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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, April 18, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1919-04-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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AGAIN WE HAVE A
STATE MAY WITHDRAW, PROVID
ED IT KEEPS OBLIGATIONS,
ON 2 YEARS' NOTICE.
OUR MONROE DOCTRINE SAFE
Sections Relating to Disarmament and
Mandatories Altered—Each State
Has One Vote—Official Sum
mary of Document.
Paris.—The following offical sum
mary of the covenant of the league of
nations was issued Saturday by the
peace conference:
One—The league of nations is
founded in order to promote inter
national cooperation and to secure
peace. The league will include:
(al The belligerent states named
in a document annexed to the coven
ant.
(b) All the neutral states so named.
In the future all self-govern
ing country whose admission is ap
proved by two-thirds of the states al
ready members of the league.
A state may withdraw from the
league, providing it has kept its obli
gations to date, on giving two years'
notice.
(i »
Two—The league will act through
an assembly comprising not more
than three representatives of each of
the member states, each state, hav
ing only one vote, and a council com
prising for the present one represen
tative of each of the five great powers
and each of four other powers as
selected from time to time by the
assembly.
The number of powers of each
class represented on the council may
be increased by the unanimous con
sent of the council and a majority of j
the assembly. Other powers have the
light to sit as members of the conn -1
oil during the decision of matters in
which they are especially interested.
In the council, as in the assembly,
each state will have only one vote,
llotli these bodies are to meet at
stated intervals (the council at least
once a year) and at other times if
required; both can deal with any mat
ter that is of international interest or
that threatens the peace of the world;
the decision of both must be unani
mous except in certain specified cases,
matters of procedure, for instance, be
ing decided by a majority vote.
The league will have a permanent
secretariat, under a secretary general.
The secretariat and all other bodies
under the league may include women,
equally with men. A permanent court
of international justice and various
permanent commissions and bureaus
are also to be established.
Three—The member states agree:
(a) To reduce their armanents,
plans for such reduction being sug
gested by the council, but only adopt
ed with the consent of the states
themselves, and thereafter not to in
crease them without the concurrence
of the council.
<b) To exchange full information
of their existing armies and their
naval and military programs.
(c) To respect each other's ter
ritory and personal Indépendance, and
to guarantee them against foreign
aggressions.
(d) To submit all international dis
putes either to arbitration or to in
quiry by the council, which latter,
however, may not pronounce an opin
ion on any dispute whose subject mat
ter falls solely within a state's domes
tic jurisdiction; in no case to go to
war til three months alter an award,
or an unanimous recommendation lias
been made, and even then not to go
to war with a state which accepts the
award or recommendation.
(e) To regard a state which lias
broken the covenant as having com
mitted an act of war against the
league, to break off all economic and
other relations with it. and to allow
free passage through their territories
to tiie troops of those states which
are contributing armed force on lie
half of tlie league.
reciAnmend what amount of force, if |
any, should be supplied by the several
governments concerned, but tlie ap
proval of the latter is necessary.
(States not members of the league
will be invited to accept tlie obliga
tions of the league for the purpose of
particular disputes, and if they fail
to comply may lie forced).
(f) Not to consider any treaty,
binding till it lias been communicated
to the league, which will then pro
ceed to publish it, to admit the right
of the assembly to advise tin- recon
sideration of treaties and internation
al conditions which do not accord
with present needs, and to lie bound
by no obligations inconsistent with
the covenant.
*A state which breaks its agree
ments may be expelled from the
league by the council.
Four—The covenant does not af- j
left the validity of international en
gagements, such as treaties of arbi
or regional understandings I
The council is to
i
tratiou
like the Monroe doctrine, for securing
the maintenance of peace.
Five—The former German colonies
and the territories of tlie Ottoman
empire are to be administered in the
by states j
Interests of civilization
which are willing to be mandatories
of I he league, which will exercise »
general supervision.
Six—The member states accept cer
tain resimnsibilities with regard to
labor conditions, the treatment of na
tives, the white 3lave traffic, the opi
um traffic, the arms traffic with unci
vilized and semi-civilized countries,
transit and trade conditions, public
health and Red Cross societies.
Seven-—The league is recognized
as the central body interested in co
ordinating and assisting international
activities generallq.
Right—Amendments to the coven
ant require the approval of all the
states on the council and a simple
majority of those in the assembly.
