OCR Interpretation


Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, April 18, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1919-04-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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TAKES TWO FORMS
I
A,
bulk
THE PARTIALLY TA* EXEMPT
NOTES BEAR- 4% PER CENT
Interest.
l
fail',
8.
ONLY FOR $4,500,000,000
Wholly Tax Exempt Notes Will Pay
3% Per Cent.—Belated War Ex
penses Will Be Financed by
Other Forms of Security.
@17.
« a 1
17;
$11®
Washington, D. C.—Terms of the
Victory loan are announced by Sec
retary Glass, as follows:
Amount, $4,500,000,900, oversubscrip
tions to be rejected.
Interest, 4% per cent, for partially
tax exempt notes, convertible into
3% per cent notes wholly tax ex
@
empt.
Maturity four years, with the treas
reserving the privilege of re
11;
ury
deeming the notes in three years.
The 3% per cent notes to be issued j
later also may be converted subse
quently back into 4% per cent notes.
The 4% per cent securities are to
be exempt from state and local tax
ation, except estate and inheritance
taxes, and from normal rates of fed
eral income taxes. The 3% per cent
securities are exempt from all l'ed
spot
East
eral, state and local taxes exPept
estate and inheritance taxes.
This will be the last Liberty loan.
Secretary Glass explained, although
there will be other issues of govern
ment securities to finance belated war
These will not be floated
still
the
and
ly
the
for
are
ty.
is
of
the
a
expenses,
by popular campaigns
Former Issues Not Convertible.
None of the past issues of Liberty
bonds are convertible into Victory
loan notes, and there are no specific
provisions in the terms of the Vic
tory issue serving directly to main
tain market prices on past issues.
The official opening date is April
The drive will continue three
weeks until May 10.
21 .
Statement by Glass.
'Tn fixing the terms of the issue,"
said Secretary Glass," announcement
of the Victory loan, "the treasury has
been guided largely by the desire to
devise a security which will not only
prove attractive to the people of the
country in the first instance, but
terms of which should prove a good
market for the notes after the iden
tical prices of the two series; and
should not affect injuriously the mar
ket for the existing bonds of the Lib
erty loans.
"I am sure that the people of Amer
ica will subscribe to this Victory loan
in the same spirit of patriotism that
they have shown in the past to the 1
/ .. . .. . v. ; tor
end that the notes may be as w idely | g
distributed as possible, and that our jj
banking institutions may be left free a
to supply the credit necessary for
the purpose of industry and com
and the full employment of
at
merce
labor.
The Victory Liberty loan will take
the form of 4% per cent, three or
four year convertible gold notes of
the United States, exempt from state
end local taxes .except estate and in
heritance taxes and from normal fed
eral income taxes. The notes will be
convertible, at the option of the hold
er, throughout their life into 3% per
cent «three or four year convertible
gold notes of the United States, ex
empt from all federal, state and local
taxes, except estate and inheritance
taxes. In like manner tlie 3% per
cent notes will be convertible into
9
2
the 4% per cent notes.
"The notes of both series will be
dated and bear interest from May 20,
1919, and will mature on May 20,
1923. Interest will be payable on De
cember 15, 1919, and thereafter semi
annually on June 15 and December
15, and at maturity. All or any of
ihe notes may be redeemed before
maturity at the option of the United
June 15 or December 15,
States on
1922. at par and accrued interest."
The interest rate of 4% per cent is
the highest borne by any of the war
issues.
12th District Loan Quote.
Sun Francisco.—The 12th federal
reserve bank district's quota will be
$301,500,000. San Francisco's quota,
it was announced, will be $80,907,500.
Western Stetee' Quotes.
$ 44,3652250
11.039,650
26,798,400
. . 191.427.300
3.611,700
13,851.900
964,900
4,788,000
. 4,662,900
Washington
Idaho
Oregon
California
Nevada
Utah
Alaska.
