with four representatives
from other states to be elected by
the body of delegates.
The secretariat shall be comprised
of a secretary general and assistants
to be elected by the executive coun
cil.
* Membership.
Non-member nations, upon giving
guarantees of their intention to ob
serve the league's mandates, shall
be admitted to membership in the
league upon an affirmative two-thirds
vote of the member nations.
Preservation of Peace.
Member nations are required to
submit disputes to the executive
council, which may refer problems to
the international court of justice.
An award will be made within six
months and the disputants will be
bound not to resort to war for at
least three months after the award
is made.
If a disputant files an acceptance
of the award of the executive coun
cil, it shall decide measures to en
force the award.
These may take the form of sever
ance of diplomatic relations, econ
omic blockade, or use of armed for
ces under direction of the executive
council.
In case of a dispute between a
member of the league and a non
member, the latter shall be invited
to assume the obligations of mem
bership and submit to the provisions
for averting war, with the alterna
tive of facing the same measures as
the disputant member nation.
Disarmament.
The executive council shall formu
late plans for the reduction of ar
maments to the lowest point con
sistent with national safety.
Tlie private manufacture of war
materials shall be prohibited.
Colonies.
The German colonies in "the Pa
cific and in Africa shall be placed
under the protection of the nations
best suited to their administration.
The slave and liquor traffic shall
be abolished in the African territo
ries affected.
in
of
the
of
to
Turkish Territories.
Certain Turkish territories shall
be given the benefit of protectorates
on the basis of self-determination.
Labor Reforms.
A permanent bureau of labor shall
he established, to secure and main
tain humane conditions of labor In
member nations and countries asso
ciated commercially.
Freedom of the Seas.
The league shall secure and main
tain freedom of transit and equitable
treatment for the commerce of all
member nations.
ap
tlie
ap
Be
Bel
sur
and
at
of
Mu
Secret Treaties.
Obligations by member nations in
consistent with the laws of the
league shall be abrogated. Further
treaties must he filed with' the in
ternational bureau of general treaties
and published.
Amendments.
Amendments of the constitution
shall be effective when ratified by
the states represented on the execu
tive council and three-fourths of the
states represented on the body of
delegates.,
cig
Frisco Strike Looms.
San Francisco.—Prospects of a gen
eral tieup of shipbuilding in the San
Francisco hay region loomed up again
Sunday after a period of attempted
mediation, when the boilermakers'
union of Oakland announced an imme
diate strike of all union members,
and a small group of striking San
Francisco boilermakers failed to com
promise wage differences with their
employers.
for
from
of
of
the
Mention Blessings instead of burdens.
SEE PRELIMINARY PEACE
TREATY IN NEW ARMISTICE
With Wilson Absent, Peace Envoys
■No Disagree
Are Less Activi
ment on Bosic Principes.
Paris.—With the departure of the
president the letting down in the ac
tivities of the conference became ap
Premier Orlando will
re
parent.
turn on Wednesday. Premier Clemen
ceau is taking advantage of the con
structive recess by resting, Premier
l.loyd George is in England and most
of the other plenipotentiaries who are
remaining here are seeking a diver
sion after the strenuous endeavors of
the last two months.
A portion of the supreme war ooun
cil is engaged in perfecting the lan
guage of the new armistice condi
tions to aseertain features yet to be
determined.
It will be impossible to put the
new terms into operation on Mon
day, when the present armistice ex
pires. It has been decided, therefore,
to extend the present terms 72 hours
and have equal extensions later, prob
ably to give Ute German government
an opportunity to consider the new
conditions. This opportunity is due
to the suggestion of President Wilson.
The new armistice will amount to
a preliminary peace treaty. It is
hoped that it will lessen the French
apprehension by the assurance that
Germany will be made impotent
militarily, one condition being the
reduction of the German army and
another control of the German mu
nition production. The American
delegates feel that the French will
have nothing to fear from Germany
in the peace treaty.
a
In
in
I
as
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS LOST
IN BIG. SAVANNAH FIRE
Flames, Fed by Large Quantities of
Turpentine and Rosin, Rage
for Five Hours.
Savannah, Ga.—Fed by large quan
tities of rosin and turpentine fire of
undetermined origin recently destroy
ed the plant of the Southern Fertil
izer and Chemical company and burn
ed a swath three city blocks long and
about 200 feet wide through the ter
minals of the Seaboard Airline rail
road on Hutchinson island, with a loss
estimated in millions of dollars. Cot
ton, naval stores, sugar, lumber and
nitrate of soda added to the .intenstiy
of the flames.
NORTHWEST MINING NEWS.
The Consolidated Mining and Smel
ter Co. received 8.402 tons of ore in
the first seven days of this month, ac
cording to a report from its smelter
at Trail, B. C. This may be compared
with 6,151 tons in the corresponding
period of January.
The Success mine, near Wallace,
Idaho, following the Hercules and
Tamarack mines, closed down Febru
ary 9, owing to the unfavorable con
dition ot the metal market. The prop
erty, which resumed operations last
August following a temporary suspen
sion, is to be abandoned, the pumps
drawn and the workings allowed to
fill with water. It was decided to pull
the pumps rather than to keep them
working, which caused an expense of
$21,000 during the previous shutdown.
Since starting up last August, the
price of lead has declined $36 a ton
and zinc $12 a ton. Mining opera
tions are said to have been profitable
until the price of metals kept steadily
decreasing to the present low level.
New York Metal Market.
