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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, March 21, 1919, Image 6

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IMPORTANT NEWS OF BOTH HEMI
SPHERES BOILED DOWN TO
LAST ANALYSIS.
ARRANGED FOR QUICK READING
Brief Notes Covering Happenings In
This Country and Abroad That
Are of Legitimate Interest
to All the People.
send
England was arranging t<
100,000 tons of potatoes to Roterdam
for distribution in central Europe.
Belief that at least. Half of New
York's 40 cases of sleeping sickness
are sequels of Spanish influenza is ex
pressed.
The German submarine U-48. while
attempting to escape from Ferrol,
Spain, March 15, was chased by a de
stroyer and sunk.
Dr. Gradnauer, a former socialist
member of the German reichstag and
a former minister, lias been elected
premier of Saxony.
announced
appointments
Monday at the White Souse included:
Miss Effie A. Frisbee, to be register
Recess
of land office at Juneau, Alaska.
The Korean activity in behalf of
tlie independence of that country was
incited by Christians, according to a
Tokio cable to the Nippu Jiji, a Japa
nese daily newspaper at Hoululu.
IDAHO NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Recent Happenings in This State
Given in Brief Items for
Busy Readers.
Joseph Caccamonno, age 83 years,
one of the oldest members of the Ital
ian colony in Priest River, died from
a paralytic stroke recently.
Judge Lycurgus Vineyard, age 73, a
well-known north Idaho pioneer, died
of paralysis recently at Lewiston. His
home w'as iu GrangevUle. He spent
most of his time in the state. After
some years in law practice in South
Idaho, he came north. He was a mem
ber of the Idaho constitutional conven
tion in 1887, and served later as a
member of the legislature.
A popular subscription lias been
raised in Bonner county, former
Adjutant General C. S. Moody's home,
to employ an attorney to defend Mr.
Moody in the criminal action brought
against him. Former Lieutenant Gov
ernor H. H. Taylor lias been retained.
Miss Vesta Nepean, a, young wom
an residing with her parents on Dou
meca plains, in tlie Salmon river
country, was shot recently by Mrs.
Newton Otto, a neighbor. The shoot
ing followed a quarrel in which Miss
Nepean's brother and George Lynch,
Mrs. Otto's brother, are said to have
participated. The bullet entered tlie
leg and unless blood poisoning should
develop serious results are not an
ticipated.
Miss Bernice McCoy,
dean of women at tlie I^ewiston uor
Lewiston.
mal school, will leave April 1 to take
up important work under the direction
of the war camp community service
bureau.
Miss McCoy will travel
throughout the United States aiding in
the solution of community problems of
demobilization and reconstruction, es
l>ecially as regards the organization of
women and girls in industry. She will
be subject to call from any cities or
small communities in the districts as
signed to her.
Governor Signs Tax Levy Measure.
Idaho's ambitious good roads pro
gram for 1919-1920 was given impetus
and started on its way when Governor
Davis Saturday signed tlie bill passed
by tlie legislature authorizing a two
mill levy on the assessed valuation of
the state to raise $1,800,000, which will
be used, together with federal and
county funds, for the building of tlie
state's highways. The governor had
previously signed the bill submitting
to the people for ratification a pro
posed bond issue for $2,000,000 at the
general election in 1920.
It- is estimated that between federal
state and county aid close to $6,000,
000 will be spent in this state within
the next few yetfrs. Added to this
amount is $75,000, which makes avail
able additional federal money for the
construction of ia highway from Star,
in Ada county, to tlie Bay elle lakes
and McCall, in Yalley county.
Governor Davis also signed a bill re
quiring public utilities to file annually
an inventory of physical valuation that
the commission may have this data on
which to adjust nates.
The fish and game bill revising tlie
fish and game laws, was also approved,
together witli a number of other meas
ures of minor importance.
The act authorizing -a tax levy to
raise funds to build and support tu
berculosis hospitals, one in northern
and another in southern Idaho, was
signed. Goremor Davis said tlie meas
ure would be à "blessing to mankind."
New Game Laws.
The new game code contains a re
ciprocating license clause which will
make it possible for Washington
sportsmen to enjoy the benefits of the
lakes and streams of our state for an
annual license fee of $2. Last year the
fee for a nonresident fishing license
in Idaho was $5.
