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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, May 09, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1919-05-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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WORLD'S EVENTS
a
IMPORTANT NEWS OF BOTH HEMI
SPHERES BOILED DOWN TO
LAST ANALYSIS.
ARRANGED FOR QUICK READING
Brief Notea Covering Happenings in
This Country and Abroad That
Are of Legitimate Interest
to All the People.
The Rumanian army is reported to
have occupied Budapest.
Petrograd has probably been' taken
by the Finns, according to recent
information.
A special session of congress will
be called by President Wilson to
meet about June X.
The Belgian cabinet has unani
mously decided to maintain her ter
ritorial and financial claims in their
entirety.
Demands for a 44-hour week and a
20 per cent increase in wages have
been made to the Canadian railway
war board from 35,000 railroad shop
men in Canada.
The U. S. S. Crane, the Victory
loan ship, arrived at Panama from
the Pacific coast and made the pas
sage through the canal in five hours
and nine minutps.
In Moscow at the seat of the Rus
sian soviet government the revolu
tion assumes deeper tones than the
agonized cry for food that one bears
everywhere in Petrograd.
Among the tank corps replace
ments arriving Saturday in New
York on the liner General Goethals
was First Class Sergeant William L.
Edison, son of Thomas A. Edison.
He says the big tanks were too slow.
An airplane in which General
Sykes, controller general of civil
aviation, was making a filght, fell
Saturday at Kenley, England, and
the pilot. Captain Knott, was killed.
General Sykes was badly shaken.
Inauguration of the experimental
Macon-Montgomery aerial mail ser
vice was a feature of the opening
Saturday of the Southern Aeronauti
cal congress at Macon. Georgia,
which will continue 10 days. Demon
strations of many different types of
machines in a flying contest was
on the afternoon's program.
NOTED PERSONS DIE
New York.—Father John J. Hughes,
head of the Paulist order in this
country.
Thomas Skelton
Harrison, formerly American minis
ter and consul general to Egypt,
aged 82 years.
Kalispell, Mont.—News of the death
at Los Angeles, of Hamilton Lee, age
65, a resident of Montana for 20 years,
was received Sunday.
Salt Lake City, Utah.—Mrs. Mar
garet Young Taylor, widow by plu
ral marriage of the late President
John Taylor of the Mormon church.
She was said to have been the last
surviving "widow" of the Mormon
president. Seven children and 33
grandchildren survive.
Philadelphia.
f
ALL WOUNDED MEN IN PARADE
Over 2000 Victim» of War Seen in
Line of March in Chicago.
Chicago.—Probably the first pa
rade in tills country made up exclu
sively of wounded soldiers, most of
whom are Chicagoans, was held
May 3. More than 2000 men from
hospitals filed through the downtown
district in the interest of the Vic
tory loan campaign.
The "wheel chair division." con
sisted of men who may never walk
again, was one of the features. Many
of the boys had two or three wound
stripes.
STORM SWEPT CANADA FARMS
Fall of Rain and Snow Will Benefit
Alberta Crops.
Edmonton, Alberta. — Farmers of
the Canadian prairies have named a
storm which raged May 3 the "ten
million dollar storm." as they esti
mate the fall of rain and snow is
worth many dollars to the crops al
ready in the ground
The storm blew down telephone
and telegraph lines, shattered rail
way schedules and blocked street
railway service. The blizzard was
of the worst ever seen here at
one
this time of year.
Mine Cage Drops 1100 Feet.
Pottsville, Pa.—A cage containing
10 miners dropped 1100 feet at tlie
Maple Hill shaft of tlie Reading com
Monday, resulting in the death
of one miner and serious injuries to
nine others, two of whom may die.
î pany
Crowd Views Hog Island.
Philadelphia. — With the war over
and no further reason for secrecy be
ing apparent, the great Hog island
• shipyard was thrown open to the gen
eral publie Su iday for tlie first time.
A crowd estimated at 50,960 visited
the plant.
IDAHO NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Recent Happenings in This State
Given in Brief Items for
Busy Readers.
An effort to obtain a band for
Moscow is being made.
Dr. Woodward, a well known den
tist In Troy for nearly 20 years died
recently in Seattle.
