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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, May 09, 1919, Image 4

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CLEARWATER REPUBLICAN
$1.50 Per Year In Advance.
»
Entered March 12, 1912, as sec
ond class mail matter In the post
jfflee at Orofino, Idaho, under the
Act ef Congress of March 3, 1879.
"The world has had a lull month 1
in which to discuss every feature 1 w
of the draft covenant then (Feb
ruary 14) submitted."
—- 7
"A FULL MONTH.
I
Thus Mr. Wilson, pretending sur- 1
prise because an impresion "seems i
to exist in some quarters that it tsito
the discussions of the Commission J
on the League of Nations that are
delaying the final formulation or
peace."
A full month, at the beginning
of which Mr. Wilson asked the Sen
ate Committee on Foreign Relat vas
to defer debate on the covenant un
til he had gone over it "article by
article," with the committee.
A full month, at the end of the
first ten days of which the President
made a sentimental speech in Boston
without clarifying a single line ot
the document which had puzzled
the American people since its text
Lad arrived by Cable. *
A full month, at the end of the |
.first fortnight of which Mr. Wilson
sat down at dinner with mem
bers of the Congress committees
which consider foreign relations,
and admitted that the covenant
would surrender points of American
Vovereignty and commit this Govern
ment to sending troops to wars in
which the Unite* States had no dl
to
a
of
rect concern.
A full month, at the end of eigh
teen days of which thirty-nine Sen
ators, from twenty-eight States that
contain two-thirds of tne country's
population, pledged themselves to
vote against the covenant in its
form at that Ume. Mr. Wilson, who
had declared on February 15 that
"there is a good and sufficient rea
son for the phraseology and sub
stance of each article," had not ut
tered a word to indicate" that he
would consent to any modification
of the draft.
A full month, in the course of
which Mr. Wilson repeated, in the
Metropolitan Opera House, the sub
stance of his Boston speech, but ad
ded nothing to explain the covenant
which all Americans then
upon
looked with mingled curiosity and
suspicion.
A full month, in which Mr. Wil
sons approved spokesman, Mr. Taft,
eventually decided that "the cove
nant needs revision," "its meaning
has to be dug out," "it should be
made more definite by a larger re
rervation of the Monroe Doctrine,"
etc., etc.
A full month, in which, thanks to
Lodge, Knox, Borah,' Hughes—and
even Taft and Lowell—calm Inspect
ion of the Wilson covenant con
firmed the early impression that,
whatever might be the virtues of a
league to end war, this Wilsonian
draft Utterly failed to nieel the
most important requirements,
not only would not prevent wars but
It would invite them,
benefiting America it would surren
der her ancient political treasures
and entangle her in a foreign web
of unknown size.
It has indeed been a full month
for the United States, and it has
been devoted to showing Mr. Wilson
that the "good and sufficient rea
sons" for each article of hts coven
ant are not good and sufficient for
the people in whom Mr. w tison
ought to be most deeply interested.
—-New York Sun.
It
instead of
!
j
!
May.—Muon criti-;
been directed against -
Wilson by members of J
Congress because of his reported
willingness at Versailles to pledge 1
the United States to an alliance j
with Great Britan and France to go ;
CRITICISE PRESIDENT.
Washington,
clsm .has
president
to the aid of the latter in any fu
lure war, in direct violation of the j
long established and traditional pol- '
Not only is this further departure |
in the direction of participation by j
this country in the affairs of Europe ,
considered unwise, but it ts regarded j
as an indication of lack «of faith by
the President himself in the cf
• ficiency of the proposed league of
nations in preventing future con
flicts. It is also thought to be a
confession that , as amended,
authority of the league over those
nations which have fought side by
side against
now subscribe to It
general as to make
more binding agreement
those States especially
stand together.
While this construction of
league as amended is not surprising
to the Senate, it is quite
that it will make more determined
Icy of Washington.
the
Germany and might
would be so
Imperative a
between
desiring to
1
the
certain
the intention of the opponents of
the covenant to at all hazards pro
American sovereignty and
rights, rather than barter them
away for any idealistic conception
which would not be able to with
tect
»
it
so
In
ed
continu <1
struggle of history,
bition to dominate the Pacific and
: control the trade of Eastern Asia,
in direct antithesis to the aims of
competitive
Japan's am
tl.i
siUMl
»
the United States, is tauen as an
evidence of this, as is also Eng
land s control of a fourth or the ter
ritory and population of the ^lobe
and her desire to dominate the com
1 nierec of the entire world in conflict
1 w ith the
states to excel all nations in com
purpose of the United
I menial development; not because
1 the aims of this country are selfish,
i but because it means to be second
tsito none,
J
|
The American-British-French pro
mise at Versailles the basis of a
desire on the part of many Demo
cratic Senators to conduct the treaty
debate in secret, in spite of the
President's oft-repeated declaration
in favor of "open covenants openly
arrived at." Republican Senators
are as certain that the sessions shall
be conducted in the open, so that
all the people may know and under
stand what is going on. They are
determined and they have the votes
to enforce it that this principle shall
not go the way of freedeom of the
seas and the self-determination of
small peoples.