States which signify their dissent
from amendments thus approved are
not bound by them, but, in this case,
cease to be members of the league."
her
GET PRELIMINARY PEACE
TREATY IN TWO WEEKS
Indications Are That It Will Be Ready
Then for the Huns—Make
the Enemy Pay.
Paris.—The peace treaty and the
league of nations undoubtedly have
reached the final stage of negotia
tions, but it is not clear that they
are out of troubled waters, as they
must pass the ordeal of a plenary
session of the peace conference and
then go before the Versailles con
gress, where enemy powers will be
represented. Indications are that a
combination of both documents will
be written into a preliminary peace
traty within the coming two weeks.
The Germans then will be called in
and the present peace "conference"
will be merged into the peace "con
gress."
The council of four is understood
Iq have fixed for the peace congress
tentative dates between April 26 and
May 5, but no announcement has been
made as to details, so Premier Lloyd
George may have something to dis
close when he addresses the British
parliament next Wednesday.
The summoning of the ship George
Washington by President Wilson led
to belief that his departure was im
minent, but intimate friends say the
ses
He
of
j , )rogress which lias been realized will
permit Mr. Wilson to remain and par
-1 ticipate in the congress at Versailles
when German plenipotentiaries take
p art
j t j s not intended to permit a long |
discussion by the enemy, but to con ' n
t -j ne the exchange of ideas to a brief
p er i 0 ,i, probably 10 days or two
if weeks, and then reach a final conclu
a ion.
a
Germans Summoned.
Paris.—A statement by President
Wilson in behalf of the council of four
says that the questions of peace are
so near complete solution that they
will be quickly and finally drafted.
This announcement was contained in
an official bulletin, which added that
the German plenipotentiaries had been
invited to meet at Versailles on April
25.
VICTORY LIBERTY LOAN TRAIN.
Exhibition of War Trophies to Travel
Northwestern States.
Tlie Victory Liberty Loan trophy
train, touring Idaho and Washington in
the interests of the great loan drive,
will consist) of three flat cars and a
blind baggage, making four exhibition
to
if | Ace, Lieutenant Coles, who w as shot
of
af- j October was convicted of violating
the espionage act and sent to tlie
Leavenworth penitentiary, was signed
I here Saturday.
cars.
The train will make stops at the
principal towns along the transconti
nental railroad lines and will display
some of tlie most interesting trophies
of the European war. The special train
is being sent out under the direction
of the Idaho and Washington state
committees and the tentative itinerary
indicates that every section of the two
states, served by railroads, w ill be vis
ited.
In tlie baggage car will be shown the
smaller war trophies and on the flat
cars w ill tie exhibited the larger pieces
including whippet tanks and German
airplanes and trophies that have been
taken by tlie 91st division.
Under present plans the train will
enter tlie state of Washington about
April 24, working westward to the
Sound and then up and down tell coast
and hack to Spokane over the Great
Northern. Idaho will be covered first,
the train crossing the Panhandle be
fore entering Washington.
An airplane will accompany tlie ex
to bibit with two aviutors, an American
down on the battlefront and seriously
wounded, and Lieutenant Archibald,
who was likewise shot down and land
ed within tlie German lines, where he
was held a prisoner for some time. It
is planned that this plane, which is an
army plane, a Curtis, will give flights
at each town where the trophy train
-tops.
The train will carry a personnel of
approximately thirty men. all of whom
have been in the service of Uncle Sam
and arc veterans of the Great World
War. In the party will be several
speakers who will lecture and explain
tlie various exhibits.
Haywood Furnishes Bond.
Chicago.- Bond to the amount of
$15,000 for the release of William I).
llaywood, I. W. W. leader, who last
i
French Brides Arrive.
New York.—Forty-seven brides of
American soldiers and sailors landed
Tuesday from the transport Blatts
j burg, which arrived from Brest.
t
IMPORTANT NEWS OF BOTH HEMI-j
'
SPHERES BOILED DOWN TO
LAST ANALYSIS.
ARRANGED FOR QUICK READIN6
"England must grant India home 1
rule or India will free herself from !
her oppressors," said Dr. N. S. Hard
Brief Notes Covering Happenings in
This Country and Abroad That
Are of Legitimate Interest
to All the People.