H. C. Allen, state highway engineer
of Idaho for the last year and a half,
dropped dead of heart disease at
Sprague, Wash., Sunday.
C. H. Sandberg and J. A. AJm
quist, residents of Moscow, have
been selected for fellowships in the
University of California next year.
J. G. Peterson of the United States
department of agriculture recently
conferred with O. P. Hendershott, sec
retary of the northwest live stock
show, regarding the conditions of the
live stock industry in Idaho.
Miss Marguerite Tyler of the de
partment of science at the Lewis
ton Normal is in north Idaho
tour of the larger towns visiting
high schools and conferring with
high school senior classes with
gard to higher , educational opportu
nities in Idaho state schools.
John W. Bates, convicted in the dis
trict court of assault with a deadly
weapon, was taken to Boise Sunday
to begin serving an indeterminate sen
tence of from one to two years. Bates
shot Jack Hamilton at Dixie last Sep
tember when the two men quarraled
at a sheep camp,
principal prosecuting witness.
Moscow men may soon be mak
ing engines for airplanes, in accord
ance with an invention of James H.
Richardson of that place,
been granted patents on his inven
tion, and a corporation has been
formed for the manufacture of the
new engine. He has also invented
a new steering gear for Ford auto
mobiles.
Dr. H. H. Powers, noted lecturer
aiu^ author, will deliver a series of
lectures before the normal school at
Lewiston during the week of May 26,
and will also deliver the
ment address on June 4. The lec
tures, which will concern the terms
of peace, will be open to the public.
Doctor Powers has traveled exten
sively in Europe and has kept in
close touch with the history and po
litical aspects of the belligerent
tries. He has published four books
on subjects connected with the
in
to
to
a
L.
of
on a
re
Hamilton was the
He has
commence
coun
war.
Bert S. Varian Named Judge.
Bert S. Varian, Weiser attorney,
has been appointed by our gover
nor as Judge of the Seventh Judicial
district to succeed the late Issac N.
Smith, who died
in Boise from the
after effects of Spanish influenza.
Judge Varian will take up his du
ties immediately,
is for the remainder of Judge Smith's
term, which expires on the first
Monday in January, 1923. Judge Va
rian has been a practicing attorney
of Weiser for 20 years. He is the
son of Judge Varian of Salt Lake.
His appointment
33
Victory Loan Report Saturday.
Reports received at Victory loan
headquarters of this state Saturday
indicate tremendous strides made by
Idaho
toward tlie state's Victory
bond quota. Bingham county was
the only county to report over the
top so far. Others are expected.
Chairman Flint of Idaho county re
ports $200,000 subscribed. Payette
county leads the state with an over
subscription of $28.000.
Gold Star Day.
Shoshone county reports $783,000;
Valley county, $21,700; Jerome coun
ty. $92.000; BiBngliam county, $410,
000, its full quota; Washington coun
ty. $92,000; Bingham county, $410,
000. with balance guaranteed; Cari
bou county. $135.000, with balance
guaranteed; Gooding county. 90 per
cent of quota subscribed; Bonner
county, full quota in sight, with
Sandpoint alone subscribing over
$100,000; Blaine county, $40.000 in
voluntary subscriptions and the bal
ance guaranteed; Minidoka. 56 per
cent of quota raised; Clearwater,
$43.300. Many counties made an in
tensive campaign in honor of Gold
Star day as a tribute to Idaho's 500
sons who gave their lives in the
great war.
Asks Injunction Against Burleson.
Postmaster General Albert S. Bur
leson is-cited to appear in person or
through counsel, together with the
Mountain States Telephone and Tele
graph company, before the Third
Judicial district court of this state to
show cause why a permanent in
junction should not he issued against
them prohibiting the order of the
postmaster general increasing tele-,
phone rates for tbat company in j
southern Idaho from going into ef
feet Tudires Charles P McCartv and
f ( t Judges < haï les I. McCarty and j
Charles K Keddoch issued a tern
pui arv injunction Saturday on api#
cation of the public utilities ™m
mission of Idaho. The order was I
. . .. nn •
made returnable on JVIay 22 when
argument will be heard on the mer
its of the case.
in
of
of
!
