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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, October 15, 1920, Image 12

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1920-10-15/ed-1/seq-12/

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t
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\ t. i
, „ , , , * e T
.f the trade in the
% -
* f J
- U
.
55feti. 3a
The village Idacksinith shop under
tlie spremling clieslnul tree is for rent.
The smliliy lias gone to sea t
Borne new tricks
V. S. Navy schools-.
Blncksmitliing Is now a highly
specialized trade in iron working. Once
a I .an n so s It be is sure of a
good living for life, either In or out
of the service.
. A real Interest In one's work is as
necessary In the Navy schools as in
ethers, but Jack Is paid to learn and
Is sure of his Job as long as he wants
,, ......
U.p.ovidmg he is m earnest.
rbe above photo shows a couple of
anUls doing a big business at a Navy
Artificer School.
Gradually being
pushed to the rear by the progress of
The local evening
papers announce this fait and sa^
that tlie plan Is being discussed bv
the Administrai ion leaders. Ir ma'v
S-r.T-r »<
tins* leaders b In-ve, Kdinund H
Moore, who managed Governor Cox's
pre nvention campaign is given
credit for this rear attack on the
Harding niethod of using the
porch.
BACK PORCH CAMPAIGN TO
BE BEGUN SOON BY WILSON
Washington.
the canvass it is now announced that
President Wilson Is to wage a "Back
Porch'" campaign.
front
Largest Audience
Hears Gov. Davis
(Continued from first page)
thirty-five cents over the product of
alloÄ ÄnaÄ
al assistance' to farmers. One of the
problems confronting the state is to
assist tlie sheep men in the eradica-1
tion of scab, an object, which noj
farmer can accomplish single handed
lf done at all. this work must be
done bv the state
In reviewing the work done bv 1
the last legislature, the Governor :
cited a book just off the press under ï
the caption of "The Greatest Events !
in the Nation." This volume con-!
tains the statement that the 1918 '
ses ion of the Idaho state legislature
enacted the nio:?t progressive laws of
any legislature in the United States.
Th< commission form of government
has shown itself to be so excellent
are making a serious
It is owtng to this form
government that the legislature
of Idaho has been able to undertake
a program of such great progress.
Ex-Governor Hawley's history of ;
Idaho just off the press, declares
that the legislature of 1918 enacted
more important legislation than
ever been enacted in all the history
of the state. Notwithstanding the
attack-; made upon it by it: enemies.
Mk commission form of government
will stand approved of the people of
l! is only for imlilm I
anybody think« of
that nearly every western
making this year's state campaign on
the commission form of government.
The experiment with it in Idaho has
convinced leading statesmen in other
stales who
study of it.
state is
of
■ the slate,
propaganda that
attacking it at all
<.
Davis did not mince
•vo d> when he came to his review of
Ib'ii. eratir administra ii n. The
- al blunder of tlie Wilson
•ernor
. .
e-nploy
>f idle en
• mtion-wlde
thi: -mtim
i he war
is-.-d .
I' of mo:'.
million dol

where
Ir sc arc forty acres < n raining war
matcia! that i wa ling away. The
«ill not sell or at
11 ' W tilts ruai» l iai
on iMltti of raw material
were assembled in other section of Y
th • South, where the whole i- rap
a) decaying or corroding. Then
is absolutely no excuse for tlii« con
diGc, except wanton neglect of the
affan-c of the nation While the
great corporations are profiting by
'bi.« «aste, the masses of th> people
are bemg bled through the com*- ;
quer t high cost of living
Tht addles, of loveinoi Davïs has
received wide approval in Orofino
He sink. with deliberation and
proved his statements as he nroc. ed- "f
ed Hi language is notable for its ,
itte, lack of acrimony Every word
spoken was weighed with the rare or
a great statesman and keen thinker.
