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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, March 21, 1919, Image 1

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"1
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CLEARWATER COUNTY
VOLUME VII NUMBER 51
O KOFI NO, CLEARWATER COUNTY, IDAHO
FRIDAY, MARCH 21. 101 •
RAILROAD SURVEYORS
Why the Bean Growers
Are Now In Distress
Modesto, (Cal.) Herald: That the
government of the United States is
morally obligated to relieve the dis
tress of the bean growers of the
country cannot be disputed In the
face of the fact that the govern
ment called upon the farmers as a
patriotic duty to devote every avail
able acre to the production of this
crop, of food value second only to
wheat, to feed the great armies of
the allies and of this country. But
this qioral obligation is not also a
iegal obligation, as In the case *of
■ the 1919 wheat crop; and the sud
den collapse of Germany leaves the
United States bean producers with
the bulk of the record-breaking crop
on their hands, unmarketable even
at cost, since the European nations,
including (^ose we saved from de
feat and 'further disaster, promptly
turned to the cheaper markets^or
their supplies.
The government has no"authorlty
whatever to make good the losses of
the bean grow r ers; nor may the Con
gress afford direct relief, since there |
is no authority in law; and if there
vere such action would necessarily
involve like measures to relieve the
many other producers of war crops
and of minerals urged and stimulat
ed to multiply production _ In the
name of Patriotism, -and of Profit.
But the government has not ev
en protected the bean growers at
home, its bounden duty. To the
contrary, the government has per
mitted the beans of the coolie labor
of the Orient not only to be
brought Into our country, undersell
ing the home product though that
• were sold at cost, but has actually
bought these coolie raised beans, the
while our warehouses were full of
beans and a known record-breaking
crop in the making. These import
ed beans bought by our own gov
ernment were raised at the cost of
cents where ours were raised at a
comparative cost of dollars.
In this connection the Watson
ville Pajronian pertinently says;
"Quite a howl went up over the
report of the Manchurian bean buy
-ing, then it was denied. Then came
an interview • with one of the food
commissioners in the San Francisco
Examiner. If we remember right,
wherein the food commissioner ad
mitted that the Manchurian beans
had been bought, and Justified the
purchase on the grounds that the
Manchurian product was better,
having been hand-picked or sorted.
This article raised such a furor that
another member of the food commis
sion tried to still the growing temp
est by denying that such beans had
been bought by the government.
"All these matters were set forth
before Senator Johnson who, with
his accustomed promptitude, took
up the matter with the food admin
istration, which brought forth a let
ter from one of the higher-ups in
the grain corporation admitting
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51
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Hungering Europe
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turns hopefully to this country for
sustenance.
A heavy responsibility <l»volvi
iilion the stockmen of America.
The end of the war allow.- fort
lessening of the stock raiser's a
tivttles rather does It call for still
more Intensive effort.
i
Onr officers wish to In reg irde-i
as the stockman's staunch iriendi
ami financial advisers.
Call upon us.

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Bank of Orofino
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MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $30.000.
5 Percent. On Savings and Certifiicates of Deposit.
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I O R O F I N O ,
IDAHO
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that it had bought a considerable
lot of Japanese beans
time domestic beans were not avail
able.
during the
"Not available!
During what
months were these beans bought?
"Wfe'll wager that at the time
those Japanese beans were purchas
ed, there were beans aplenty in this
sgnte for all immediate purposes, not
saying anything about the vast crop
of beans in the eastern states.
"Somebody t 'prevaricated' (using
agentle term) In this matter.
"However, Senator Johnson has
the matter in hand, and we hope he
will be able to place the blame for
j
f
the present situation where it
should properly lie.