I
I
a
is
at
to
Without consulting the commission
Postmaster General Burleson author
ized an increase in telephone rates
of approximately 50 cents a month |
(or all subscribers,
into effect on May
taken in
The order wont j
The action !
the district court temper-1
1
arily restrains the order from becom-jera!
ing effective. The commission di- 1
rectly attacks the jurisdiction of
Postmaster General Burleson in over
riding it ln the matter of régulât
BIG COST OF WAR
for
den
at
the
the
de
H.
the
of
at
26,
lec
in
po
SUPPORTED BY THE UNITED
STATES, SHE GAINS A
STRIKING VICTORY.
china;enters her protest
Final Draft of Treaty, in Form for
Germans, Is Completed—Italy to
Get Fium for 3-Year Period
Only—Pool All Ships.
Paris.—Belgium, supported by Amer
ica, gained a striking victory when
the peace conference awarded her full
war costs, inclusive of all damages
and expenses, in which is listed her
foreign loans. The total claims al
lowed aggregate about $6,000,000,000,
of which $500,000,000 is to be made a
priority in the payments by Germany.
America's loans to Belgium are to be
paid by accepting German obligations
in the place of Belgium. To no other
country is given the treatment
corded Belgium because she was vio
lated through no fault of her own.
Other important developments in
clude the announcement that China
ac
a
re
purposes to protest at a secret plen
ary session the Japanese settlement,
the inclusion in the treaty of Austrian
independence ,but no estoppel of her
continued separation from Germany
unless a union be desired by both
countries, and the settlement of the
shipping problem by pooling all ships
save those seized by America and
Brazil.
the
The final draft of the treaty
lias been completed in the form in
which it will go to the Germans
Wednesday of this week.
Efforts to keep the terms of the
treaty secret continue, although it
is almost certain now that personal 1
conversation between the "big three" i
and the Germans will be counten
anced. The announcement is made
that Austria has been directed to
send commissioners to Paris immedi
ately.
Oil
The decision of Premier Or- s
lando and Foreign Minister Sonnino
to return to Paris was taken spoil-!
taneously after conferences in Rome
Their objection to ruling of peace con!
ference has been righted
New "iork A nationwide demon
stration of prohibition forces to be
know" as the national circuit pro- j
ninition tours will start in this city
May IS as a preliminary to the na-,
tional convention of the Anti-Saloon
League of America, to be held in
Washington. May 18 to June 4.
a
Italian Decision Explained.
Paris.
N.
Will Boost Prohibition.
the
du
Va
the
Berlin.—A rebellion against the Co
burg dynasty at Sofia is reported.
ing rates of the public utility with
in its Jurisdiction.
by
Idaho New» Notes.
Mrs. W. L. laichte,, age 82, died re
cently at the, home of lier daughter,
Mrs. I). II. McGrath, in Lewiston.
K. ('. Boom \eft Sunday for St.
l-onis, Mo., as representative of sev
eral northern Idaho counties to the
American legion convention.
The Salmon River state bank and
the Whiteblrd state bank, of White
bird, have been consolidated under the
former name and Frank W. Ketten
bach of Lewiston lias been elected
president.
Pioneer Farm Changes Hands.
A. Ixingdon and S. Langdon have
bought the one-third interest of their
brother, George Langdon, in 320 acres
on the little Potlatch, east of Moscow.
The land has been farmed by A.
Langdon fr several years,
l-angdon and Samuel Langdon live at
Nampa and Payette, respectively. The
price is said to have been $100 an
acre. This transfer is interesting in
■ land was bought by Samuel
Langdon. father of tlie three brothers,
lor $1000, which
fair price.
the
re
per
in
bal
per
in
500
the
or
the
to
in
the
tele-, 17 rnnlpani( , s in 1916
in j for ms remaln to be received from
ef- *»,« /*_,,» u,,. „ -, , _ „ »
Hunter. Tamarack & Cub
j ler an(1 olller companies, but their
, ,, . . .... I
„ not been sufficient,
"1' t" figures of
I Î f® ' n , reduc '
tions result from curtailments in pro
dllctlon and hlgher Posls of
(ion
ti eorge
that the
regarded as a
was
Smaller Profits i
M ines.