Hawaii
Arizona
Prince Joa
J. Welsh Quits Federsl Job.
Washington, 1>. C.—The resignation
of John Walsh of Washburn. Wis.. the
chief counsel of the federal trade com
mission, has been accepted.
Oh, Joy!
Geneva.—The former
chim, youngest son of the former Ger
man emperor, hopes to emigrate to
America after peace is signed.
Holt & Buskirk have engaged in
the grocery business at Sherwood, near
Tacoma.
snips
agus,
new
vegi
MARKET REPORT
Portland.
I Rutter—Prints
extras, 59c; cubes
extras, 59c; prime firsts, 58e. Butter
Portrond delivery: No. l sour'
cream, tile. j
Oats—No. 2, white feed, $19. liar
ley—Standard feed, $51.50; standard and
A, $:
bulk .
*
!; Ea-stern oats and corn in
Oats—No. 1 white, $ts; 18-lb.. ket
dipped, white, $19.50. Corn —No. ii
yellow, $iliI ; No. :t mixed, $59. | who
Cattle—Steady; steers, best. $i:i® i also
l i.'q; good to choice, [email protected];
medium to good, [email protected]; common to to
fail', #'4i9; good to choice cows and .
heifers, $lo.:>[email protected] 12.25; medium to good
8. (S'; fair to medium, [email protected]; canners lion
[email protected]; bulls, [email protected]; calves, $9.50
@11.50; stoekers and feeders, $7® like
10.00. the
the
ly
as
Hogs—Steady. Prime mixed, $19
medium mixed, [email protected];
rough heavies, $17® 17.
@17.
« a 1 !
pigs, $10
bulk, [email protected]
Sheep—Steady ; prime lambs, $10®
17; fair to medium, $11® 15; yearlings
$11® 12; wethers, [email protected]]0; ewes, $0.50
@10.50.
for
Seattle.
Hogs
To.CO;
rough heavies, $17® 17.00; pigs, $17
@ 18.00.
— Steeady; prime, $19.25®
medium to choice, $19® 19.25;
Ciittle—Steady. Beef steers, $11.50
@14.50; medium to choice, $io.5()@
11; common to good, $7® 10; best
cows and heifers, [email protected]; common to
bulls, $0® 10; calves,
to
but
j good, $5® 7.50;
to
New York.
Copper dull; electrolytic, 15*4 @
15*4c. Iron steady and unchanged.
Metal exchange quotes lead dull;
spot and May $5. Spelter steady;
East St. Louis spot, $Ü[email protected]; May,
$0.12 @0.32.
ed
19
to
MARKET AT SPOKANE.
There is a general inclination to re
gard the situation with greater con
fidence as to the stability of future
prices. And general business, while
still "holding off" in some lines, is
generally gradually improving.. With,
the advent of necessary spring acti
vities, the expected resumption of
building activities and the certain un
dertaking of large scale public works,
demands must speedily be stimulated
and the slack of unemployment large
ly absorbed.
In this section interests centers in
the coming wheat crop, the prospects
for which, both in yield and in acreage
are thus far the best ever know. This,
with the price assured the producer,
promises a large income and prosperi
ty. Mining and lumbering, too, are
steadily getting onto a more satis
factory basis.
With the steady recovery in raw
cotton there is a firmer feeling in dry
gooiW' lines and more activity: wool
is unsettled and uncertain witli lots
of idle machinery. Drug and chemical
markets in general continue quiet with
the general trend continuing down
ward. In iron and steel, the disagree
ment as to whether present prices are
sufficiently redpeed continues, with a
fair seasonable business passing and
a further slight decline in nails.
Provisions.
a
,
in
to
Butter-Market is up 2 cents to ,
the 1 or P™t«. M for cartons and 9.1 @64
; tor butterlat. Quotations ought to be
| g 0 j ng down right now but there has
our jj een a scarcity of cream recepts and
a big demand for the manufactured
for product which has delayed the spring
decline, which may be expected to
of start, however, n about one week.