The Governor has shown himself a
grea executive, whose leaders!, p «
has inspired the masses of the state
the
first col
ad'.il»» trat i'
was tiie enactment of
the I'' dmvood tarif law,
duced th« t >rif on import« from other
countries This 1;
for the countries
where th- cost o
low t]•
which ro
w made it po.- ible
if Europe and Asia,
s much lie
Fr ited States, to Hood th«
American market, «ith cheaper pro
duct ; tbttr vve could produce Tlie
•suM «a« that many large munufac
'tiring e. t iliiisbmenls
doo ii.
■an laboring
Thi
ill
veiv
a three Million
r.ron out of
vast army
cicatcd p. condition of
Which :••'!,'-(I
■nt.
in,' ■:
■mtil tl
alone preented Dnoiiu
Governor Davi ;
people in the eudie
.'ers expose of th
democratic adrnin stration pui
au'oinobiles to th« va
than one and one-haif
ar- from one concern
ane year after the
signed. These
South, where
;b tiie open
and docav.
ar luck
nnit*.
y
stu tl* d
m a n y
is r*ar
v
>f th
V c
alone
fully '
armistice wa :
wer • hipped to the
thev
l
stored out
field, subject to rust v
There is oik t
administration
■ ïn
for still better
A more business
administration than his has
conceivable. It would
ire a calamity not to continue him in
with a ne* hope
things to come,
like
been is nm
;
office
i
The Inside of the
Nonoartisan League
iWHjjuiimaii 1/caguc
* VT^-fU n n 1, A i n
111 {North Dakota
nt ■ . ,j ..,
Ot tarn bill, the governor, if he sees
<au pres- into service all male
idem,-; between the ages of 18 and
T ! f L 11 " 1 Ca ^„, f °u C M thPni do , hi , s
the bidding This bill is another link
in the chain Townley has been bind
ing mound the farmers of the state.
It places unlimited powers in the
hand: °t the go»einor. Members of
lie minority called it another step
: in the reign of terrorism, aand de
I Pounced it is an undemocratic and
I un-American bill (all of which. It
surely is.)
J
(Continued from first page)
under n
rent. rtfs
highly
Once
a
out
as '
in
and _. . ,
wants " e, ?' 0n a,!i ° PaSS ' jd ppnlt, A v . e
measures in revenge upon the At
torney General, the Secretary of
of Stat and fh „ Sfate Auditor for op
Navy posing the league czars and their
reign of terrorism and Socialism.
These tlii ?e officials never have op
posed the industrial program of the
league but they object to Socialist
carpet-baggers controlling the state,
and they have made their fight on
being t,lis P°'nt The league leaders ad
of ! n| i"ed that when they refused to
accept Langer's challenge to do so.
; But they did punish them.
TIle y cut from the appropriations
sa^ ! , f ? r *£* attorne Y seneral *69.000.
bv « 01 ,!*'*' state auditor $4 8,000 and
ma'v I secretary of state $15 000.
»< i
H assistant attorneys general and gave
Cox's jit to the governor, and they cut his
given I staff of regular assistants from five
the j to tw-o.
that '
front | They changed ihe membership of
j the state board of equalization by
moving the state auditor and sub
! «Halting thp commissioner of insur
ance.
re
They changed the membership of
the auditing board, removing the
i state auditor nn*i secretary of state.
governor,, commis
treasurer and
I
and adding the
sioner of insurance,
iîiaiiU examiner.
! They changed the membership of
1 the emergency comniission, removing
! the
of
SKi^'T f
the I . • ,ook . ,,le pool-hall inspection
to , P ar,l , m; >i' from ' ,le attorney
a , . a " d i ,lai ' ed under the
noj a i, ' . .