Fourteen
mines of the
Coeur
d'Alene region of Idaho yeilded $7,
! 272,485 in net profits In 1918, accerd*
I ing to statements filed with the
iditor of Shoshone county at Wal
comparabie with net
I profits of $12,765.113
lilies in 1917
au
lace. This is
by 20 conipa
and with $12.154,620 by
Statements

ope ra
The gross receipts from 14 mines
was $24.093,203 in 1918, as compared !
with $39,67
$32.800,798
698 from 20 in 1917 and |
from
The
| tonnage
17 in
1916.
if 1918 was much less than
j that n! the two last previous years.
! The outlay for betterment
pairs
$86,-1
the !
I
and re
was less in 1918 than in sev
becom-jera! previous years. It included $92.
di- 1 240 by the Interstate Callahan,
of 692 by tin- Hercules, $821,504 by
Bunker Hill A- Sullivan and $14,700,
[by the Yukon Gold company.
SAY JAPS HOG'ITALL
GIVEN NO DETAIL OF SHANTUNG
SETTLEMENT WHEREBY JAP
AN MAY PROFIT.
HEADS IWIN TAILS YOU LOSE
n
H
Mikado's Nation Obtains More Than
It Has Ever Claimed eBfore—One
og the Big Three—England,
U. S.—France to Rear.
a
Paris.—Settlement of the Shantung
claims in favor of Japan promotes the
Nipponese to one of the big three
world powers, sharing this distinction
with the United States and Great
Britain, and dwarfing France, Ger
many, Austria and Italy, in the opin
ion of the Chinese peace delegates, an
opinion also shared by students of the
political situation.
Japan is immeasurably strengthen
ed in every dimension, besides gain
ing infinite prestige through her
smashing victory over Wilson's "14
points" in obtaining the former Ger
man concessions ot Kiau Chau, as
well as other rights and special priv
ileges in China, it is believed.
China Issues Statement.
The Chinese press bureau has is
sued another statement on the Kiao
Chau-Shantung settlement, as follows:
"New light on the settlement of
the Kaio-Chau-Shantung settlement
has made the Chinese delegation in
dignant. A member of the delegation
stated that, though three days have
elapsed since the settlement by the
council was announced, no details of
the settlement have reached the dele
gation. While still waiting in sus
I
in
it
1 pense ; the dfile B ation >> aa learned with
i sllrpr ' se ,bat clauses to inserted
in the peace trealy relatips to shan '
tunK K ° ,arther ,han waK evPn sus '!
to P ected -
Lavish Gifts on Japan. \
"Japan is given everything Germa- 1
nv obtained from China by aggres- ;
, 0 . ... ,,,
s !°" a,,<1 more - h,u ' 18 " iven a11 ,he |
nKhtM ' tltlp ® °'. i
lnK especially the territory of Kalo
Chau and , the railways ' m,nes and !
8ub,Pari,,e cables Germany acquired
by virtue ot ,he treaty of 1898 and ot
all other acts concerning the province
of Shantung. Japan Is given all the 1 .
rights in the Tsing-Tao-C'hina railway.
its brunches and the mines attached
be thereto, the submarine cables from 1
j Tsing-Tao to Shanghai and from
Tsing-Tao to Chefoo, and all German ;
na-, public property rights, movable and
immovable, in the territory of Kaio
in rhau Although China has the best
title t0 tbese rights , whlt . h ale all on j
Chinese territory, not a word is said
in the draft clauses as to what rights
China may expect to recover for her
.. . ... ... . .
self. It is entirely with Japan to say
what she will be pleased to return j
to China and what she will retain for
her own enjoyment.
!
"The important fact seems to be
altogether iguored that Shantung is
a Chinese province, the territory of
a partner in the war on the side of
the allies and associated powers. The
Tsing-Tao railway was built with Chi- J
nese and German private capital.
while the line of "SO miles is entirelv
bile'the line of 28 miles is entirely
in Chinese territory. To substitute
Japan for Germany's rights in this
territory is to greatlv endtnaer the
ter itoiy is to greatly endanger tlie
welfare and security of the Chinese
republic, because Japan is much near
er to China than Germany, and be
cause she already claims a sphere of
influence in Manchuria dose to the
north of Shantung.