Eggs-—Local quotations unchanged
at $11.60, to the producer and $12.50
wholesale. Production is steadily en
larging, but demand is very active,
and thus the market sags very slowly.
or
of
in
fed
be
per
ex
per
into
Poultry—Spring offerings are com
ing to hand more freely and there has
been a drop on hens, springers and
roosters of about 2 cents,
geese and turkeys nominal.
Fresh Meats—Receipts at the X'nion
Stock Yards for the week ended April
9 were 4887 cattle, 26 calves, 92.1 hogs,
and 126 sheep. Hog market continues
strong and 40 cents higher at a top of
$19.40 Cattle prices are also 50 cents
higher at the top. Sheep unchanged.
There have been no changes in the
dressed list this week.
Lard and Cured Meats—There have
been no further advances since those
noted in the past few weeks.
Hides aihl Wool—Calfskins are up
2 cents to 34 and kips 1 cent to 19.
Other hides and wool unchanged. The
new wool market is still very uncer
tain and the clip will probably be
largely consigned.
Ducks,
be
20,
20,
De
of
15,
is
war
Fruit* and Vegetable*.
The movement of new stuffs is ex
panding very rapidly and under gen
erally favorable conditions. Some old
stocks that are scarce are closing
stronger. 'Demands seasonable.
Citrus Fruits—There is a wider
rauge, both ways, to orange prices,
due to greater variations In qualities.
Lemons are unchanged and season
ably firm.
Apples—The apple deal generally is
closing Btrong. Local quotations are
slightly higher at [email protected]$4 for fancy and
$W>[email protected]$2.25 for cooking stock, and
really desirable stocks command a
premium above these figures, where
fore, movement has elowed up, but
stocks are well cleaned out through.
be
Other fruits—Arizona grapefruit is
higher. Pineapples are in and straw
berries from I Louisiana are moving in
a limited way. Other fruit* are in
seasonable supply and demand with
out material change in prices.
Potatoes—There have been good end
of season shipments and moderate ad
in prices in all sections. Lo
cal quotations are arriving from Cali
fornia quoting at 20 cents a pound.
Sweet* unchanged at $7 and very
Joa- scarce.
the
com
Ger
to
in
near
vances
Cabbage- Old stocks are generally
scarce and prices advancing In most
markets. Ixical quotations are up to
@7 cents, according to condition,
California winningstadt
etc., anil
quotes at 7 cents.
Other Vegetables—Carrots, turnips,
California cauliflower, rutabagas, par
snips and tomatoes are higher. Aspar
agus, rhubarb and head lettuce have
declined. Hothouse cucumbers and
new California turnips are in. Other
vegi tables seasonable and unchanged
Wheat—Under conditions previously
j noted, the market generally (in this
country) and locally, continues strong
and everything offffered bv dealers Is
Grain, Flour and Feed.
*
readily sold. Millers are in the mar
ket and are taking freely of all gov
eminent holdings. Country dealers
| who have been carrying any wheat are
i also reducing their holdings, as the
basic price with the carrying charges
to be added makes the wheat quite
. high. New government orders for the
present month will take over 4*4 mll
lion bushels of our surplus and it will
only require another order or two
like the present one to clean up all
the wheat left from the 1918 crop. The
trade is marking time and waiting on
the President to regulate the 1919
crop. Locally quotations are nominal
ly $2.09, $2.07, $2.05 and $2.02, but
as noted last week a considerable ,
Generally and
100
premium is exacted,
locally a rycorcl crop is expected.
Flour With the premium demanded
for wheat, flour has been obliged to
advance and a differential has been
established again on hard wheat pu- "
tents which are now $11.40, soft pa
tents $ 11.20 and second $ 11 . 00 .
.'97
hut
Hi
Feed Alfalfa and corn are up $:'■
to $:;:: and $7:: and $75 respectively.
Bran and shorts are down to $1.00 a
sSek. Oats and barley are unchanged list
but the rolled product is off $1 to $09.
BREVITIES.