L v l,,| » n of te, 'ro'' is to be fur
be 1 ,? r prossed - The legislature pro
' ided for an investigating committee
bv 1 ^ | ompi, '*e d of three ieague representa
: ;, es alld , twn *eague senators, to go
ï hrou J g ' l ! he s,a,e and 'nspect and
! eka,,lln ' bookf k papers and records
con-! °;. pr ' a,t ' 1 . nd,viduals; and of cor l )01 '
' "" ons suspected of saying something
:iRa J' ls ' " ,e sale of state bonds
of a ^ ain,< <: ^ ^ etate industries,
is ^iven authority to in
P ,l( ' s °' any individuals
c ° nt f rna so ^»«PPcteu. and to de
mand their books and records. They
(an take testimony and make recom
mendation;; to the governor.
ty-five thousand dollars was appro
prlated to carry on the work, and.
'' !ndel l 1 "', ,f ' ri !' s of t,1R b "l. this
'L depos ' ted 111 ltle ,)ank to
'hllrm!! of Senator J. I. CahilJ,
^e!l u , °T"" U . te f' who can
oheck „" out as he desires. This
of ; r P "J p j.j " S a . p ? ,itlca, l
ln X "v,",. n™ ' sT ^ 'V* ' I
''1 ' 1 and issue politi-1
of th.' state Wislatn * lutborit > ;
j a a , f
the J";'. 11 Probability, one of the most j
aad far reaching deals of)
ov illey leginie. was the pass-j
of ag ® lle f lin,1 »g Act. making it
I po f i , f î le to Rive Practically all State
of J'!"*"" PMhHcation of legal I
notices, etc. to the Townley Press,
forcing 50 independent papers to J
state auditor substituting the
gener
state
tr
The
on
has
is
Twen
of ', !
t-arly in the contest for political j
J' 0 ,. , North Dakota. Mr. Town
jet and his advisors were convinced j
liai the control of the avenues of j
Public»> was necessary. The es- 1
tahiishment of tlie
Leader, a weekly

... _ He F
^ inoriiinu daily published'^ FaVga I
. licHy. f"' iS^lro m^!u^!on U of
*be firand Fork« American and the I'
nip"'" ihllhoul, h |! nS I/ ^"Lv.pany
en p ' ' L rou ^Jj°. l,t the ,ate - These
0, f !ins ol P ubIi< ' ■»>' were found to bel
a ««'' 'Pilous drain upon the financesi
' 'irinization. and a scheme |
a pcriected whereby the state it
«o ik! not finanee them but
To liVnY chanKe on thp
ï.. t c„ Y ",» aS * ncor P° ra ted
. ï . ' Seme Bureau, capital
Y ,1 ÿl0 ' 00 1 °- 00 and incor Porated
l. ' ^ the L ? ague '
• , ' ... 1 ' newspaper printing
and publicity business, to buy and
newspaper«, and to deal in all
kind * uppl.es and act a.- in ad
'". ,tnd a "ws ag.-nev. This
C 'n'l ', the Sulding gen-,
' '•Buuton, has organized
;'f, bou'Uit newspapers in practically
Y.' un 'J in North Dakota.
, 1 '' r ' l 1 of organizing
b . f ,, t r pei iï OUKht to commend i>
Y 11 l,: Rl'FUS WALLINGFORD i is
*h- »rtcl-s of incorporation a;, 1
lly identical for al! of
1 ' Ul ; " ,d divide«- the stock into
ft T 'l COm '
y!«'» k s <>' the pur value of no
. ' , d to the Service ;
" 2"*'' n Promotion
; d .l' ,! » l'* 0 for spr ' I pl
Vhè ol-eled uSw i A ' Vnder ' d
• ' . . v r>ai va,UJ
' a " d s *« « ash 01 :i
! 'rate the practical
"f "> tj" . scheine, take a cor- the
, 1 m t.inltali/.'d at $ 1 1,000.on,.