"We are informed that the new
revenue hill places quite a tax upon
the products of child labor. We
trust the League of Nations, if it is
ever accomplished, will rid us of
competition with the child labor of
the Orient, especially in the matter
of selling our beans to our own
| government.."
the Republican policy or
"protection to American labor" (pro
ducts) been in force, at least there
would have been no Importation of
coolie-raised beans to this country
at a price underselling cost and a
fair margin of profit to the home
producer.
facing the same proposition. Indeed,
•e leave it to the Democratic
party there will be full or compara
tive free trade in everything—and
American farmers and artisans will
have to compete with the cheap
labor of Europe and the cheaper
labor of the Orient not only abroad
but in our home market—the big
gest and best market in the world—
just as our bean growers are being
subjected by our own government
and to which our great rice-develop
ing industry Is so affected that the
producers are memorializing Con
gress through our legislature to re
impose the former Republican tariff
of two cents a pound on the foreign
production.
American wages and American
Had
a
Our rice
producers are
if
standards of living demand protect
ive tariffs. In normal times—mean
ing all times uninfluenced by the i
conditions of the Great War-we |
have never known real and general j
prosperity save under the protective j
taiiff system that is the fundamen-1
tal policy of the Republican party. ;
The occasional Democratic control
of the government, aside from thisl*.
_ , I
Great War period, has ever been
marked by business depression and '
universal distress.
■*
I
j
a
Estray Notice.
One long yearling, deep red heif
marks, short
er, no brands, no ear
horns, rather thin. Owner can have |
same by paying charges.
A. L. STALNAKER.
Ahsahka, Idaho.
3-14-13
RAILROAD SURVEYORS LEAVE
j FOR CAMP ON BEAVER CREEK
J. \Y. Mutch, engineer in charge
'of the Clearwater Timber company's'
railroad surveyors,
went to Greer ■
last week, by train, with his survey
ing crew. They took the stage at ;
Greer for Pierce, fron, which latter !
point they will proceed
quarters on Heeds
Headquarters they will go to Beavei I
to Head
From
Creek
'
Camp on the headwaters of Beaver
Creek,and
until snow
do topographical work j
settles sufficiently to :
I
permit of surveying operations. The I
j snow on upper
Raver Creek is now
f 10111 six to eight feet in depth, and !
supplies have to be taken in
hand sleds from Headquarters.
on
ij>
JI M M V,
BUN AND
o-eT MK
SMITH,
QUIC
ur
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YOVNCr MEN
COMMIT MATRIMONY?
Married in Orofino.
A quiet wedding took place at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Lee-Davis in
Orofino, last Saturday at 5 p. m.,
when Miss Christena South wick and
Mr. C. A. Cuddy, of Southwick, Ida.,
were united in marriage, Rev. F. L.
Moore officiating. The bride Is a
niece of Mrs. Davis, and daughter
of Commissioner L. J. Southwick of
Nez Perce county. The groom is a
prominent farmer of the Potlatch
ridge.
i Farewell to Miss Ida Loseth.
| Mi88 Ida Logeth departed for
j Portlandi Oregon, Wednesday morn
j ing to accept a position with the
EHUon-White Chautauqua Company
; who
are fortunate in securing the
services of an unusually efficient
, * , . , Tf
I typist and stenographer. Her many
friends in Oroftno wisU her 8UCCe88
' fn her new position
, ,, , ,,
The Girl s Club, of Orofino, held
I an extra session at the Anderson
j home Thursday night. Mar. 13th as
a farewell "surprise" to Miss Ida.
The Plotters managed to pain a
| position on the front porch without j
making their presence known, I
thanks to the cooperation of Mina
Kathryn Wittman anil the loud ped- J
nl attachment on a Story and Clark,
' Progressive five hundred and music
program,
j constituted the evenings
, and dainty refreshments were served
by the Misses Martha and Kathryn
' Wittman.
Mix-Walrath Realty Sales.
The Mix-Walrath Realty company
report the following sales; Ray
Swank residence on Main street, to
P. J. Hanson. Mr. Hanson lias rent
ed Ills farm and will move his fam
ily to town.
R. J. Wliitted of Peck has pur
chased the Ed Rranuner place about
two miles up the Clearwater, and
on the south side of the river.