The War Trade Board lias announc
ed that the importation of lemons is
now permitted by the customs auth
orities of Australia to the extent of
19 per cent of the average quantity
imported yearly by eacli importer dur
ing the three years ending June 39,
luis, or, at tlie option of the importer,
to the extent' of 19 per cent of the
quantity imported during the year end
ing June :;o, 1918. Under this ruling
importations must be made prior to
June i.
is
in
a
Frank W. Woolworth, who started
a 5 and 19 cent store at Utica, N. Y.
Hi years ago and eventually became
tlie millionaire proprietors of a great
chain of these stores in the United
states, Canada and England, died
April s, at his country home at Glen
cove, Long Island. In addition to es
talili*hining a business with profits
said to be nearly $8,000,090 yearly,
Mr. Woolworth built the celebrated
51-story Woolworth building in lower
New York, said to be tlie tallest build
died and four Holstein-Friesian cows i b
_I .» niiro K.-ods .,, 1,1 <;•» »»nies- and »
mire hred bulls are to leave this coun
•i 'specially equipped
irunminri "Pnsminri**" ivive »»pen is -1
sued to Havre Franc* and iron! there ! l!
, I, ,. , 1 ) 1 ,, ...ill i„, se ,ii to devastated
districts where they will do their bit :
in hrinirimr hnrk henlth and hunniness ,
tn tli<> children of those regions. The
cittic were mire based bv the French !
l-titrh ronimission and at the commis* ! ^
^ fX request^riry siieciahsts oTthe ,
rnite.i Demirtnient of Aaricul* *
inre inaUtcd in selecting tlie animals !
tme assisted in selecting the animais. |
;
ing the world.
American dairy cattle are to follow
American soldiers to France. One him
try shortly on
,
be
to
en
Site for World's Capitol.
Geneva.—It is reported that a mag
nificent site on tlie shore of l.ake
Geneva and facing Mont Blanc lias
been chosen for the building which
will in future he tlie capitol of the
league of nations. Tlie people of the
city are rejoicing over the decision of
tlie commission on the league of na
tions at Paris,
greatly enhanced the popularity of
President Wilson and America in tlie
Alpine republic.
The decision has
of
the
up
19.
The
be
New Command for Gen. Flagler.
Washington, D. C.— Major General
Clement A. F. Flagler, who was in
command of tho 42d (Rainbow) divi
sion, was recently assigned t
mand Camp Bowie, Texas,
about April 25, and Major General C.
S. Farnsworth was appointed to com
mand Camp Henning, Ga.
■ffective !
com
McAdoo Is Optimistic.
T believe that tlie
Victory loan will be oversubscribed,
just as the Liberty loans were liefere
if 1 know anything about my coun
trymen and my country.'' says W. G.
McAdoo.
Portland. Ore.
Get More Time.
Further extension to June of the
time for filing corporation income and
profit tux returns was ordered Monday
by Internal Revenue Commissioner Ro
per.
ex
gen
old
is
are
and
and
a
but
Two cowboys in the wild west
agreed to settle their differences with
revolvers. Both were dreading the or
deal. Patrick showed it most. His
knees knocked, together to such an
extent thut they affected his aim.
"Look here!" he said at last to his
opponent, "Will you, as a favor, allow
me to rest by leg against this mile
stone to steady myself?"
"Yes," said the other man, trying
tn control his voice, "if you allow me
to rest my leg against the next."
"Where did you find the prisoner,
constable?" asked the magistrate. "In
Trafalgar Square, sir," was the reply.
"And what made you think he was
intoxicated?"
throwing his walking stick into tho
basin of the fountain and trying to
entice one of the stone lioiiB to go and
fetch it out again."—Tit-Bits.
is
in
in
with
end
ad
Lo
Cali
very
"Well, sir, he was
Colonel: "George, what is your
girl like? Is she brunette or blond
or—?"
Rastus: "Well, colonel, I believe
she is what you call a silhouette."
most
to
Customer—Give me a bottle of
Dopem's stomach bitters.