France will soon open its gates to
American manufacturers.
After nearly four months on the
Rhine, the entire 42nd division is
back in France again.
Admiral William B. Caperton, in
command of the Pacific fleet since
May, 1917, will be relieved from that
duty on April 30.
The Berlin 7-welf Uhr Blatt reports
that 157 persons had been killed, dnd
wounded in the fighting between |
troops and strikers at Dusseldorf.
-
iker, secretary of the India Home
Rule league at Chicago.
The soviet republic in Munich was
overthrown Friday by force of arms. |
movement
antl-bolshevik
among the peasants and middle clas
ses in Bavaria is spreading.
The
Former King Ltidwig of Bavaria
crossed the Swiss frontier recently.
He has taken up residence in the
home for aged Catholic priests at
zizers in the canton of Grisons.
Marshal Foch in answering a Ger
man protest, has declared that his
decision is final regarding the occu
pation of Grieshlem, five miles west
of Darmstadt, the capital of Meuse- 1
Darmstadt. I
I
I
I
!
I
As a result of the strike of
bank employes in Berlin the German
government April 12 was unable to
| ''emit. 355,000.000 marks, represent-1
' n » P art °F * }le payment due the al
lietl powers on food • shipments. |
The German government has an
nounced the entente powers have in
formed it that Bavaria is not to be j
included in the conclusion of peace f
and that measures will be taken to
prevent any entente foodstuffs from
reaching Bavaria.
-
Pleasanton, Cal.—Mrs. Phoebe Ap
person Hearst, widow of the late Geo.
Hearst of California, and mother of
William Randolph Hearst, the pub
Usher, at her home here Sunday aft
er an illness of several weeks. She
was 76 years old.
Delpine, Mont.—William I. Law
rence, one of New York's oldest resi
dents and a sôn of William Bach
Lawrence, a former governor of
Rhode Island. Mr. Lawrence was 91
years old. and was born at the Amer
ican embassy in London while his fa
ther was charge d'afi'airs at the
court of St. James. He was a des
cendant of Major Thomas Lawrence,
tlie colonial founder of Newton, now
a part of New York city.
NOTED PERSONS DIE
a
MANY YANKS IN FRONT LINE.
Americans Held 83.4 Miles of Trenches
When Armistice Signed.
Washington. 1). ('.—The American
army in France on the day the armis
tice was signed held 83.4 miles of bat
tle front, or 21 per cent of the entire
line. General March gave the divi
sions of the front that day between
the allies as follows:
French, 55 per cent; United States,
21 per cent; British, 18 per cent; Bel
gians, 6 per cent.
October 10 tlie Americans held 23
per cent of the line.
Berlin.— The Berlin police force lias
become so ineffective and so power
less to check street gambling, plan-:
dering and daylight robberies aggre i
gating millions of marks that the
municipal assembly has unanimously j
adopted a resolution to turn over the
police to Prussia, providing the state |
is willing to assume charge.
Employment Offices Reopened.
Washington, D. C.—Aided by large
contributions from, states, cities and
individuals, the federal employment
service lias found it possible to re
open all of its field offices, which
were closed when congress failed to
provide funds for the continuation of
the service, and to resume on a large
scale its plans for finding work for
returning soldiers, sailors and war
workers.
It
of
Berlin Police Hopeless.
'
I
Cleveland, Ohio. The United States
supreme court mandate, ordering that
Eugene V. Debs, socialist leader, be
taken to Moundsville, W. Va., ferlerai
prison to begin a 10-year sentence for
violation of tlie espionage act was re
ceived Saturday.
of
I).
Debs to Jail.
of
it takes years to acquire wisdom
and one minute to become a fool.—
Eugene Petzel.
.
Recent Happenings in This State
Given in Brief Items for
Busy Readers.

B. O. Gullup, a pioneer of Moscow, I
who amassed a small fortune as pro
' prietor of a restaurant for many
years, died recently.
Richard B. Ott, Alvin Denham and
Clarence Taylor of the Idaho univer
bar as a result of recent examina
tions.
Lawrence Worstell of Wallace, ap
pointed as a member of the industrial
accident board, took up his new duties
Monday. A. J. Priest, former Univer
sity of Idaho student, has been appoint
ed chief deputy under J. K. White,
commissioner of public welfare.