The new law will make it possible
for a resident of Washington to hold a
license to fjsli and hunt small and big
game in Idaho for an annual fee of $10.
Last year the same license for non
residents of Idaho was $25. The new
license fees for nonresidents at the
charged • nonresidents in Washington.
The great reduction in the license
lee to hunt and fish in Idaho was made
possible by the fact that the Washing
ton legislature did not raise any of its
license fees are the same as are
present session of the legislature at
Olympia.
In
FLYING ACROSS ATLANTIC.
Frenchman Is Reported Flying To
ward Brazil.
London.—It is reported among air
men that a flight across the Atlantic
ocean is being attempted bya French
lieutenant named Foutan. He is re
ported to have started from the Af
rican port of Dakar, Senegambia, for
Pernambuco, Brazil, by way of the
Cape Verde islands and the St. Paul
rocks.
the
be
see
466
Four Killed in Auto Accident,
I-os Angeles, Cal.—Homer Fender,
Los Angeles; V. H. Barnikel, R. C.
Weyant and .1. Terrill, all of Ingle
wood, were killed when an automobile
stalled on a crossing and was hit by an
electric train March 15. William Nor
ris of Inglewood was seriously injured.
also
the
she
Tacoma.—Secretary of War Newton
I). Baker and Major General Peyton
C. March, chief of staff, spent several
hours inspecting the demobilization
machinery at Camp Lewis Sunday and
departed for California.
the
ber
of
a

of
lor
and
Slept for Four Weeks.
Texas.—Lieutenant
Fort
Clark Wright of the 345th field artil
lery is awake after a four weeks'
sleep. Physicians who had failed to
arouse him agree that either an at
tack of influenza or too close study
in the army caused the lonk sleep.
He appears to be in fairly good
health.
Worth,
a
a
Mr.
tlie
an
in
Butte Home Dynamited.
Butte,, Mont.—The home of John
Turner was dynamited Tuesday morn
ing while Mr. and Mrs. Turner and
three children were asleep. The house
was damaged considerably, but the
occupants escaped unhurt.
of
lias
CIRCUS IN THE AIR
of
AMERICAN, BRITISH AND FRENCH
FLIERS TO BOOST THE
VICTORY LOAN.
TOUR WILL START APRIL 10
Will Give Aerial Sham Battles and
Acrobatics Over 50 Leading Cities.
Each Squadron Requires 11 Cars.
Will Be Several Trains.
\o
at
Washington.—Three flying circuses
of American, British land French avia
tors in American and captured German
Fokker planes will tour the United
States in connection with the Victory
Liberty loan campaign, giving aerial
sham battles and acrobatics over 50
leading American cities.
The demonstrations will be under
the management of the Victory loan
publicity bureau of which Frank R.
Wilson is director, and the actual
flights will be under tlie supervision
of the military aeronautics branch of
the war department with Captain Leon
Richards in charge.
Fourteen captured German Fokker
planes were landed Saturday at New
port News and will be shipped at once
to Washington. The best types of
American planes developed during the
war will be demonstrated.
Tours to Start April 10.
Tlie tours will start April 10, al
though tlie loan selling campaign does
not open until April 21. Each squadron
will be carried in a special train of
eleven cars. Nine end-door baggage
cars will be required to carry the 17
aeroplanes in each squadron. Kach
train will be preceded by an officer
who will select landing fields and
make arrangements with local Liberty
loan committees.
Six of the best British flyers will
participate. Eight French flyers, one
of whom has a record of 43 victories,
have left France for the United States
to take part.
To Take Pictures of Cities.
Photographers of the signal corps
will accompany each squadron. They
will take war photographs of each of
the American cities visited; the plates
will lie dropped from airplanes by par
achute and hurried reproductions made
for the residents of all cities viewed.
The western squadron schedule in
cludes Ia>8 Angeles, Fresno, San Fran
cisco, Sacramento, Reno, Salt Lake
City, Walla Walla, Portland, Seattle,
Yakima, Spokane, Missoula, Butte,
Sheridan, Wyo., Denver, El Paso and
Phoenix, Ariz.
in
of
es
of
or
as
pro
of
will
tlie
had
pro
the
this
the
re
that
on
tlie
to
tu
was
re
a
1 SAY
COME TO TOE U. S.
the
WILL BE READY TO GO TO SEA
WITHIN THE NEXT FOUR
OR FIVE DAYS.