Druggist—We haven't it in stock,
madam, but here's something just as
bad.
for
at
; past
i
I at
at
I Hutte
struct
The
the
The
IGNITES GASOLINE ON A SUBMA
Flames Damage Upper Works, Flags,
, , , ,
i,U,8ion whlch sent 11
100 feet into the air. 10 men were
RINE CHASER IN SAN DIEGO
HARBOR—TEN INJURED.
TWO BOYS ARE FATALLY HURT
j the
liars
of
Papers and Equipment—Most of
Injured Are Boys From the
Northwestern States.
price
nect
ties,
ing
tiie
that
says
(he
to
are
to
In a gasoline ex
torch of flame
Sail iDego, Cal
burned, two probably fatally, on the
to
"
United States submarine chaser
.'97 at the» municipal pier Monday. All
hut on > of the men were attached to
The lOili, C. G. Johnson,
was driver of an oil truck from which
gasoline was being pumped into a 660
gallon storage tank on the chaser. The
No.
Hi
craft.
$:'■
a
list of injured follows:
Ensign Allen T. Belknap, of Niles.
Mich., commander.
•I. F. Barron, Worcester, Mass., ma
chinist's mate.
is
of electrician.
E. J. Gaynor, Portland. Ore.
G. L. Young. San Francisco, radio
39, ohinist's mate
the
to
T. .1. Perrigo. Redmond, Wash.
K. A. Zastrom, Seattle, Wash., ma
J. Chudderdon, Acra, N. Y„ seaman.
K. I). Drake, Trident, Mont., quar
termaster.
W. W. Conover, San Francisco, a
quartermaster.
C. G. Johnson, San Diego, driver of
truck.
Y.
Wheat Farmers Will Prosper.
t<i
Forecast by the department of agri
culture Tuesday that tlie nation's win
1er wheat crops would total 837,000,000
es bushels I he largest crop ever grown,
aroused immediate speculation as to
Hie cost to the government of such an
enormous yield. Under the bill passed
by congress in the closing days of
Hie last session the government is oh
ligated to pay the difference between j
the guaranteed price ol $2.2.> a bushel |
and I lie world market price for every I
i b " al,el ' n . ot „ t <, " l Ll.|' i " ter ' but °V
» " , at i ,,0( * U(M «- i
le l(,ta v;,lup . ol t ! u ' wint ^ r wheat i
0,1 tlie ,)asis an #:17,000,000 -1
is -1 )US ie * l ' n, P lorecast would he $1,891,
! l! '°' 00 "' The 8l ' rin * whea . t cro »- ,>an |
1101 , )e ustmiated at this time, but of
bit : ÎU-len mm mid^'lîiii'oiïn bush' 1 '
, , en •- -and ooo bush
The W1Cl woul< ! increase the total!
! val ! le ()t mitions wheat to about ■,
! ^ : * ,,,00 * n00,(M,0,00 °*
, 1 Tllt ' " art of " li8 *-*.300.000.000 that
* ie K° vernrnent must pay to maintain y
! Kuanuiteet ^ l ,rice was problema- 1
| tical> ()fficials declared. It was said
; that the factors influencing the world
market price, such as production iii
mag
l.ake
lias
the
the
of
na
of
tlie
I
Argentlna, Australia and other coun
tries, and the European demand, were
too numerous to make any prediction
at this time. I
Officials expressed the belief that'the
there would he a good foreign demand]
for American wheat which would take 0
care of the nation's surplus and while
the loss to the government through
mount far
has
its price guarantee may
into the millions of dollars, so far as I
the actual wealth of the country was ]
concerned it simply will lie taking
money from one pocket and putting
it into another.
in
divi
C.
com
Tuesday's forecast also 'indicated
that America will have a greater sur
plus than ever before.
States requires for its own yearly con
sumption about 5.1 bushels of wheat
! for each person within it. With ap
proximately 110,000.090 people in the
United States, and adding approxi
mately 75,099,999 of wheat which is [
necessary for feeding purposes, the ]
demands of this country this year are
estimated at more than 650,000,000
bushels.