Fruit growers of Lewiston district
were apprehensive April 11 when the
temperature fell below the freezing
point. Reports from Lewiston or
chards indicate that, although there
was a frost, it was not sufficiently
heavy to injure the fruit buds seri
ously.
Lewiston shippers were advised
recently by the Idaho utilities com
mission that the federal freight and
traffic committee at Portland, Ore.,
would grant a hearing to Idaho ship
pers at Portland Thursday,- April 17,
1 on their claim for reduced distribut
! tng rates. The Idaho commission ap
proves the reduction sought.
in
of
a
to
the
is
in
|
-
Payne Sly is held at Lewiston to
the federal court for trial under bond
of $5000, charged with violation of
| the Mann act through transporting
Saratoga,
Mrs. Lydia Pace
from
Wyo., to Clarkston. His defense is
that Mrs. Pace is employed as his
housekeeper. Sly's arrest was made
by federal agents upon information
provided when Sly left Wyoming in
October last.
the
at
his
1
I
Two highway district bond elec
tions are called for Latah county for
I Thursday, April 24, to vote on a to
I tal of $535,000 in bonds to build
I highways. These are districts Nos.
1 and 2, known as the Thorn Creek
! and Moscow highway districts. Thorn
I Creek will vote on an issue of $160,
of 000 bonds and Moscow district will
vote on a proposition to issue $375,
to 000 in bonds.
al
|
Noted Speakers at Normal.
Several noted speakers have been
scheduled to visit the state normal
an- school,
in- Dr. H. H. Powers, noted traveler,
be j author and lecturer, will give two
f lectures on May 5 on subjects con
to nected with the problems of the
peace conference.
On May 8 Professor F. F. Nalder
of the University of California will
talk on "America's Heritage From
the World Conflict."
During the summer session of the
school, beginning June 10, Dr. Wil
Ap- liani C. Bagley. noted educator and
Geo. author of Columbia university, is
of to give a series of lectures before
pub- the student assemblies.
aft
She
Law
resi
of
91
fa
the
des
now
Hospital Commissary Formed.
The commission appointed to locate
two tuberculosis hospitals in this state
met at the state house Monday and
organized. Mrs. J. O. Athey of Boise,
credited with securing passage of the
act by the last legislature, was made
president of the commission; Dr. Wen
del of Sandpoint, first vice chairman:
Professor Atkinson of the Idaho Tech
nical institute at l'ocatello, second vice
president; J. K. White, commissioner
of public welfare, secretary.
Bandpoint« New Meadows, llailey,
Soda Springs, . Kuna, Lewiston, Wal
lace and other places are asking for
the hospitals. One of them is to he.
placed in northern Idaho and another
in southern Idaho.
The commission will visit.these sites
in person. The state hoard of equali
zation will levy the tax authorized by
the legislature during the next two
years by which $175,000 will be raised
to build the hospitals.
l)r. Atkinson was authorized to have
charge of the vocational education
when the hospitals are built and Dr.
Wendle was named to take charge of
the general plans and to arrange for
thearchiteets.
bat
divi
Bel
23
"Pep"—It's the thing which makes
the lambs gambol with glee, the colts
prance with joy, the calves throw up
their tails and run like fury, the birds
sing in split-throat notes, the frogs
croak upon the creek bank, the in
sects buzz and hum in the air, the
milkman whistle as he jogs along, the
blacksmith laughingly beat the Iron
into shape, the ployman urge his
horses with a "gee up there," the en
gineer wave a kiss to his sweetheart
as he throws upon the throttle, the
woodman smilingly plunge his axe
Into the giant tree, the banker and
lias merchant rush to their work with a
cherry "bye-bye", the mechanic and
plan-: laborer fairly dance to their jobs, tho
i soldier
the clinched jaws and courage that knows
j no fear, the life salesman hie to his
the calls with shoulders squared, pride
state | in his heart and nerves a tingle with
large
and
re
to
of
large
for
war
"go over the top'' with
' anticipation of new success. Oh,
''pep" is any thing that puts happi
I ness in the heart, energy in the body,
determination in the soul, and visible
that courage In the will.—Insurance World.
be
for
re
A production of 314,936 tractors in
the United States in 1919 is estimated
by manufacturers reporting to tho of
fice of farm equipment control, United
States department of agriculture. The
reports obtained in a special inquiry
by the department show a production
of 132,697 tractors in 1918.