A. O. Gross of the Nez Perce prai
rie has sold the Win. Palmer farm,
about three miles from town, to
I John Grosser, who has moved on to
the place. E. W. Jewell previously
owned tills ranch but Is now farm
ing in the Russell locality.
;
I
John M. Frisbee will sell at pub -1 |
l*c sale on his farm 4 miles south
Public Auction.
«est of Cavendish, next Tuesday.
March 25, at ten a. m.. five head of
i horses, five head of .cat tie. six head
,of hogs, and a large list of farming
implements and household goods. I
I
I
C. F. Haile, of the Orofino laun-1
WYd nesday
dry.
trip to Seattle.
Harry
returned
from a
M rs.
Walrath.
who has
been visiting her mother at Jacques
Spur, returned home Wednesday af
ternoon.
LOCAL AND VICINITY.
Mrs. C. H.
hde was a passenger
1,1 Tuesday for down the river.
Mrs. V. J. Hanson was an arrival
■ on Tuesday's up river train.
; . . , _
! ,rip tü Lewlston Monday
J. \V. Blake went down the line
Theodore
Kohl
made the round
I
A
up
pass
worry
Monday morning.
Geo. Cook was an arrival on Mon
' day's afternoon train.
j
:
I
R. M. Crow, of Ahsahka, was an
I <)r ofiuo visitor Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Frazier re
! turned from Walla Walla Monday
for
and
afternoqn.
J. B. Loomis went down the Hue
Tuesday morning with his instru -1
nients to do a job of surveying.
nary
the
Lee H. Davis, was a down river i
on Monday's morning 1
Allen
been
passenger
'rain, returning in the afternoon.
State Senator F. H. Judd.of Fraser,
was a passenger on Monday's train
for Greer.
Space
run
tin
ross
gulch
Glenn Pittwood, of Eureka Ridge,
came in on Tuesday's afternoon
train.
visitor u P°
inthe! thus
in
1 • oi • «I . ^
Louis Shriver. a Clearwater Coun
* ., . , I
ty over-seas soldier boy, returned to
l»icio.
! the
M. B. Erb was an Orofino
1 1 Tuesday returning to Greer
1 ; afternoon.
I
Orofino Tuesday.
Chas. E. Bradtsh was a passenger
' on the down train Monday, morn -1
j j ing.and returned home Tuesday.
J. M. Bryant, IW. J, Hannah and
A. E. Holmberg took Thursday's
morning train for outside points.
Grandma Crockett departed for
Davenport, Wash., Monday morning asHl
to visit her daughter and son-in-law, purse
Mrs. and Mr. Iver Iverson.
at
\\ . H. Bertiand and Robert L. Aee
Blevins of Ahsahka, were in Orofino if
Monday, and departed for home }, as
luesday morning. ls
.VV. H. Bertrand. S. A. Sutton and
E. E. McGuire, commissioners of the 111
North Fork Highway were transact- came
ing business at the county seat the l ast:
present week. home
„ . , , „ _ , to
. ' oniax • ° er n a ery 'i Carey
eceived a telegram from Spokane,
on Sunday announcing the death j wUh
of his biother. Mr. Lomax left for w ,
olTZZ nS ' nß ilast
REAL
i going
Ralph Merrill, assistant cashier of , reads
the Bank of Orofino, is in Spokane j
taking a post graduate course in
the intricacies of the ïçderal hank
system. Ralph is getting his train
ing in the Old National Bank.
the
M. Fairlj, is an Orofino visitor this ,
week. Dune, is railroading on the pj
Mountain Division of the O. W. R.
1
Duncan Fairly, brother of Dr. J. i
and N., across the Blue Mountains,
where the snow falls three and four
feet over night.
j
I
Walter Boland and hts mother re
turned last week to their home in
J Orofino.
ed
For
the past year they trkin
have resided in Coos Bay. Oregon.
where Walter was employed in the
government machine shops, at that
North
point.