A.
at
in
Shantung a Chinese Province.
»
government
their
I .
which was made possible through the
generosity ot the American people.
' 1 « ''"ty-tour hours after the signing
PRAISE OF GREECE
-;
Refugees Coming Back Home Saved !
to the United States for many tilings,
but she probably will remember tlie
longest tlie aid given by the American
RED CROSS WINS
From Pangs of Starvation—Relief
Work Is Speedy.
Xantlii, Greece.- Greece is indebted
a
, ,, . . .
Red Cross to the^50,000 or more ret
•ho have'been coming back !
I
ugees
from Bulgaria and Asia Minor over
every road and mountain pass. Un
able through its own agencies to care
for this immense number of homeless]
and destitute people the Greek gov-fens
eminent left the task to America'sl
big relief organization. King Alexan
der. Premier Venizelos and the Greek
already testified I
gratitude for this assistance, |

:
i
of the Armistice the Red Cross estab
lished relief stations at every point
in Bulgaria,
Turkey and Macedonia
over which these innocent victims of
! the
war were likely to come. It dis
trainload after trainload of
areas in which suf
fering was known to he worst.
| patched
supplies to tlie
Fight Against Typhus.
The stream of refugees has not yet
ceased, and the work
Gross continues,
! serious development of
refugees quartered
I Drama and this city.
the
of the Red
There lias been a
yphus among
in Kavulla,
in
MARKET REPORT
Corn, No. 3 yellow, $1.58%@1.63V&;
No. 4 yellow, $1.59® 1.62; No. 5 yel
low, $1.58Î[email protected] Oats, No. 3
white, [email protected]^; standard, 70*[email protected]
Rye, No. 2, $1.70. Barley, $1.14®1.21.
Timothy, [email protected] Clover, nominaL
Pork, nominal. Lard, $38.25. Ribs,
[email protected]
Butter lower; creamery, [email protected]
Eggs, higher; firsts, 41%@43c; ordi
nary firsts, 40®41c; at mark, cases
Included, 41Vè@43c; storage packed
firsts, 43%@44c; extras, 44V4c.
Hogs — Market opening strong;
closed mostly 10 to 15 cents lower.
Bulk, $20.30; heavy weight, $20.25®
20.40; medium weight, [email protected];
light weight, $19.65®20.30; light light
weight, $18.25® 18.85; sows, $18.25®
19.85; pigs, [email protected]
Cattle—Best beef steers steady;
other beef cattle 15 to 25 cents high
er; feeders strong; calves 25c higher.
Heavy beef steers, [email protected]; light
beef steers, $10.50® 17.85; butcher
cows and heifers, $7.65® 15; canners
and cutters, [email protected] 10.50; veal calves,
[email protected]; stocker and feeder
steers, $8.50® 15.50.
Sheep—-Market steady to 15c high
er; 1 best dry fleece lambs strength
ening most. Lambs, 84 pounds down,
[email protected]; 85 pounds up, $17.35®
19.60; culls and common, [email protected];
ewes, medium and good, [email protected];
culls and common, [email protected]
New York.
Copper quiet; electrolytic, 15>4®
15%c; iron steady and unchanged.
Metal exchange quotes lead weak;
8pot offered, $.4.40; July, $4.80; spel
ter steady; East St. Louis, spot, $5.98
@6.05; July, [email protected]
Portland.
Oats—No. 2 white feed, $54.50.
Barley—Standard feed,
standard A, $56.
Eastern oats and corn in bulk:
Oats—No. 3 white, $52; 38-lb. clip
ped white, $53.
Butter—Prints extras, 55c; cubes
extras, [email protected]; prime firsts, 51c. But
ter fat, Portland delivery, No. 1 sour
cream, 54c.
Cattle—Weak. Steers, best, $13®
13.50; good to choice, [email protected]; me
dium to good, [email protected]; fair to good,
[email protected]; common to fair. $8®9; good
to choice cows and heifers, $10®12;
medium to good, [email protected]; fair to me
dium,
bulls, $6 @8.50;
Stockers and feeders, $7® 10.