EXPERIMENTING IN STATE SO
CIALISM.
For the welfare of U?£ U. &. it is
a good thing that the Non-Parti
san league shall try the State So
cialism experiment In North -Dakota.
There will be full trial of state
banking as custodian of puoilc fulfils
of $135,000,000, State flour mills,
coal mines and warehouses ru-fal
credits to build homes and 'buy
farms and the State controlled news
papers.
The managers of these various
North Dakota enterprises will be
political appointees, selected by a
governor who has nothing more vi
tal at stake than the possiole loss
of a temporary political office.
If these enterprises were privately
owned the managers would be se
lected by the various bodies of
stockholders, for whom the penalty
of making a wrong selection would
be bankruptcy.
In the past political machines
have not picked good business man
agers. When the manager is picked
by private stockholders he knows
that if he manages capably there
will beno question of his keeping
the job and that his rewards will be
in proportion to the results he gets.
When he is picked by the governor
he knows the next governor may
throw him out, that the legislature
is apt to interfere at any ume and
to any extent, and that he wil be
working for a rather niggardly pay
master.
It is a question of management.
Which scheme is more apt to get
good management?
scheme, or the private
scheme?
Last but not least this socialistic 1
scheme involves the substitution of
a
The political
ownership
j
Amerisanism -of
paternalism for
ficial control of the individual, for '
American initiative and enterprise.
—The Manufacturer.
It
j
UNUSUAL PROSPERITY
Boise, Idaho, May—Unusual pros- j
farmers of 1
perlty ts promised the
Idaho this year, and for that reason
the oficials in charge of the Victory
j
Loan have not hesitated to urge the
farming population of the state to;
be unusually liberal in the purchase j
! of bonds.
An unusual wheat crop is pro- |
mised and the price $2.2b a bushel j
insures large returns from that |
j source. Heavy crops of fruit, beets 1
and other produce will add to the j
! agricultural wealth of the State. j
"it is not only the K airiotic duty J
- of our farmers as well as all other
of J they offer a splendid investment.
classes of citizen- to invest as heav
1 Uy as possible in these Victory
j Bonds" said Chairman Gwinn. "but
go ; The outlook for the farmers in Idaho

is most assuring, but in some future
j years conditions may not be so sat
' isfactory as those prevailing at the
present time. It is the duty of fai
| mers, therefore, to take advantage
by j of the prevailing prosperity to lay
, aside something for a rainy day and
j there is no better means than
by through the purchase of these Vic
tory Bonds."
of
a
by
ta.
LOAN DRIVE DRAGGING
Boise, Idaho. May—Montie B.
Gwinn, Chairman of the Idaho Vic
toryLoan Committee said today that
the campaign continued to drag in
some parts of Idaho. He stated that
so if Idaho was to get the honor class
a it was necessary for the people of
j
this State to respond a bit more
to promptly and he expressed the be-1
1 lief they would do so and clean the
State quota up the early part of the
He said that there was no
veek.
question Idaho would meet its quö
lle was extremely anxious that
of the amount be raised before the end
of the campaign next Saturday. In
order that Idaho should Vie given the
credit for having lined up with
other States in going over the top
before the limit had expired.
»
GETTING DOWN TO EARTH.
We are apt to fly kites and try to
soar with them into the realms of
impractical theories. Occasionally
it is a good thing to get down to
earth and stay there long enough to
understand how marvelously we are
blessed without any of these new
fangled trimings of Utopia that are
so often dangled before our eyes.
In that position we can certainly
appreciate the following homely ob
servations of an Idaho Philosopher:
A digger for statistics has pro
duced a most interesting arttcle
showing that if a house were light
ed by kerosene as it is today with
electricity the coist would be start
lingly more than we pay for modern
lighting.
This does not include the labor
and annoyance of caring for ker
osene lamps and the cost of the coal
oil is figured in 10-year averages,
going back to he early days of the
oil lamp.