' "" '»'«res of common I
* »00« -hares or preferred this
| k f'i" dividends on the com it
»t« < k a,e preferred „nd cumu
« annually must be
P*»« «1»*' preferred stock before -
of
ro
»,
on partisan I
publication, fol -1
This afterwards became the I
Leader.
lie
lowed
National
then
Nonpartisan
y If
y
\V(
v id*
'
:
l sei!
v *
; the common stock shares in the net
earnings. After the preferred stock
has has been paid 70c. then before it ca
share in any further earnings, the
in common stock which cost the Bureau
probably one speech, and a few dol
lars car fare and hotel hill Is en
titled to 7 0r a share. In addition.
I the stock salesman receives $1,000
in cash for selling the common stock
° n " ' vould ur,;vvi " this method of
j organization was the consummation!
i n Of all all, but not so there are yet
greater heights to which Mr. Brin
ton and the "inner circle" can climb
Each share of the $2.oo gtft s tock
has one vote, but only each share
sees j holder who put , up hi> acUla , mon -
male ( v fo] . stoc jj p aH a vo t e \ nian 0 wn ;
and fi f tv
hi , s solitary vote which is matched by
link the vote attached to a *•> share
of stock sivun t „ the "Bureau." This
, niethod of organization •usures the
the contro , of all League newspapers by
of the Bureau, which in turn Is con
step : trolled by the "inner circle" of the
de- t, eaf;U( , which is controlled absolute
and
It
A v . e
At
of
op
their
op
the
on
ad
to
and
000.
gave
his
five
shares,
$500.00, ,<ets but a
ly by Mr. Townley.
These "League newspapers" no*
only are overcapitalized and forcei
*n divide any earnings they rnighj
make with the Bureau and bled for
organization fees, but they must
look to it for news sei vice, which
of course,included editorial matter.
Tim result is that Mr. Townley- dic
tates the policies of his state week
lies. his two state dailies and fifty
odd country weeklies. The same
propaganda appears simultaneously
and the same editorials grace each
sheet. He maintains s bureau of
three experienced newspaper men at
the Capitol and no experrse is spared
in securing team work on the part
of these publications in putting over
the various Townley schemes.
Mr. Townley found these news
papers an expensive luxury. Busi
ness men were not eager to patron
ize them and attorneys and others
did not come forward with sufficient
alacrity w ith their official publica
tions, so the famous "Newspaper
Act was conceived. This act pro
vides that the people of the county
shall, at each general election, select
an official newspaper—pending the
first election, a printing commission |
"•as established, consisting of three j
officials, to select the
for the different counties
the first election.
of
sub
re
newspapers
pending
of
the
and
Hi? then provid
ed tnat all official proceedings of the i
state and its political subdivisions, j
together with all legal notices shall j
lie published in these newspapers. |
In addition to selecting the official I
newspapers, the printing commission
controls all the state printing. It
lets such contracts without bids—it
opens the portals of the treasury of
the state to the "Bureau'
of
go
'
in
workers are making from
$306 per month" ,
It is being planned to push th
to work into other states at once, at
cording to those who profess to know
«»roething of the plans of the "man
higher up."
l The work is beine' done under the
' I " arae of the Consumers United Store*
Cnmnanv mromoi-ated with a capital
> ; stork of $10.000 only $1000 of
which is renmred to be paid in un
j dev the Articles of Ineomoration
of) The incorporators are Howard ' L.
Elliott, who was recently appointed
it by Townley as state manager of the
Townley league in North Dakota and
I who was a defeated candidate on the
Socialist ticket for mayor of the City
to J of Minot, N. I).. C. H. Heck, former
__
newspapers.
Farmers of North Dakota have
noured Oil" Million Dollars into an-j
other Townleyesque scheme, probably,
one of the most remarkable plans to ;
get the money that has ever been j
! '"ii \ », ». ■
„ 11 ,lah . been such a huge success in !
promotion that the organizers who j
have heretofore been devoting their
entire time to securing memberships!
in the Townley league are now j
working like beavers on the newest
proposition which returns such fine I
commissions with such great ease, j
.. the >' CP, » e in bunches. ,
Lrtbers in o"ne er day. S a e t CU $ r 5
Hion on each one, and nearly all the'
?200 to
the
and its
tr
'Why.