.

I
SENT BY U. S. IN MARCH TO
OUR HERB HOOVER REPORTS
EUROPE—IT COST NINETY
FIVE MILLION DOLLARS.
is
Consisted mostly of Cereals, Rice,
Peas, Beans, Meats, Condensed
Milk and Clothing—Famine
Sections Relieved.
Paris.—Herbert Hoover, director
general of relief, has issued a review
of the measures carried out by the
United States, Great Britain, France
and Italy during March. The total
value of supplies distributed was ap
proximately 095,000,000, of which all
but about $2,500,000 was furnished on
a basis of deferred payment.
The supplies amounted to 388,041
tons, divided as follows:
Cereals, 316,243; rice, 12,642; peas
and beans, 8053; fats and meat, 34,
176; condensed milk, 4122; colthing,
4483; miscellaneous, 8322.
Poland received 51,745 tons of sup
plies.
Under the terms of the armistice
arrangements for shipment through
Danzig, says Mr. Hoover, have pro
ceeded with great smoothness, as
hihg as 4500 tons a day by rail from
Danzig to Warsaw having been trans
ported. All sections threatened with
critical famine conditions have re
ceived relief.
Finland during March received 26,
344 Ions of supplies.
Preliminary measures for the es
tablishment of regular supplies to the
coastal areas in the Baltic states, says
the review, have been undertaken.
Czecho-Slovakia Gets Breadstuffs.
Czecho-Slovakla has received 29,
911 metric tons, including 26,280 tons
of breadstuffs.
Herman Austria—The total deliv
eries from allied sources during
March were 38,156 metric tons. Sup
plies amounting' to about 10,000 tons
were also made under replacement
arrangement from neighboring coun
tries. The situation at Vienna, says
Mr. Hoover, is extremely bad.
Greater Serbia—The relief of the
entire area of Jugo-Slavia, Montene
gro and Serbia, is conducted as a sin
gle unit. The total distribution in this
territory amounted to 33,920 metric
tons.
Rumania—Total rediveries were 26,
967 metric tons of breadstuffs.
Turkey Is Given Aid.
Turkey—During March 2298 tons
were distributed in Constantinople.
Armenia-—The relief administration
supplied to Armenia 5251 tons of
breadstuffs and condensed milk. In
addition three shiploads of food,
clothing and medical supplies have
been delivered.
Belgium—Supplies to the amount of
145,604 tons were delivered in March.
Tltis included 113,173 tons of bread
stuffs.
Northern France—The progressive
resumption of the revictualing of the
occupied regions by the French food
ministry, says Mr. Hoover, has pro
ceeded so lUr as to render it possible
gradually to withdraw measures that
have been continuous for over four
and a half years and such withdrawal
should be complete by May 1. During
March a total of 69U6 tons of food
stuffs and clothing were sent into
devastated areas.
Supplies More to Germany.
Germany—Financial, tonnage and
food arrangements were« completed at
Brussels on March 14, the first Ger
man ships arriving at allied ports
about March 22, and on March 25
foodstuffs wear actually .delivered in
side German territory, consisting of
6767 tons of breadstuffs and 740 tons
of fats. The available supplies from
headquarters should permit the im
port of approximately 200,000 metric
tons during April.
Other relief measures have been
inaugurated relating to Bulgaria,
Russian prisoners in Germany, refu
gees from south Russia and in other
directions.
a
GEN. ZAPATA VICTIM
OF FEDERAL RUSE
Mexican Rebel Leader Fell Into the
Trap Set by the Forces of
the Government.
Mexico City.—General Emiliano Za
pata. the rebel leader of southern Mex
ico, news of whose death reached this
city Saturday, was killed April 10 din
ing an engagement between his troops
and government soldiers who had by a
ruse entered his camp at Hacienda
Chinemeca, near tlie village of Petlai
cingo, Morelos.
All England Hollers.
London.— lb-ess and
commons both
are discontented and angry with tlie
delay in making peace and with the
rumored terms of the treaty and the
league of nations.
British Occupy Trebizond.
London.—British forces liav
pled Hreblzond, Asiatic Turkey.
e occu
3T
IS NO PROVISION TO
ENFORCE DRY LAW
Merely Up to the Federal District At
torneys, Says Commissioner
of Internal Revenue.