I
1 near
ters
Awarded
LARGEST PASSENGER SHIPS
the
a
England and France Are
Cargo Vessels in Neutral Ports—
American Men Go to European
Ports to Taise Craft Over.
Paris.—Under the agreement which
the Germans made at Brussels in con
nection with the provisioning of their
country, the United States will re
ceive eight German ships which will
be ready to go to sea within four
days. The vessels are the Zeppelin of
15,200 tons, the Prinz Friedrich Wil
helm of 17,000 tons, the Graf Wälder of
see of 13,000 tons, the Patricia of 14,
466 tons, tlie Cap Finisterre of 14,500
tons, tlie Pretoria of 13.200 tons, the
Cleveland of 16,900 tons and the
Kaiserin Augusta Victoria of 25,000 to
this
las
I lie
tons.
The giant Imperator of 52,000 tons
also will go to the United States. At
the present time the Imperator is
stuck in the mud, but it is believed
she can be floated in a few days. 1
the
hold
000
The total ships made available to
the allies under the agreement num
ber more than 700, approximating
1,500,000 tons.
this
Are Passenger Ships.
The vessels going to the United
States are passenger ships on account 1 .
„ .. , „„„ , Ilf,,,, ing
of the American desire to use them .
, . „ . _. ing
lor tlie transport of troops. Those
going to France and England Imme- , r i
diately are cargo vessels in neutral ties
ports in South and Central America in
and the Dutch East Indies.
They will lie permitted to leave and
with cargoes for Germany witli Ger- The
in
man crews, but under allied flags.
When ships put out from German
ports to be handed over they will be 1
manned by Germans, but on arrival 1
in allied ports the crews will be re
placed by allied crews and the Ger
mans returned.
j
ed
England Has Food to Ship.
There is available for immediate
movement to Germany approximately
30,000 tens of pork products, 5000 tons
of beans, 500 tons of rice and 15,000
tons of cereals. The United States
lias in Rotterdam and on the way
Giere approximately 75,000 tons of
breadstuffs.
-
A summary of tile agreement, shows ;
that payment by Germany will be ;
made' by freigli't hire accruing to the
Germans for the use of the shipping, j
and part from credits that Germany
may continue to establish and main
tain in neutral countries; part from!
German exports; part from the sale;
of German-owned foreign securities i
and part by the use of German
,o
posit of gold In the National Bank of j
Belgium at Brussels for use as col
lateral.
Ready to Take Over Ships.
Nek York.—Several hundred Ameri
can officers and seamen attached to
the cruiser and transport forces al
ready have been sent to French ports
\o take over the German ships as
they are delivered. They are to be
supplemented with men from naval
forces stationed abroad. Tlie first of
tlie German ships is expected to ar
rive here shortly after April 1.
Germans Accept Conditions.
Brussels.—The German delegates to
the conference here regarding the
taking over by the allies of the Ger
man mercantile fleet and the pro
visioning of Germany have definitely
accepted the conditions imposed by
the allies.
A board of control for German ex
ports will be established under tlie
terms of the agreement. This board
probably will have its headquarters
at Rotterdam.
The Germans will be permitted to
buy fish from Norway and resume
their own fishing in the North sea.
The German representatives asked
for a modification of the blockade,
and while no promises were given
them in this connection, steps in that
direction, as a matter of fact, have
already been taken.
A monthly mtion for Germany of
270,000 tons of foodstuffs was fixed.
the
of
Montana Pioneers Elect.
Billings, Mont.—At the annual meet
ing here March 15 of the Society of
Pioneers of Eastern Montana, Harry
Drum was elected president, succeed
ing G. W. Mites of Miles City, while
Henry Frith of Billings was re-elected .
secretary treasurer. Each county is to i Ce
name its vice president. There was a
large attendance and the business
meeting was followed by a banquet.
Storm Killed Several.
Kansas City, Mo.—Several persons
are reported killed, scores injured and
a vast amount of proiierty damaged by
tornadoes and cloudbursts which
struck towns in Kansas, Missouri and
Oklahoma Saturday.
by
fic
The prohibition amendment prom
ises to do for America what St. Pat
rick did for Ireland.
1 SAY FAMINE STALKS
IN THE CAUCASUS
Women and Children by the Thou
sands Are Perishing, the
Report Says.