com m 18 -
! !>' a worker in the coal mines of
j Washburn, N. D.. and who was well
known as an agitator on Socialistic
j lines there, and Norbert O'Learv.
j confidential secretary to A C Town
1 ley. - ' °" n
Townley
, , , ,, we 1 ln tbe "flax
F da,h of tlle league autocrat,
I B^^U^airo'daTm J t b" 0 thT"^
^ Sl repreSentatlve " Mr Town
I' The Consumers United Stores Com
^"Lv.pany Is merely a promotion enter- j
prise for a chain of "farmers'stores"
which it is expected to establi«b in !
every town of any size and at least
| on store in each county in the state
On January 1. 1917 three stores
were in operation—at Minot, Ken
ma J[ p and Crosby.
There had been organized 30 of
stores, throughout the northwester
section of the state mostly each
' ha '' mR a n» p «nbership of 200 to 300
and one store having 541 members
The average is 320 mem«,"™ The
total memberships at that date was
approximately 9.600.
To become a member it is neee.s
sarv to be also a paid-up member of Of
the Townley league.
PAYS $100 FOR PRIVREGE OF an
SPENDING HIS PAW
The farmer pays NlOO for hi« !
membership, apd for that $100 he
i is granted th(*i» r ivilege of trading in
1 the store or trading in
He doe - not get a share in the I
store or in th« fonsumers United
S,ores ,:o,,,pan > He has absolutely
no returns for his $ioo except the
; privilege of buying at the store, est
where he is promised goods at cost,
I pl " ' tbp fr ' d « bt aad a profit of 10
per cenf ' The agreement does not
î«*'ify "hat lines or now extensive of
:i stock shall be carried
It has been reported that one of
the largest mail order nouses of the
country Is working with the Con- on
I sumers United Store Company, but
this has not been varifled Certainly
it F a scheme that would appeal to
such a concern.
Will, 30 stores organized al an
average of 320 members the total
J W.
Brinton,
formerly of
I Bcuch, N. D., wh(?r6 hp bpcâinp cIofc
-1 ly associated w
I whom lie knew
ith A. C.
who
United
the
such
deem
the
sucli
amone
not
any
be 9,600 members at $100
net oul.i , l
each or a grand total of 1
; t tiie rate at which memberships
the were being written it is lik. .y t îat
the total is well ove r 10 . 000 . wiili a
dol- total of On Million Doll.-i. -uu
en- scribed by th .
What becomes of 'he $100 paid in
bv the farmer member?
The question can be answered in
part by a
agreement which the farmer member
The
n-,
'
end of January.
of
, . tinn
yet I B,Kn * wb ? n he pay«_ th* * 100
1 con,ract ' ;l! ' ° ''"' s
i AGEEF MENT TfiT? BUYERS CER
; TTETrATE TN THE CONSUMERS
UMTFD STORES CO.
- |
;
by
the
by
the
reading of the contract or
At
We the undersia-ned for the pur- .
pose, .- P J forth heFein do each sub- l«rs
scribe One Hundred Dollars, to be every
paid in cash or note, to the Consum- far
<-r- t'nited Stores Companv of North
Dakota, a corporation lo be formed, when
o », • „„j the
ntrresd 1 thit the 'purpÄ fSr which | 'nK
v\-"e pay the said sum of One Hundred | ers
Dollars arc That ninety per cent of ;
all money subscribed herein, shall be
used by said company to establish
.until the
Thousand Dollars,
in cash or notes, shall be so applied
All surplus subscribed over the said
Thousand Dollars may
be used by the company either to es
tablish and maintain a central buy
agency or wholesale establish
ment. or to carry on educational
work or propaganda along all lines j
deemed by the board of directors of !
the Consumers United stores Com- j
nany to be in the interest of or b. no- j
ficial to farmers, and for the assist
ance of farmers' organizations such
as relate to the economic, education
al or political interests of the farm-!
ers or both
a
no*
a store at
sum of . . .
for
sum of
dic
of
at
i and will immediately thereafter issue 1
1 a certificate to each subscriber here
! to granting hint the l ight to pur
cha -e goods and merchandise at said
store, or any other store the said
companv mav establish, and to order
the the same thoough the company's
| stores, bv paying tlie wholesale màr
j ket price together with the freight
ing
3 - The Consumers United Stores
Company agrees to >_ tasli-.h the '
store at .not later titan,
the first dav of . .