I Hogs—Lower. Prime mixed, $19.50
medium mixed, $19® 19.55;
[email protected];
$55.50;
prime lambs, [email protected]; fair I
'
'!
$3.50®4.50;
[email protected];
canners,
calves,
\ @20;
1 heavies,
Pigs,
; 0 , , _ . ,
Sheep—Steady. Spring lambs. $16®
| 16.50;
i t0 , me<,lum ' * 14 @ ir,; yearlings, $11® |
12 ; wethers, [email protected];
! 10r '°
MARKET AT SPOKANE.
. ■ ....
1 . , aay s4 ' . be 8ald tbat . lar ger
^
giving way to the Victory loin ram.
1 paign. However, there are increasing
operations along seasonable lines and
; increasing confidence in the essen
Hal stability of economic conditions,
country, May day strikes orj
,abor controversies have not been
j especially
4 rop P ros l>cc(s, particularly wheat,
«minuethe best in many years. In
^!l? eCt,0n both ' w \ nter and spring
wheat are. coming along line, mate
riaIly belped by light s)lowe ' rs thig
j week . Lumbering and mining oper
ations are ■steadily improving,
] n dry goods, cotton goods are firm
to strong following past declines;
! woolens and silks have made
reactive advances;
is In drugs, the general
movement of pharmaceuticals and
chemicals has inspired some conti- [
dence > n present levels and buying ;
J 8 "«proving. In iron and steel and :
lal 'I * are ' 1 bus,ness gradually en- 1
, B S alonK seasonable lines, but
tllR general situation, particularly in
heavy goods, is still unsettled.
, .
ln Krocerles amI P ro< l»*e there
haye bpen comparatively few changes,
advance8 belng ' nc , e d in Karo syrup
hogs, lard, cured meats, calfskins,
California grapefruit and flour, with
decline* in Bakers chofolate and
con, butter, eggs, lamb, strawberries,
$6.50® î
ewes,
numerous or serious.
some
business is good,
downward
eo
liotbouse lettuce, alfalfa and oats.
Provisions.
Butter—The seasonable slump
Hnues moderately, prices being off
another 2 cents to 58 cents for car
! tons ' :, 7 for prints and 58 for but
ferfat. Production is enlarging.
( beese—This market is still holding
ai comparatively high levels, with
only moderate demands. With in
creased output, there should soon be i
a lowering of quotations,
con
]
Eggs—Jobbing prices unchanged at
'5® 13.75, but price to the pro
. durer is down 30 cents to $12. This
js (iue to warmer weather, avriatlon
! In quality and necessity of candling
I receipts. There is a good in-storage
movement.
$i:
Poultry — Offerings
quato and market easy but un
changed since the declines on ehlek
gov-fens noted recently,
and turkeys nominal.
continue ado
Ducks, geese ]
Fresh Meats — Receipts at the
'Union stockyards for the week end
I eil April 30 were 449 cattle, 54
| exlves, 1659 hogs and 636 sheep.
Hogs have continued upward, 50 cents
a top price of $ 21 .
and sheep unchanged,
the dressed list, fresh veal is
ing on at 20 ®
slightly lower at 31 cents.
Lard and Cured Meats
patliy with continued
bogs, lard is up to .34® :;:
bams and bacon are l
higher, according t
: this week to
i Cattle
In
com
cents; lamb is
In sym
advances in
3 cents and
to 2 cents
description.
Hides and Wool
are a further advanct
a higher
ti wool, at 26®.35
for better qualities.
I he only changes
on calfskins
range up.
cents, to
to 40 cents and
ward (
provide
Fruits and Vegetables.
There is a sort of pause both In
tlie slumping
in tlie arrival of new stuffs.
off of old stuffs and
A cou
3
THE "BIG THREE'' HAVE DECIDED
TO HOLD A MEETING LAST
OF THIS MONTH.
GERMANY GETS PEACE TERMS
Council of Foreign Ministers Discuss
Revictualing of Baltic Provinces—
Chinese File Their Protest—
See Control by Japs.
Paris.—The council of three has
decided to summon the Austro-Hun
garian peace plenipotentiaries
meeting by the end of May, the
Paris newspapers assert.