»When we touch a button and
flood the room with light we give
small thought to the marvel of it
hclehtifica'lly or to the great conven
ience of It domestically.
The telephone also suffers from
familiarity, but it is not only a
wonderful invention but a house
hold and commercial necessity.
Any number of doctors will testify
that if it had not been for the tele
phone they could not have arrived
in time to have saved life,
has happened innumerable times.
When we also consider social In
tercourse and business necessities
this instrument that is Instantly at
our command, at a cost so small
compared to its service as to render
it almost nothing we understand
something of the loss we would sus
tain without it.
The telephone, the electric cooker,
the electric sewing machine, and
sweeper, gas. and other compara
tively inexpensive conveniences of
modern life that administer to our
comforts, promote our happiness
and health and produce business ac
ivites that feed millions through
the continuation of payrolls argue
powerfully against all logic that
urges us to a backward step.
1
This
CLASSIFIEDFADS
For Sale by H. 0. Fhiilips.
Fifteen head of horses, weights
from 1100 to 1700 pounds. Ages 6
to 9 years. Will be sold very cheap.
Write or pnone.
Seated at Greer.
Right Kind of Shoe Repairing.
Just to let you know me right
j place to get the right kind of shoe
work done at the
right price, at
' 0sbol n . s shop opposite Post Office.
He knows how.
We are in the market for Ranch
j and Range Wools.
Phone us at our
Mark Means Co., Lewis
j expense.
of 1 ton Idaho.
5-9-4L
j AH kinds of stoves and furniture
at Bullock's Second Hand Store.
to; ■ _ , , _ .
j Coming. The Wild Cat of Pari».
|
j
|
1
j ideal cattle country inquire
j W. C. Harkness, Grangemon;. Ida
J ho. Phone 646.
FOR SALE—cheap, one second hand
car. Phone 483.
Mrs. I. M. Anderson.
If you wish a good home in an
of.

For Sale by E. T. Chapin Co.
Eight head of good farm horses.
Weight from 1400 to 1600 pounds.
Ages 7 to 10 years old. Located 3
miles ea.-t of Greer.
FOR SALE 7 5 head of sheep in
cluding weathers, ewes with lambs
and two fine rams. Also 9 head
shoats.
S. M. Craig, phone 9215.
Mr. Dairyman, who is the para
site in the dairy business, the com
pany that says oleomargarine is as
good as butter, or the one who
claims butter has no substitute?
MUTUAL CREAMERY COMPANY.
Lewiston. Idaho.
in
of *be various branches of the lumbering
Industry. Wages $3.75 and upward
for eight hours work.
Men Wanted.
The Potlatch Lumber Co., at Klk
j River, are badly in need of men for
be-1 '
Patronize Your Home Jeweler.
The watch maker tells us, if we in
tend to buy a watch, it is best to get
one made in America, on account of
american watches are
new
no
All
repairs.
standardized and thousands of
In
the
parts are made in the factories daily,
which will fit without further adjust
1 ment, while the repairs to a s^iss watch
top j have t0 be fjtted entaj | jn( , a| , extra
i charge.
F. I. Lindgren.
THE VICTORY TROPHY TRAIN.
Idaho, April.—There are
it
a
at
of
Boise,
around 500,000 people in the state
It is estimated that in
of Idaho.
the neighborhood of 400,000 of them
have visited the Victory Loan tro
niade a
phy special train that has
tour of the state in the interest ot
Chairman Gwinn,
the Victory Loan,
of the Idaho Committee, on his re
L urn to Boise stated that he was
positively amazed at the size of the
crowds that greeted the train at
every stopping point.
"People in the towns we visited
came out in a body and the farms
for miles around were left uninhab
ited while the families came to"sëê
he train, to look over the trophies
and to listen to the speakers and
singers. If there had ever been the
slightest doubt as to Idaho making
good on the fifth loan, it certainly
was dispelled by the interest dis
played by the people of Idaho in
this Victory Loan tour. X was not
at all surprised to learn that sec
tions we had visited had gone
over' the top within twenty-four
oôurs after the campaign opened.
"I have always been proud of Ida
ho and her people, but I must say
■ hat my feelings have been so in
tensified as a result of their interest
this Victory Loan that I find it
impossible to supply words to ex
press my gratification at the result.
"While the reports are not all In,
and while there is yet considerable
work to do, the initial response has
been most encouraging and the com
mittees in the various communities
1 feel sure will experience no diffi
culty In raising any remnants of
their quotas.