■Thousands of men.
York.
and children are starving to
New
women
death in the Caucasus, according to
the tirst report from Ur.
Karton, chairman of the commission,
sent to that region by the
!
.fames L.
recently
I AmeHcan committee for relief in the
1 near east, received at the headquar
ters of t lie committee here.
"There is no bread anywhere," said |
"Tlie government lias not
There are 45,000 people iu
l-jnvan wholly without bread, and the
orphanages and troops all through
Krivan are in terrible condition.
"There is not a dog, cat, horse,
camel or any living thing in all the
igdir region. We saw refugee women
stripping the flesh from a dead horse
with their bare hands."
the report.
a pound.
REPORTED NICK IS ALIVE
-
Daughter of Hungarian General Says
That Former Czar Is Not Dead.
Home, Friday.—According to an in
terview with Stefania Tnrr. a daughter
of a noted Hungarian general, printed
to death by the bolsheviki.
this week in the Giornale D'Italia,.the
belief still exists that Emperor Nicho
las and his wife, as well as some of
I lie Russian grand dukes, were not put
GRAIN AND MILLING NEWS.
Nampa, Idaho, is contemplating the
buildjng of a 100-barrel flour mill in
1 Nampa, Idaho, at a cost of approxi
mately $100,000, and to mill wheat
grown in this section by members of
the organization. Recently the Equity
hold a meeting, and it is reported $45,
000 was subscribed for the mill at
The Farmers' Society of Equitgr of
is
is
in
of
It is said $30,000 was
this meeting,
previously subscribed.
1 . , . ... ....
ing through in fine condition, aecord
. . . , ' , T .
ing to reports received by Charles D.
Greenfleldi state commissioner of ag
, r i cu ]t ure and publicity, from 19 coun
ties covering all parts of the state,
in some sections there is reported a
and in several a shortage of seed oats,
The Prospects are for a large acreage
in spring wheat.
Winter wheat in Montana is com
shortage of wheat for spring sowing
1
1
Press Casualties Heavy.
San Francisco.—Approximately one
j third of the correspondents and pho
tographers representing the press of
many nations at the front were kill
ed or wounded during the entire pe
riod of the war.
STORMS KILL 28;
-
;
;
j PROPERTY DAMAGE WILL REACH
i
$2,000.000 IN SOUTH—OEBRIS
BEING SEARCHED.
r":jREGULAR TORNADO AT TIMES
j — 1 -
Three People, Crossing Iowa Creek,
Swept Away to Death—Destruc
tion Covered Large Area of
Five States of South.
New Orleans.—Twenty-eight dead,
several. score injured and property
damage estimated at $2,000,000 was
the result of tornadoes which swept
portions of Mississippi and this state
Sunday, reports from the two states
received here Tuesday showed.
Two Whites Killed.
Jackson, Miss.—A storm swept the
plantations near Belzonia Tuesday
night, killing two white persons and
neveral negroes.
Nine Botiies Are Found.
Vicksburg» Miss.—Searchers Mon
day continued examination of wreck
age in the path of tlie tornado which
swept eight miles from a point near
Grace,
northeast to Pantherburn. The bodies
of one white man and eight negroes
were found.
miles north of Vicksburg,
Three Drowned.
Dubuque, Iowa.—Three people were
drowned near Waukon, in Allamakee
county, when they were carried away
white crossing a creek swollen by
the heavy rain. The victims are Mrs.
Ben Bulman, age 27, her daughter,
age 3, and lier father, Mr. Meyers,
aged 54. They were driving a team
across the stream.
Kansas Flood Waters Recede.
Äity, Mo.
. , . „
to i Ce e uesday.
a Oconto River Overflows Banks,
Kansas
river's and creeks throughout central,
northeastern and southern Kansas,
caused by unprecedented rains, re
Flood waters in
Oconto, Wis.—Hundreds of homes,
factories, mines and lumber yards are
flooded and thousands of dollars'
worth of property lias been destroyed
by tlie Oconto river overflowing its
banks.
It was estimated that 600
persons were homeless.
Stops Michigan Railway Traffic.
Detroit, Mich.—Abnormal rainfalls
caused a suspension' of railway traf
fic in parts of Michigan.
Heller Bros., Castlewood general
merchants, reported quit business.