! was
! Sam's
I. D. Cleek, a mining man for- some
merly of Pierce, but now operating
in Montana, was in Orofino the
present week, and departed on Tues
day's morning train. Mr. Cleek still —
has faith In the future mineral S
possibilities of Rich Old Pierce. =
Horace Noble reached Orofino on ■ S
the up train Monday, and returned 5
to Clarkston Wednesday morning. S
Mr. Noble informs us that 'hts 2
daughter, Mrs. J. De Baun is tm- E
proving sufficiently to sit up, which 2
Is welcome news to her many E
friends in Orofino. —
M. F.
Brownfield, representing 3
Mills, of Lewis-' 2
transacting business in 3
the Nezperce Rollr
ton. was
Orottno Tuesday, and returned home 2
Wednesday morning. Ills mill uian- 5
; il factures Gold Standard flour,
I high grade product, which is hand- 3
| €d by j be Orofino Trading company. —
The Orofino Rochdale Co. is selling I
their mill and chicken feed.
Fam Agent Appointment Deferred. Î
At , Ue reque8t of the University 3
I , 3
I or Idaho Agricultural Department. 3
I the requested appropriation from j 3
1 **
Clearwater county for the mainten-1 3
ance of a county farm agent, has j 3
been deferred until the farmers, and j 2
others Interested, have more fully 3
Investigated the suggested expend!- 2
tare for a county agricultural ex-! 2
pert.
Railroad Surveys in
Clearwater County
The
following
article.
under river.
The
following
Moscow, Idaho, date of 'March
article.
under a
J S,
either
would to
natural
should we '
wees
appeared in the Spokesman-Review.
A transcontinental railroad,
up the Orofino or Ford creek,
pass through Orofino,the
gateway, then why
worry ?
with
pass anil
"That a survey started this
for a railroad through
county, touching
and Pierce,
Clearwater
Fraser, Welppe
is really the
prelimi
nary work toward a short cut in
the transcontinental line
planned to connect
Lewiston, via the
Clearwater route, is the opinion of I
Allen F. Space of Welppe, who has i
been investigating the matter.
and
is
Missoula
Lolo
Mr.
Space said :
"1 believe that if this railroad is
run up Ford's creek to Weippe,
tin nee up the Grasshopper and ac
ross dite divide and down
gulch to Pierce, it would be there
Salmon
I
u P° n H'P best grade. The grade
thus far "°u* d rise about 300 feet j
in It miles and then stay on about ,
^ the other 14 miles. Krom i
!»eice it would i un up Rhodes creek
l»icio. s and down the Grog ran de to as
the north fork of the Clearwater I
1
flash lights, who come to your i
asHl ' itance whe11 >' ou drop your
purse ' bul S° od to look at both
inside-and out, and the floor slants |
at just the proper angle so you can
Aee ove ,. u le heads in front of you_!
if you're tall enough. Besides It I
}, as advantages. The audience ^
ls t i lere to see tbe 8 how; and you
seldom find yourself seated directly !
111 front of a feminine trio who ! *
came inside because they missed the j
l ast: cal ', and it wasn't time to go
home anyway. And you're not apt !
to get an exhibition of Hart or 1
Carey gun play and several hundred i
re mlleg of e bruah mixed
wUh a trIangular conver8atlon 0 „ ;
w , Mabel - S - fellah - didn - t „
ilast night, or the things that
REAL MOVIE COMFORT CAN
BE FOUND AT THE REX.
May be the Rex can't boost of
fountain, or pretty girl ushers with
s
of
are
going to happen to the guy that
reads the gas meter,
; to
at
Timber Chiefs in Town.
E. J. Brigham, chief engineer of
the Clearwater Timber Co., reached
Orofino Thursday afternoon.
T. J. Hiimbird of Sand Point,
president of the Clearwater Timber
pj re Association, and a prominent
representative of the lumbering in
dustry of northern Idaho, arrived In
Orofino on Thursday' evening train.