. . . . 19 . . .
charges, pins a margin or not to ex
eeed ten per cent.
4 . The Consumers JJnited Stores
the i Companv reserves the right to cancel
j any certificate or certificates in;on
j the pavfnent to the subscriber, here'll
| of their subscription rees, less ten
I dollars for each year for which ser
vice has been rendered
It
of
, tures
NOW «ITT VHJA'v TT att mt. .
Put the a re^menT d(££ nof^î?
swer all of th- yu-stion 'AVhat be'!
comes of the *100 paid in bv thé
farmer'" by the I
When the blank space« are mied !
in it is said that the agreement reads
that "ninety per cent of «H mon ev
subscribed herein shall be used bv
company to establi-h a store at
...until the "urn of t
Thousand Holla-- in rash ftP
shall be so applied All * .ml p'
scribed over the „I t 1 ®
1.' ' th - SU £* of Ten Thous
Com.DaPv" (T^COTsumers b r
g^LJin, A United.
Pc ' ' and not the Ht °ro at 11
The Com
pany further agrees that in the
event it shall discontinue the opera
tion of its store at . .
in ten years alter it shall have be
gun business, it shall redeem al! cer
tificates at the rate of ten dollars
an-j for each year le
said store was so operated and if!
to ; the assets of such store are not suf-1
j ficient to redeem all such certifi-1
' a, ' in Ulli, then the whole amount!
in ! of the assets of such store shall be !
j divided prorata among its subscrib
{ero.
j |j on l t
ers and consumers of this nation ini
I educating th mselves to efficient co-,
j operative buying and selling and to
, "st i- making democracy a real
in our political and economic
and
. . . . with- :
its
than ten that the
f
» 'p numose of this subscrip
•'id ar.d assist the produc
ife.
-
Subscribed and signed on the day
written above our signa
vear
I
).
But the real point is that
the stores are presumed to be
ized until there shall have been
memberships sold. So that
would at one be a clear, clean
plus of Ten Thousand Dollars ati
least to be used by "the Company" ■
in the manner prescribed by the I
agreement, which would be in any ■
manner the directors of the r™ ll
dHraÄ îeÂTr.T
It is a very broad agreew ' '
er's $100 "goes""^* "Vhe° f C^ farm -
j while$40 of the other half goes" to
the establishment of thU ♦
! .„a l" re at
goes—pr*sumably to promotion $ «f
which th« organizer sal »'? °ï'
remaining «5 to nïhîr T d .. the
expense. Kanization I
The organizers receive 5
of each $100 membrshin and „„„
their own expenses n»» ®" d , P y
wak paidMl in a
weeks and many of the organizers
have be n "taUne Hr.,,«- t ant
$90 per d av ° m $5 °
The stores adreadv oreinlzcd w
an average membershin or 3on ,
mers paying *3'> 000 Inr / ar "
Of this $9.000 goes into each storo
and *23 000 from ' , stbre
an >' Purpose the directors «7
United Stores J ,
! WHY WORF WTTrivr TT 1 Pnmrrc m
^ iTAev* ^ COMES SO
But a great nmnv V»f
Buiagreat ma iy « ,r th.e member
I notes are used xh rnuJi i' T bese
good investment in »17 ra , and ar<>
the Consumers Un ted StoreldirecV
ora for they carry 8 per cent Intel
est from date of issSt nln attor
how long ft is before the store Is in
operation. One statement ha7 bee"
made that approxlmaw.y one fourth
of the memberships are paid in rash
which with a membenhlD of in nnn
would give a TemÄlp of ?1on
who are paving S per cent utero«
on *750.000 or an Income of *60
000 and all the promoters have lii
v.sted is a lot of "blue skv "
The farmers do not even select the
managers of the stores their
create,
none of
organ
200
there
sur
per cent
the
fur
money
"Tile man above selects the
managers of the stores" Bald the
one
who was explaining the Consumers
United Stores company scheme.