! BLOODY STRIFE SPREADS EVEN
TO THE FASHIONABLE
DISTRICTS.
|
WINDOWS
MACHINE GUNS IN
Commander's Rooms A re Placarded
With Heavily Marked Maps.
Reds Have Asked
for Parley.
person could
e that such a
m existed be
Berlin. -1-ast week a
not get over the surpris
sharp line of demarcatb
that part of Berlin where the
tween
revolution was raging and the business
and residential part wh<
was quiet and tranquil,
the latter place went
about their own affairs
Tiergarten tlie fashionasle folk drove
about in smart traps in the avenues
and the children played under the
In my ride tod^iy out to the
on Luettwitz,
■re everything
The people in
unconcernedly
while in the
trees.
house where General \
commander of the government troops,
has his headquarters, a great change
was evident.
Machine Guns in Position.
The general's headquarters are in a
beautiful mansion in Lietzenburger
Strasse, near Uhland Strasse,
abount half a mile southwest of the
Tiergarten and is tlie Sheridan road
district of Berlin. Government sol
diers with bands on their arms were
numerous in the Tiergarten and in
tlie fashionable streets machine guns
were in position. Berlin no longer
is two worlds, one like Evanston and
tlie other like Ypres in war time. All
Berlin bears evidence that a civil war
is .raging.
Two or three days ago a person
could drive in tlie Tiergarten and the
fashionable residence section and for
get all about the revolution. But even
in these sections this morning groups
of soldiers would stop automobiles and
examine tlie passports before permit
ting the passengers to proceed.
it is
Block Filled With Soldiers.
Tlie block in Lietzenburger Strasse,
where General von Luetwittz lias his
headquarters, is filled with soldiers.
Machine guns stuck their noses cau
tiously out of windows commanding all
tlie approaches to the house.
Maps of Berlin hung on all the walls
and were heavily marked with many
colored lines, showing :he position of
the government troops and tlie revolu
tionists. The officers were shouting
hoarsely through half a dozen phones,
while aides, couriers and runners were
continually dashing in and out of the
door, giving a stiff military salute and
making reports.
General von Luetwittz was smiling
and calm. He said tlie government
troops were making satisfactory prog
ress and were in complete control of
three-fourths of Berlin. The Alexander
I'latz district was cleaned up, he said;
also the southeast corner of Berlin, a
district called Neukolin,
Later Report on Tuesday.
Berlin.—Fifty-five
have
been killed and 170 wounded in the
riots at Halle.
persons
Two hundred and
eighty persons have been arrested for
pillaging. The value of the stolen
property is estimated at 18,000,000
marks.
As a result of the plundering in the
sections of the country outside of
Halle a state of siege lias been
claimed in Ditterlel, Delitzsch, Muen
clieln, Merzburg and Koennern.
Rioting on the part of the peasants
in Windschlag, ( near Offenbtirg, Ba
varia, forced the visiting food
•mission to seek the protection of the
military authorities.
pro
corn
The rural pro
ducers refused to make declarations
of their food stores, and drove off the
officials with pitchforks and clubs.
Detective Guilty of Murder.
Gering, Neb—Clif fold L. Landry,
wfs on Saturday
mgliter in the
Kelly, a young
Sheriff Sherman of
a Denver detective,
found guilty of mansl
killing of Miss Sylvia
school teacher.
Goshen
tried as an
county, Wyoming, will be
accessory in tlie killing.
when her com
Miss Kelly was shot
panion in an automob le disregarded
an order of the officers to halt. Tlie
officers were patrolling the Nebraska
Wyoming border for b
ootleggers.
Portland Cashier Indicted.
Portland,
Dre. — Twjo indictments
were returned Mardi li} by the federal
grand jury against Jej-ome S. Mann,
former cashier of the First National
Bank of Linnton, a Portland suburb, on
charges respectively, of misappropria
tion of the bank's fund$ and making a
false report to the controller
currency as to the bank's condition
Mann's indictment
of the
grows out of the
case of J. A. Pattison, head of the l 1
tison I aim ber
'at
company,
Miss Reed's Death Mysterious.
San Francisco.—Investigation into
the death of Miss Inez Elizabeth Reed
a young army nurse, whose body
found in
was
a ravine 20 miles south of
iere in San Mateo county, centered
Monday on Mrs. Maude Frankenfleld
Retd' 1 * al,d ' Cal " a frlend of Miss
VLADIVOSTOK ROBBERS BUSY
Blow Open Safe In Broad Daylight and
Take Big Sum.
