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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, October 29, 1920, Image 1

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Clearwater Re it blican
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CLEARWATER
COUNTY
VOLUME IX NUMBER 31
0R0F1N0, CLEARWATER COUNTY, IDAHO
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1921).
à " f , nationÿ I "ant the
st
[ Sammis on
c
[ (J. Sammis on
eague of Nations
,yS pact will not be signed
until IT'S CONSTRUCT
TION IS UNDERS T 00D
j U. Sammis of Iowa, ad
„ audience at He Rex }
rjÄ-Ä
lint of view. Mr. Sammis is dis
nctively argumentative in his
.(•öd and drives home his conclu
forcible manner.
Hon
.
He
in a
at the beginning of his
^ch that it would be of the old
diioned kind, which the audience
lieved at the conclusion of his ad
, e3S Mr. Saminis comes from
oux City, Iowa, where he has a
(v practice. He was a collector
Internal revenue under Roosevelt
id served four years in the state
nate in Iowa. In 1908-1910 he
rved as grand exalted ruler ot
,e Elks of the United States. He
as introduced by F. E. Smith,
junty attorney, candidate for re
lection, and his address in part
ons
ted
Hows:
"I have come a long way from
ma, where there are few demo
I have enjoyed my visit to
a ho and like its wonderful possi
bles contained in its latent re
al tees.
; ot4 or two concerning the candi
de? of the two great parties.
a
[ 'Governor Cox has not shown in
ty judgment, in his manner of con
ucting the campaign, that degree !
f dignity and statesmanship that
I wish first to speak a
. , . ,, ,
light to characterize a candidate
>r president of the United States. !
[is campaign has been one of vitu
eration. of abuse, and lacks defini
ion of all the great issues of the
lay excepting the league of nations,
le charged the republicans with
luilding up a great slush fund to
orrupt the voters and his charges !
rere soon proven false.
He com
lained of the unfairness of the
ress, especially in the west, which
ot him nowhere. He even charged
lie supporters of Harding as being
eactionaries.
"On the other hand Harding has
onducted a campaign free from
uch objectionable elements. He
las been dignified and statesman I
*e cannot agree as to Its meaning,
She wanted no
thing but the others wanted some
thiiiR and they got something. Eng
land got part of Africa, France got
Part of Africa, Italy got part of
Europe and Japan got part of China
and China was our ally. Then
they demanded a guarantee of the
possession of these new acquisitions.
(Here the speaker referred to arti- L
c| e ten and eleven to prove
Mnt.) The president came back
»„I —I..* . -
ike.
, "Our democratic friends have
pVed to make us believe that there
B but one real issue, that of the
»venant of the league of nations.
Sut there are other issues just as
veil that come closer to the Ameri
an people. I wish to discuss these
rom the standpoint of an American
itizen. The treaty Is a contract
«tween the parties who sign it, but
or as to the interpretation of its
contents.
The democrats think it
means one thing and the republi
cans think it means another,
shall not sign it until we do under
stand it.
in Paris and
known was the fact it had to be
submitted to the senate for ratifica
tion. At Paris America was a dis
interested nation.
We
All was done in secret
because it became
Point.) The president came back
and asked us to sign this.
I want to tell you the republican
party is not opposed to a league of,
nations but It is opposed to a Wll
son league ol nations When the I
Neue came upon the flooTÎÎr îhe j
senate for discussion and the four
wen Lodge reservations were voted
Four "voted
Thirty
[or either all or part of thé réserva
u Pon there were forty-six demo
crats in that body,
ägalnst the reservations.
*°ven of them voted
Thirty
on an averagi
•ms Senator Nugent of Idaho,
voted for eleven of the Dodge ...
«Hons, hut has changed In this
;P ect „ aK is now subscribing to
ne Cox standard and the demor
ra 0 national platform, which fa
ors the Wllnon league of nations.