With a spring wheat production es
timated at from 225,999,990 to 190,000
009 bushels is would appear tlint the
surplus available for export would he
In the neighborhood of 459,900,09(1
bushels.
A striking feature of the present
situation is a uniformly good condi-,
tion in practically all important wheat
producing states, ranging from 104 in
Ohio down to 90 in North Carolina,
among the states having 1,900,009
acres or more. Kansas, with approx
imately 11,000,090 out of the United
States' total of 49,900,000 acres, shows
a condition of 191. The present moist
ure conditions throughout the entire
country are verÿ favorable
The winter wheat promise on April
1 of 817,000,090 is nearly double the
yearly average production in the Unit
ed States for the five years before the
war (442,0000,990 in 1909-1913) and is
nearly 50 per cent larger than the pro
duction during the war years 1914-1918,
when the average was 562,000,000.
The United
com
tlie
liefere
coun
G.
the
and
Ro
west
with
or
His
an
his
allow
mile
trying
me
Treatment for Our Disabled.
Washington. D. C.—Free medical at
tention is the right of any man ac
cepted for military duty during the
war and later discharged for physical
disability resulting from injury or
disease in line of duty, says the war
risk bureau. Under provisions of tlie
war risk act medical treatment will
be provided by the bureau of war
risk Insurance to all men who are
10 per cent disabled and can trace
their disability to military or naval
service.
"In
reply.
was
tho
to
and
was
your
blond
R. R. Expressmen eGt More Pay.
Washington—Wage increases aver
aging about $15 a month for about 69,
ÜU0 employes of tlie American Railway
Express company are announced.
of
stock,
as
INDUSTRY AND IMPROVEMENT. !
Om 1 week's campaign I
for a greater Whitman coll
at Walla Walla. April 9, with a fund
past the $>1,000 mark.
Senator A. W. Miles announces the
coming erection of a business block
at Livingston. Mont., that will be built
at a cost of $150,000.
Hard surfaced
Hutte and Helena. Mont . will bi
struct cd
The proposed highway will go through
the Homestead l'ass and Whitehall.
The estimated cost is $18,009 a mile.
raise funds |
that
or
this
ket
and
to
ly
ing
I at
I
a
in
lit
of
1
it
- ended sue!
you
roads,
connecting
eon
interests of the Upton pool consisting
ithin the next two years.
The biggest land deal on record in
the Rig Horn Hasln was recently
closed at Hardin. Mont., when the Two
liars Cattle Co. purchased all the land
The purchase
of 2$,OHO acres of land.
price was $1
,900.
Tlie election t
bonds foi
Franklin counties to construct a toll
bridge across the Snake river to con
nect Walla Walla and Franklin coun
ties, resulted April 8 in an overwhelm
ing vote in favor.
T. H. Horne, resident manager of
tiie Utah Idaho Sugar Company, an
nounced at Yakima. Wash., April S,
that lie is certain the company would
complete one of the two unfinished
licet sugar factories in this valley, and
says that possibly both will lie finished
thus giving Yakima three $1,000,999
sugar plants.
The commissioners
Wash., April s, signed a formal agree
ment with the state highway depart
ment under tlie terms of which the
county agrees to pay over $12,990 to
(he state for the improvement of the
Rlewett pass road this year. Rids are
to be received by the United States
forest service at Portland, under whose
supervision the work is to be done, on
April 12. The cost of this work is
estimated at $180,000.
Warehouses to cost about $ 120,000
are going up in the Selah, according
to a survey made April 8. The grow
ers' service company is now complet
ing a warehouse which will hold lion
carloads and it is one of the largest
individual plants in the valley. Ritchey
and Gilbert are making an addition
tHeir quarters, which will have a
capacity of about loo carloads. The
Selah Fruit Growers, lue., are rebuild
ing their burned plant, while T. J.