Washington.
-En forcement of war
time prohibition, which becomes ef
fective July 1 is not lodged with
the internal revenue bureau or with
any other government agency, but
is merely left to the United States
attorneys,
Revenue
Daniel C. Roper declared Monday
aftei*' analysis of all statutes and
ulations.
Commissioner
reg
Intimation that because of the
parent difficulty of enforcement the
president or congress might be cal
led on to postpone the law's opera
tion was given by Mr. Roper in
statement,
this
ap
a
In
connection it
became
known Monday that a number of ad
ministration officials and advisers of
the president had recently urged
him to prevent prohibition from go
ing into effect July 1 by proclaiming
the completion of demobilization by
that time. This view is understood
to be held by Commissioner Roper,
who is represented as believing pro
hibition can not be enforced ade
quately without specific legislation
establishing an enforcement agency.
all
on
as
re
26,
es
the
29,
the
sin
this
26,
of
In
of
the
pro
that
four
into
and
at
Ger
25
in
of
tons
im
BIG MASSACRE OF
KOREANS CHARGED
Native Chriatian Pastor Declares 1000
Unarmed Persons Were Killed
in Three Hours.
San Francisco.—Japanese began
what was described as a "massacre"
in Korea at Seoul, the capital, during
a demonstration March 28, according
to a cablegram received here Monday
by the Korean National association
from a native Christian pastor.
The cablegram was filed from Shang
hai. According to officials of the Ko
rean National association here, the in
formation was sent by messenger from
Seoul to Shanghai by the association's
representative at Seoul.
LOSSES ARE $5,000,000,000.
Reparation to Be Asked of Germany
by British Dominions.
Melbourne, Australia.—Reports ca
bled here of the proceedings of the
reparation cortimission of the peace
conference place the losses of the '
British dominions and colonies for
which payment shall be asked from
Germany at $5,000,900,000.
Australia's total casualties during
the war, with the figures brought up
to February 8 of the current year,
totaled 307,900.

MEDAL FOR ALL SOLDIER8
Will Commemorate Part in War
For World Freedom.
Washington. — After prolonged
conferences with all the allied
governments, General March an
nounces a design has been ap
proved for issuance to every sol
dier who parcipitated in the great
war on the allied side of a "vic
tory medal" in commemoration
of his service to civilization.
The obverse side of the medal
will bear a winged victory, and on
the reverse will be in the lan
guage of Yhe country by which it
Is issued, the words "the great
war for civilization,"
arms of the allies. A campaign
ribbon also has been adopted to
consist of a "double rainbow"
series with red in the center.
This ribbon will be similar for all
armies and is to be issued in the
United States very soon.
A lapel button for civilian wear
also has been adopted.
and the
WASHINGTON.
Fred K. Baldwin of Spokane has
been appointed by Acting Governor
Hart to stlcceed the late W. II. Coch
ran on the state board of control.
Charles E. Maynard of Colton lias
received the croix de guerre which
was awarded by the French govern
ment to his son, the late First Lieu
tenant Boyd Maynard, former state
college student, who lost his life
while leading his company of ma
rines.
Vaults in the old
other unusual
courthouse and
storage places were
pressed into service to store as legal
evidence over 3150
quarts of bonded
whisky, said to Be worth about $56,700
at alleged bootleggers' prices, at Se
attle Monday, seized in
the race
the
ft shed near
track by Sheriff Stringer.
An arrangement has been made to
appropriate $25,000 for tlie improve
ment ot the road from Chelan down
to the Columbia river at Chelan falls.
A similar sum will be spent out of
federal aid funds so that there will
lie $.,0.00(1 available DiIm year for per
manent improvements on this
This is a part of state
Za
this
din
a
road,
loud No. 10,
primary highway by action
ol tlie last legislature.
made
a
Delegates from the Sea'ttle chamber
of commerce will leave for east of tlie
mountains this week to take up plans
for a fete on May 3 at tlie summit of
bnoqualinle pass, in celebration of the
earliest opening in history of tho Sun
set highway*, it
tlie
the
the
w as utinounced Monday.
I lie pass is expected to be opened to
traffic May I.
Hast and West Side
planned for the May 3
A great gathering of
motorists is
event.

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