Orville Wahl of Gilbert, a return
ed soldier boy, took the morning
trkin Friday for down the river.
lxniis Shriver left for Bismarck,
North Dakota, to Join the band he
in Uncle
Louie is
was playing with
Sam's service in France.
while
some artist on the baritone,

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A Full Measure
of Service
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1 he Fidelity State Bank was es
tablished to serve the people in
helpful way not merely today, but
tomorrow and every day.
nent institution such as the Fidelity
State Bank renders continuous
vice to its patrons.
a
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2
3
A perma
ser
2
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I
When you become associated with
this bank, you receive a full
lire of service.
nieas
As time goes
on.
you will become better acquainted
and the benefits
from our service
ill grow as opportunities to serve
you increase.
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FIDELITY STATE BANK
MEMBER AMERICAN BANKERS ASSOCIATION.
3
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2
Goo. ft. Waterman. President
Dr. ./. M. Fairly. Vice Presidet
Benj. R. Schmid. Cashier
K. C. Wittman. As't Cash.
Orofino. Idaho
[i7iiiiimimiiiiiHiiiMii<iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiit44iR|jjiiiiaiiiiiiuiu
river. It would then continue
up tiro
north fork to the mouth of Monro.,
river and
up the Monroe to tip,
mouth ,,f Cayuae and °P the Cayuso
to l '°'° pa - ss and from there down to
Lolo hot springs.
, ,
' ,M lnss they have a railroad to Mis
soula.
"Such
much for
From I.olo hot
a railroad would
Lewiston ami
would be on tiie shortest
from the east to Fortland atul
with a railroad having a
water grade from Lolo pass to Port
Moscow would be on the line,
from Missoula to Spokane. The rail-.
road would continue
mean
Moscow.
Lewiston
route
Seattle,
I rive
i tarcks
land
down Snaki,
troni Lewiston, using the
already built
jointly by the O.-W., R. and N. ami
the Northern Pacific.
and operated
"The road, if built, will run thro
the Clearwater national forest and
thro one of the greatest grazing dis
tricts of
Idaho or in the west.
I here are 3,000,000 acres of burned
over lands from the fire of 191<)
j with nothing hut the mountain
, grasses growing on the land. The
i Guy use vallev alone lois iaa aaa
y u,u,lt ,llls iuu.uuo
acres to lie u razed The new rnud
M 1 Ilt ' n * VN roa(1
as I believe it is being planned, will
I be a great boon to northern Idaho '•
1
i
Le " iston , district superintendent of
| t,Us benevolent institution, reached
Orofino Wednesday afternoon „ and
departed Thursday morning. Thesq
I itentlemen appeared before- tha
^ oald of County Commissioners and
execut ed an agreement at a cost to
! tbe count y of $51.00 per quarter
! * or lbe kindly care, education and
j niaintenance of unfortunate child
ren 'under the age of 18, who are
! lnd *& en t. sick, homeless, neglected,
1 deser ted or abused. The society la
i doinR a & reat work, and the com
missioners are to be commended for
; entering into this agreement for the
attention of suffering juveniles.
CHILDREN'S HOME FINDING
AGENT VISITS 0R0FINQ.
Dr. John W. Flesher
of Boise,
superintendent of the Child
stat, '
ren 's
Home Finding and Aid Society
and John Howland of
of Idaho,
Donate Your Spare Clothing.
The Red Cross organizaiton
duest that clothing, shoes,
wearing apparel that can be spared
; to relieve suffering humanity in Eu
rope, be left at their rooms in tha
Burns and Brown building, com
mencing Monday, March 2t. Tho
Red Cross workers will be on hand
at these headquarters during tha
next week to receive donations of
clothing, etc., to be sent across.
M
or any
J. W. Blake returned Thursday
afternoon from Spokane.
Mr. and Mrs. C. D. McEachroa
went to Lewiston Friday morning.
Frank Alteneder, a Clearwater
reached homo
Frank
agricultural harness
county soldier boy,
front Camp Lewis Thursday.
got into his
Friday morning.

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