The prefect of the department of
the Seine-et-Oiae and Colonel Henry
of the French war office have gone
to St. Germain to look over the sit
uation and to arrange for quarters.
Several hotels are available for the
Austrians,
which has been rebuilt for
museum, offers suitable conference
halls.
The actual negotiations with the
Austrian delegates will take place at
Versailles, to which place they will
be transported in motors, a drive of
about seven miles. The famous ter
race of St. Germain, overlooking the
Seine, will be used by the delegates
for exercise.
to a
while an old chateau,
use as a
Tlie date of the arrival of the Aus
trians has not been set.
The commission on Polish affairs
of the peace conference have under
consideration the southeastern fron
tiers of Poland.
The council of foreign ministers
are examining into the question of
revictualing the Baltic provinces and
Finland. The council also discussed
the procedure to be followed in
nection with the preliminary peace
treaty.
The presentation of the peace
terms to the Germans will not take
place before Wednesday. May 8.
In declaring its disappointment
with the decision of the council of
I three regarding Kiao Chau, the Chi
con
| nese delegation in a statement said
orj
In
Apples—The old deal is closing
[ strong. Local quotations are
; changed at [email protected] for fancy and $1.6.'>
: @2.25 for cooking, but holdings are
1 very light, and desirable offerings
readily command a premium.
in other Fruits - -,
is an to V' 1 mhei' f " rp a 5 rapefrult
. , U1 t0 , Çther fruits in
able supply and demand without
terial change in prices,
î the decision
gives Japan virtual
control of northern China.
Get $11,250,000 at Rally.
New York.—Breaking all records for
subscriptions received at Liberty loan
rallies an audience at the Hippodrome
Sunday night subscribed for $11,250,
000 worth of Victory loans.
"I once knew a man who went
hungry in order to buy feed for his
horse," said Jones.
"I can understand his sentiments,"
said Smith. Many's the time I have
cut down on meat and potatoes in
order to buy gasoline."
pie more weeks of warm weather,
though, will start the rush,
triliution is enlarging moderately.
Dis
Strawberries—Receipts still
come
from California, are somewhat better
both as to receipts and quality and
price has eased off 50 cents to $:t
per crate.
season
ma
Potatoes—Tlie
changed.
fornla come forward moderately, of
fering at cents. Old stocks gen
erally are unsettled and dragging,
locally unchanged at $ I @ 1 . 50 .
stock generally is
closing firm with new onions gradu
ally getting cheaper. Locally both
items are unchanged. Oregon onions
at $5 and green onions at 30 cents.
Other Vegetables — Hothouse let
tuce is lower at [email protected] Other
vegetables seasonable and unchanged.
'status quo" is un
New potatoes from Cali
Onions—Old
i
Grain. Flour and Feed.
\\ heat—While tlie April 1 holdings
bushels, were
] of wheat, 155,954,620
nearly four times as large as on the
same date last year, there has been
a heavy movement during April and
it is believed tlie forthcoming survey,
showing holdings as of May t, will
show
a big reduction.
There lias
been no change in the spot situa
tion.
Offerings are very scarce and
go at the 14-cent premium of March
cent added for each 10
15 with 1
days, over the
$2,09, $2.07,
four varieties.
government price of
$2.05 and $2.02 for the
Both generally and
locally the 1919 crop is coming along
most propitiously.
]
.
Flour
The
feature is the an
Barnes that the
nouncement by J.
grain corporation would cense buying
Ilour for export "because of profiteer
ing" by millers in prices of Ilour for
domestic consumption. It Is under
stood this order does
bids previously asked for.
the situation Inis been ami Is firm.
Higher prices paid for wheat com
pelled millers to
$1 1.6
nnt. rescind
I lowevcr,
raise prices to
and $11.10 for firsts and sec
onds and $ll.so for hard wheat va
rieties.
Feed Alfalfa is down $2 to $J1 and
ff $ 1 to $62 and $64. The
the grain corporation has
advances In corn; eaat
murkots have reacted downward
slightly; local quotations unchanged;
and on account of general scarcity
this deal Is sure to close strong.
oats
action of
checked III
are
(Til

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