"Idaho is not a slacker, either in
war or in peace. The people of this
state do not believe in starting a
thing that they cannot finish.
They helped start Kaiser Bill down
the chute and they propose to do
their full share to pay the bill."
i
§
_
i
S
BUSINESS CARDS
DR. H. D. BRITAN
DENTIST
Office in the Burns Block.
Orofino, Idaho.
DR. E. W. HORSWILL
6
Physician & Surgeon
Office and Residence
Buescher residence
Orofino.
Idaho
F. ELLIOTT SMITH
at
A ttorney-at-Law
Orofino,
Idaho
our
NUF SED! GO TO THE
GARDNER HOUSE
.
Ida
to eat when in Weippe.
Mrs. Hazel Gardner, Prop.
HOTEL OROFINO
an
Rates $1.50 to $2.50.
Sanitary Kitchen. Clean Beds
American Plan. Quick Service
Outside Rooms. Sample Room
OUR MOTTO- "Lour»«. y to all Gurtlt"
3
N. 0. HiUeuin. I'roprielort.
Orofino, Idaoh.
in
WE HANDLE ONLY ONE KIND
OF GASOLINE
MOBILOILS FOR SALE
E. H. Atherton
as
who
Klk
for
$100 Regard, $100
«>* readers j>t inis paper win be
pleased to team that there Is at least
one dreaded disease that science has
been able to cure in all Its stages and
that is catarrh. Catarrh being greatly
Influenced by constitutional conditions
requires constitutional treatment. Hall's
Catarrh Medicine is taken Internally and
arts thru the Blood on the Mucous Sur
faces of the System thereby destroying
the foundation of the disease, giving the
patient strength by building up the con
stitution and assisting nature In doing its
work. The proprietors have so much
faith In the curative powers of Halt's
Catarrh Medicine that they offer One
Hundred Dollare for any ease that It falls
to cure. Send for list of testimonials.
Address F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo.
Ohio. Sold by all Druggist, 76c.
in
get
of
are
new
University Notes
University of
There will he a resumption of elec-,
Idaho.
Moscow.—
scholarship in
lions to the Rhodes
October, 1919, according to word re-1
ceived from Frank Ayt^lotte. Amer- »
ican secretary of the Rhodes trus- ;
tees.
:
The plan of selection will be con
The,
hitherto :
stderably altered. however,
qualifying examinations,
employed, have been abandoned, j
The general plan, as outlined in the
'etter, is as follows:
in
in
it
ex
In,
has
of
in
this
a
do
~r
OREGON NURSERY CO. STOCK
.
'
I have on hand Fruit Trees of all
varieties for fall planting.
CLARENCE LaFOREST, Agt.
P. O. BOX 154. ÖROFINO. IDAHO.
yuniiinHiuiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinitliiiiiinuiittiuiiiiumiiiiHin'
i Kamiah Marble and Granite Works
§
_ Manufacturer and Dealer in
Monumental and Cemetery Work
Best of Machinery
for Polishing,
Cutting and
Engraving
Prompt delivery to any part of the Clearwater country
I KARL C. FRANK, Prop.
miiuiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiMiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiï»
g
i
X
S Kamiah Granite
S and importer of all
I foreign granites
5 and marbles.
i
KAMIAH, IDAHO.
Dodge Brothers
Motor Car
(•
i
V
It has come to be known as a sub
stantial car, and naturally that has
attracted it to substantial people.
When a man comes in to buy, he is
thinking of the freedom from annoy
ance he will enjoy in its ownership.
It will pay you to visit us and
examine this car.
The gasoline consumption is un
usually low. The tire mileage is un
usually high.
Place your order now for future de
livery or you may be disappointed.
H. P. HANSON
OROFINO, IDAHO
MONEY
to LEND
6 1-2 i
Farm Loans
on
be
has
and
and
the
its
One
falls
Mix-Walrath [Realty Co.
Student- shall make (unnal appli
cation endorsed by the president of
the university.
Selection will be
governed by the same qualifications
namely:
Scholarship,
before.
character, interest in outdoor sports.
as
and instincts for leadership.
Committees will be appointed in
» 0RC h state with powers to appoint
; t he Rhodes scholars,
A list of the
: men to whom application may be
made* together with a formal appli
cation blank wtl be dispatched by
: Frank Aydelotte, American secretary
Massaehusetts
j to Rhodes trustees,
Institute of Technology, cantDridge,
Massachusetts.
~r

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