Slusher is spending $.*>(),ooo on addi
tions to the present cold storage plant.
decide on issuing
10,990 in Wahl Walla and
Wenatcliee,
at
t<i
q-p,. trahir demonstration at Walla
walla, Wash., April 23, 24 and 25 will
t h' e greatest agricultural educa
j douai event in the history of tho
| American northwest,
I Hundreds of farmers will witness
°V clUal le8,s ° f tra Ç, tor8 a " d
i plements of every description. A 000
i acre wheat ranch near Walla Walla
-1 will be used for the ; ests. Many
dealers will be present to take advan
| tage of the opportunity to make a
personal inspection of tractors und
1 ' rU î' kS "f ' vatch ,,V? eir P erforraailce
under various conditions.
\ feature of the display will be the
■, newest and most scientific inventions
for the farm home—inventions that do
away with drudgery for the farm wife,
y () the Walla Walla exhibition be
1 comes an event of interest not only
to the farmer and the farmer's fam
\\y t but the dealer as well,
Walla Walla Tractor Demonstration.
I The exhibition already has the ap
p{-oval of the governors of Idaho,
Washington and Oregon, the hearty
approval of United States Senator
I Miles Poindexter, the cooperation of
that'the Washington and Oregon State
Agricultural colleges, the University
0 f Idaho, county and state engineers
over the Northwest and commercial
bodies in many cities.
be well represented at. the event.
.Montana will
I
]
MINISTER OF WAR
OF SAXONY SLAIN
He Was Killed by Disgruntled Sol
diers Who Had Been Re
fused a Hearing.
is [ disgruntled soldiers to whom the min
]
es
he
in
the
is
Copenhagen. Herr Neuring, war
minister in tlie government of Saxony,
was killed at Dresden recently by
ister had refused a hearing. Tlie war
ministry was stormed by demonstra
tors who dragged out Herr Neuring
and threw him into tlie Elbe, where
he was shot and kilted as he tried
to swim to the bank.
Wounded patients in the Dresden
hospital, according to a Dresden dis
patch dealing with the occurrence,
collected in the morning in the the
ater square to protest against an or
der issued by Herr Neuring to the
effect that tlie wounded in future
should receive only peace time pay.
Five or six hundred men formed a
procession to the war ministry and
sent a deputation to see the minister
who refused, howover, to receive them.
Upon this, the crowd, incited by
communist speakers, stormed the en
trance to the building. The sentries
used their weapons, but were over
powered. Government troops were
summoned, but they declared they
would not attack the crowd and went
off after surrendering their arms.
Turkish Officer Hanged.
Constantinople.—Kemal Bey, gov
ernor of Diarbekr, lias been publicly
hanged in Bayazid square in Stam
boul in the presence of the military
governor of Constantinople and other
high officials. Kemal Bey was sen
tenced to death as one of those re
sponsible for the Armenian deporta
tions and massacres in the Yozghad
district.
at
ac
the
or
war
tlie
will
war
are
May Impeach Iowa Governor.
Des Moines, Iowa.—Charging him
with malfeasance in office for his part
in the Rathbun pardon case, the Iowa
house Judiciary committee presented
a majority'report to the house, rec
ommending impeachment of Governor
W. I). Harding. A minority report will
recommend a censure.
69,
! Advertised Goods Doubled Business.
| 1 am the fellow w ho used t
a bitter enemy
but wbo
In this letter I
■ I make the manufacturer's
ork for tue, says a mi r
l'ublic Ledger
III the llrst place, I read very rare
fully the advertising pages
magazines and
that circulate in my locality and mark
or clip out the advertisements of
goods that 1 sell. I might say, also,
that I have another reason in doing
this to keep in touch with the mar
ket ami learn what the new styles
and inventions are. Hut to get back
to the other point 1 inako my news
paper advertising up to date and time
ly by featuring goods that tire be
ing advertised by the manufacturers
I at that time. When I write my copy
I have the manufacturer's advertising
before me and use considerable of his
copy. That lends a double punch, as
a repetition is a powerful selling fae
as witness the Hible. Once a
month 1 issue a circular, and feature
in it articles that have been adver
be magazines and newspa
pers during the last month.