'there b still one more interest
paragraph in the "agreemen "
reproduced above, '' hat is paragrap .
herein it provides that in case j
the store at ..shal'
discontinue operation if the assets of
such Store a ' f ' n°' sufficient to te I
deem the certificates in full "then i
the whole amount of the assets of
sucli store shall he divided Dro-rata
amone its subsenbers. I
This meins of course that the Con ]
sumers United Stores company does
not contribute to the liquidation of
any of the stores that may prove
failures.
l
îat
a
.
in
in
n-,
'
or
. The surplus of Teu Thousand DoF
l«rs or more a not available and
be every store is left to its own fate so
far as "the Company is concerned.
How clever paiagraph 5 reads
when you look it over again. Plainly
„„j the tanner is told that he is not pay
| 'nK hi« money to establish a farm
| ers stole but "The purpose of this
of ; subscription (the farmer's $100) is
be
j
!
j
j
1
REX BEACH'S
[Samuel Goldwyn
and Bex Beach
pres en t
famo us storv
<^~Tke
I
V».
ïfiDTC
Un
it!
ßirecred by
rrank Lioyd
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F
i V
ar
Ma .
IJi I
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71
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44
We'll Fight!"
They had thrown down the gauntlet
the challenge of the Wall Street Octopus.
I here were three of them—two men and
a woman—strong, masterful, imbued.with the
raw elemental courage and strength that is the
heritage of those who have lived, loved and
fought in the grim, bleak wastes of the Alaskan
snow country.
\Y all Street had vowed to break them— to
trick them out of a vast fortune that was right
fully theirs. All the cunning; all the trickery;
all the money at Wall Street's command was
thrown into one mighty effort to crush the
valiant children of the
to

I

ll
snows.
It was the cunning of Wall Street against
the Might of the North.
And the fight that followed resounded
with the clash of mighty fists; vibrated with the
unleashed passions of strong men fighting for
fortune and the love of a
woman.
Fights? Action? Thrills? Well, Rex Beach
wrote it and it is one of his most
stories. It's red-blooded,
straight-from-the-shoulder romance and you'll
want to see it.
powerful
He-man, two-fisted,
44
REX THEATRE
Thursday-Friday-Saturday
October 21, 22 and 23
Also PATHE WEEKLY
Ad. ?5c and 50c
»
to aid and .«ist tu 's
consumers of th'
i,, e themselves to efc 0 " ***
five buvinp al roir f:cle »t
. j n ma kinp- dlllj * ^
j 0U r uolitica « m CV a «*5?
The farmer
nation in coop r -u ! v! i for WSf
I ling and assists to , knj J
i ley brand
U real factor in <, Ur .. .. Det noc r î
How very kina of .l*h7
I United Stores r . llI)a j"* Consul
] At a stormy a i;.: '
'he Grand Pacific .
Vonday. January >J , .
hoard of director- n r !t
Un J on ot North Dakota and *
and several of ; r .,?" d
Governor Frazier 11IV "°, w * r ». *i_
portion of the - . n n ' durit"
neatedly refused to give I« nle ^
ation of what is done with y «. np1 ^
"surplus" and ir anarv H
Pliar.ized in true TrovJeve™ **' '»■
ner. informed the far-fer^ tv" 11 *
was "none of your busing".** 1 « «
WEEK)
.„ 8e ^i°il j
Biais
ween
H
Far
(CONTINUED NEXi

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