Washington.—A wave of highway
robberies and safeblowing in Vladivo
stok during the last week was reported
SRcently to the state department. In
one instance a band of armed robbers
in broad daylight blew up a safe and
took 200,000 rubles and other securi
ties. In another securities valued at
nearly 2,500,000 rubles were taken
from the offices of the leading co-op
erative organization at Vladivostok.
NORTHWEST MINING NEWS.
The Echo Solver-Lead Mining Co.,
operating at Silverton, B. C., has en
tered the list of continuous producers
in the northern field, according to
P. J. Bonner, superintendent. "The
The total production of Vancouver
Island coal mines in January was
158,327 long tons, which is 18,040
more than for December and 65,632
(ons more than for November.
Mine owners announced March 8
that wages of miners in the Coeur
d'Alenes would be reduced one dol
lar a day, to take effect March 16.
This cuts the war bonus from $1.775
a day to 75 cents a day, and miners
hereafter will be paid $4.25.
"The United Copper Mining Co. will
require 1000 horsepower when opera
tions are placed on the new basis,
which will be soon, and I have assur
ance that this volume will be pro
vided and that there fill be no short
age," said Conrad Wolfle, president.
Notwithstanding less favorable con
ditions, the Consolidated smelter at
i'rail, B. C., received 65,733 tons of ort
in January and February 1919, as com
pared with 61,393 tons In the same
period of 1918. The directors recently
declared the usual quarterly dividend,
at the rate of 10 per cent per annum,
amounting to $261,936, payable April
1. This will make a total of $5,257,
531 declared altogether by the com
pany—or something less than at the
rate of 4 per cent per annum on the
capital stock of $16,000,000 for the
13 years of the life of the company.
No Clue to Butte Slayers.
Butte.—Several hours of searching
lias failed to reveal to the Butte po
lice any clue which would lead to
the identity of the persons who late
Sunday night shot to death David W.
Thomas, a mine guard, returning from
work at tlie Tramway mine.
Our Sailors Reported Drowned.
London.—Nine sailors are reported
drowned in the sinking of the Ameri
can naval transport Yeelliaven, which
struck a mine. •
of
of
a
EARLY PEACE PLANS
*
WILSON DETERMINED TO SEE
THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS
THROUGH SENATE.
ACCORDING TO PARIS REPORT
Precious Time Wasted and Armistice
May Be Prolonged—Demands by
Americans Cause Nations to
Try to Inject Clauses.
Paris.—Something has happened at
the peace conference since President
Wilson returnee^ The "speeding up"
program for obtaining Immediate
of
peace with Germany through the pre
liminary peace pact has been side
tracked.
After lying dormant for a month
during tlie president's absence the
old league of nations covenant is be
ing brushed up and is showing signs
of life.
The interest has suddenly
switched from peace making to the
league of nations revamping.
Shrewd observers figure that Mr.
Wilson has decided that the best way
to get the league of nations through
tlie senate and insure its acceptance
is by incorporating the covenant in
the peace instrument and treating the
whole affair as a single document
which the senate must accept or re
ject as a whole, thus throwing the
onus lor the continuation of warfare
of
upon the senate if the peace treaty is
turned down. Thus it seems that the
whole speeding up campaign for an
early peace next month is shattered,
as with the covenant not even accept
ed yet by the allied and associated
powers, and with the neutrals yet to
bo heard from, there is Bmall chance
that it can be made palatable for ev
ery one and revised coincidentally
with tlie date tentatively set for the
completion of the jireliminary peace
terms—March 20.
a
Efforts Rushed.
Efforts iare being directed to shap
ing the league of nations covenant so
as to insure its acceptance by the
supreme council and with the ap
proval of those Americans who are
demanding its nmendment.
Showing Progress.
Paris.—A diplomatic mountain was
reduced to the proportion of a mole
bill Tuesday when it became appar
ent there was nothing really substan
tial in tlie objections rutsed to Presi
dent Wilson's propoHu! that tlie league
of nut ions covenant should bo in
cluded ill the preliminary peace treaty
with Germany which the allied pleni
potentiaries are now perfecting.
of

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