I further make it a point to get
duplicates of the cuts the manufac
turer Inis used in his advertising.
This gives my ads a prominence that
could not be obtained otherwise. I
select from the manufacturer's stock
the display signs and fixtures that best
lit my store and make judicious use
of them in my wii.oows and inside.
1 have bins in the basement where
ibis valuable inater«i is stored and
catalogued so that I can quickly find
it when I want it again.
At small cost 1 had a carpenter
make frames on the order of an nrt
ist's easel, in which 1 can display
proofs or the actual ads that 1 clip. I
have three frames; one holds a news
paper page, another, slightly smaller,
to hold ads the size of a Saturday
Evening Host page, and a still smaller
one to hold quarter pages or the full
page of a small size magazine, such
as Scribner's. I put the ad in the
window with a display of the product
advertised.
My business lias almost doubled
since 1 started to push advertised
goods—do you wonder that 1 am en
thusiastic?
be
sue!
of
products,
light."
you In
advertising
chant in Retail
finally
the
saw
want to tell
uf die ini
new s paper
is
a
J.
tor.
liseil in
I am the fountain-head whence
springs the majority of your trouble
a and worry.
I am the key to the problem why
■""* lhan 15 ' 000 retailers fail every
year.
I am the why and the wherefore, the
direct and proximate cause, the germ
do and the genesis of unsuccessful mer
chandising.
be- 1 am the sticker, the shelf-lounger,
the left-over, the nameless child of an
unknown father.
I Am Your Worst Enemy.
1 am the ruler of retail reverses.
I am the lord high potentate of fail
ure.
1 am the reason for that downward
slant on your profit curve.
1 am the cause of the silent sickness
that stills your cash register bell.
I am the origin of dissatistied cus
tomers and loss of trade.
I am the leaven of uncertainty in
the midst of certain prolits.
I am the element of chance that
turns a winning business into a losing
gamble.
I
I am the unadvertised product!-^
Retail Public Ledger.
ap
of
Cuticura Comforts Baby's Skin
When red, rough and itching with hot
baths of Cuticuru Soup and touches of
Cuticura Ointment.
Also make use
now und then of Hut exquisitely scent
ed dusting powder, Cuticura Talcum,
one
Toilet Trio.—Adv.
o' tlie indispensable Cuticura
will
"Half a dollar for such a little fish
as that!" cried the purchaser.
"You can't expect such large fish
now," explained the fish merchant,
patiently. "The fish have been scared
out of their growth by the subma
rines."—Washington Star.
Sol
min
war
by
HUSBAND
SAVES WIFE
war
tried
dis
the
or
the
pay.
a
and
them.
by
en
over
were
they
went
From Suffering by Getting
Her Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound.
Pittsburgh, Pa.—" For many months
1 was not able to do my work owing to
a weakness whi, li
caused backache
and headaches. A
friend called m y
attention to one cf
your newspaper
advertisements and
immediately my
husband bought
three bott'is of
LydiaE. Pinkham'u
Vegetable t'om
pound for me.
After taking two
bottles I felt fine
and my troubles caused by that weak
ness are a thing of the past. All women
who suffer as I did should try Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound."—
Mrs. Jas. Rohrberg, 620 Knapp St.,
N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Women who suffer from any form of
weakness, as indicated by displacements,
inflammation, ulceration, irregularities,
backache, headaches, nervousness or
"the blues," should accept Mrs. Rohr
1 »erg's suggestion and give Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound a
thorough trial.
For over forty years it has been
correcting such ailments. If you have
mysterious complications write for
advice to Lydia E.
Co., Lynn, Mass.
.1
SC:
gov
Stam
other
sen
re
l'iikham Medicine
him
part
Iowa
rec
will
Absolutely Nothing
Better than Cuticura
for Baby s Tender Skin
Soap 25c. Ointment 25 and 50c.

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