Copper unsettled in the absence of
demand. Klectrolytic, [email protected]%. Iron
unchanged. Meial Exchange quota
tions: Lead quiet; spot offered 510,
February 5; spelter quiet; East St.
Louis delivery, spot and February,
[email protected]
Auto Records Broken.
Daytona Beach, Fla.—Every long
distnnee record on Daytona beach
save one went to smash Sunday be
fore theonrush of Ralph DePalma
driving his aviation-motored special
twin-six auto. Record for two miles,
lie traveled in 49.54 seconds.
A fresh three-mile record was es
tablished, 1:15:04, and that was fol
lowed immediately by a four-mile
achievement of 1:39:77; then the Bar
raco record for five miles, 2.34, male
by Henry 13 years ago, went by the
board as the streamlined auto cov
ered tiie course in 2:04:58. The 10
miles was covered .in 4:09:31, more
than a minute faster than the record.
The 20-mile record was made by
DePalma in 9:21:41.
In
Break Up Largest Ranch.
San Jose, Cal.—With the placing of
a deposit by a purchaser this week
on part of the famous "Bloomfield''
ranch of Miller & Lux at Gilroy, Cal.,
began tlie breaking up into small
vegetable and fruit farms' of the lar
gest individual land holdings in the
west, if not in the United States.
by
of
Hindenburg Their Idol.
llindenburg arrived at the
headquarters at Kolberg recently and !
greeted by immense masses !
singing "Deutschland
He lives at a hotel and from the bal
cony he
whole town
honor.
new
über alios."
thanked tlie people,
was bef lagged
The
in his
Germany Won't Demobilize.
ernian foreign secretary, discuss
ing Germany's foreign policy in the
national assembly, declared he had
resisted and would continue to resist
allied attempts to make Germany de
mobilize all her military furccs.
Ci
E
WAY TO THE Ü. S.
SAILED FROM BREST SATURDAY
LAST, THANKS FRANCE FOR
HOSPITALITY.
nMCy TIME ^HEAD S SLATED
M»'*- "in-nu I« vwi.—
Will Arrive at Boston Feb. 24, When
Will Deliver an Address—
Wants Congress to Defer De
bate on League of Nations.
He
Brest.—President Wilson sailed for
the United States aboard the liner
George Washington at 11:15 a.
Saturday.
President Wilson gave out the fol
lowing statement just before em
barking for the United States:
"I cannot leave France without ex
pressing my profound sense of hos
pitality of the French government.
They have received and treated me
I most desired to be treated—as
a friehd—a friend alike in spirit and
In purpose.
"I am happy to think that I am to
return to assist with all my heart
in completing the just settlements
which the conference is seeking, and
I shall carry with me during my ab
sence very happy memories of the
two months I have spent here. I
have been privileged to see near at
hand what my sympathy had already
conceived of the sufferings and prob
lems of France, and every day has
deepened my interest in the solution
of the grave question upon whose
proper solution the future prosperity
of France and of her associates and
of the world depends.
"May I not leave my warm and
affectionate farewell greetings."
Jusserand With Wilson Party.
M. Jusserand, French ambassador
to the United States; Madame Jusse
rand, David R. Francis, former Amer
ican ambassador to Russia, and his
son and daughter were among ths
presidential party.
m.
as
Program at Home.
President Wilsom
Washington,
will find a hard week's work ahead
of him when he returns from France.
Within that time he is expected to:
Appeal to joint session of congress
for indorsement of the league of na
tions.
Confer with governors on unem
ployment.
Confer with party leaders regard
ing organization of the next con
gress.
Appoint successor to Attorney Gen
eral Gregory.
Sign great, mass of appropriation
bills.
Sign revenue bill.
Make great number minor ap
pointments.
Lead parade of returned Yanks
down Pennsylvania avenue.
President Wilson will arrive at
Boston on the transport Georgs
Washington about February 24 whers
he will deliver an address upon bis
arrival.
Asks Congress to Wait.
Our president has cabled a request
to the foreign relations committees
of congress to defer debate on the
constitution of the proposed league
of nations until he had an oppor
tunity to go over it "article by ar
ticle" with the members.
"There is a good and sufficient
reason for the phraseology and sub
stance of each article." he declared.
The president wants to get the de
tails of the new world federation for
peace before congress as quickly
as possible.
First "Over the Top" Arrive.
Oakland, Cal.—Four hundred and
seventy-two men of the 57th artillery,
the regular army regiment that claims
tlie honor of having fired the first
American shot at the Germans, have
arrived here.
More Ships to Bring Boys.
Twenty-five vpssels are being fit
ted out at New York to join the
American cruiser and transport force
engaged in bringing troops back
home.
DEATHS FROM BATTLE
EXCEED DISEASE TOLL
Excellent Health of Men in the
Army Shown in Report by
General March.
Washington, D. C.
Battle death
rates in tlie American army during
the great war
exceeded the death
rates front disease,
according to
statistics prepared by tlie general
staff.
!
!
lit past wars disease killed
many more than lost their lives un
der fire.
The battle death rate for tlie
tire American army in this war
was 20 per thousand per year, in
the expeditionary norces it was 57
per thousand per year. Tlie dls
death rate was 17 per thou
sand per year, in the expeditionary
forces, and ill in the army at home.
The Brit ini
eil
expeditionary forces
is given as lit) per thousand
per
year.
But for the influenza epidemic
among our hoys Iho disease rale
would have been rut In half.

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