« the president brought It hack
from Poris."
rcser
re
In
conclusion Mr. Sammis rc
the tariff question and the
JUrnvagant expenditures during the
«f with which the people are all
•" familiar. Rgardlng the tariff
wr Sammis stated that Senator Nu
R'n 1ms telegraphed Washington D.
r» 'I, lav< ' an embargo put upon
■anadlan wheat. But this embargo
f„i only a temporary af
»*' and that
Nugent will continue
yupport the democratic free trade
p '»'y which has always been one
tiie outstanding principles of the
to
party. He asked the
in» , to ,ook ttt Nve situation for
fnemselves.
saying:
»nt you are satisfied, for heaven.s
•ihn V< .' ,P democratic ticket and
Z U ' *»y the results.
th. 0 « 0 /, mov l*tK the government of
l„"Ited States away from Wash
Rt°"i n ' c 1 am f° r America
»t. last and all the time. I am
In favor of sotting up a super
the 'V T/ nt and having the flag of
ernn! n l ,ed SuteB and a " other gov
»ments hang beneath the flag of
"If
I am not In
fir
à " f , nationÿ I "ant the
otl.pr n st , rlpes t0 fl > above all
othei flags in the world as it ha
always done in the past i am
m favor of ailegiance to any"C
flag than our own. j U s, vote for
;,ou' own interests as you see them
ome down out of the clouds and
think for yourselves, and if vou do
c rat ic °Danv* 1 ' Ï°V think th,: dem 0 :
be nnw'.H a, ' d lts candidates will
be snowed under so far that they
Hon " eVer "* lhe 1,Bht of «e-nrrec
.A ^ rr !'\- democratic s
} h 1
"-***«
tat»- cen
supporting
league ticket in
. county. Where there
is a vacancy on the \ P u.-.JA
Crow is supporting a democrat. In
the event of the election of either
E™ an , d Blake "-'lid control the
state patronage in Clearwater coun
y. When are the democrats
ing to wake up?
tli"
ter
in
a
ot
Bo
Gov. Davis Gives
Facts About State
CORRECTS MISINFORMATION OF
OPPONENTS REGARDING CAB
INET GOVERNMENT
to
There has been much misinforma
tion circulated about the
form of
Cabinet
government and its effect
upon taxation. I want to give
a few of the facts of record thaïe
in may be found in the State House by
anyone who takes the trouble to in
! vestigate.
a
you
, The Cabinet form of government
has not increased State taxes It
! has reduced them. It has cut $800 -
000 from our State taxes this year
By better efficiency it has saved
money and increased revenues at the
same time. It will do for Idaho
what it has done for Illinois
to duced taxes every year,
!
—re
The Cabinet system is running
appropriations made for the old
on
sys
tem. The amounts to be appropriat
ed were determined by the Legisla
ture according to the needs of each
department, institution or industry,
without reference to any particular
form of government. The $25,000
appropriation for tubercular cattle
w as not given to the Department of
I Agriculture because of the Cabinet
system, but because the Legislature
believed that the owners of cattle
destroyed in the State should be
compensated. All appropriations
were considered upon their merits.
The Cabinet form of government
neither Increased nor decreased the
appropriation for any department.
What It has done has been to en
able every department to make a
record of service and economy that
has not been eualled in the history
of the State.
The Department of Agriculture
has done a great work in standard
izing wheat, hay, potatoes and fruit,
and In enforcing the standards
adopted This has opened the mar
kets of the country to the farmer
and his products are now sold on
grades established at home. The
farmer is now paid when his car
no- leaves the shipping station. Former
ly he was not paid until his car ar
rived at destination and the grades
got made there often robbed him of the
of fruits of his labor.
The Department of Commerce and
Industry has increased receipts 64.9
the Per cent, while operating expenses
have increased only 2.65 per cent.
L The Department of finance and
hts'Budget has saved many times Its
cost to the State by the inauguration
of a uniform system of bookkeep
ing. When the Legislature meets
it will have before it a budget
as
it
its
it
be
of, . . ,
showing the cost and needs of every
the I department, which is something our
îhe j Legislature has never had. and will
be of Immense benefit in cutting
out unnecessary ifpprnpratons
The Department of Daw Enforce
ment will turn hack one-half of its
appropriation. It has already brought
*nto the treasury more money than
'• has 0O!,t ,h, ' ' S,atp : „ ... ,
The Department of Public Invest
ments has reduced delinquent loans
from half a
seventy-five thousand dollars,
earnings on lonns and investments
have been Increased more than a
quarter of a million dollars n year
Since April 1. 1919. loans and In
vestments have been increased from
»9,938,000 to $13,690,000
The State Land Department add
much to the
endowment funds the first
of the Cabinet form of govern
Earn
iiigs from this increase were $141.
383 as compared to $8.642 for 1918.
These earnings were more than four
times the total cost of the depart
mnt for the year.
The Bureau of highways has done
88 per cent of all the work done
since the department was organized
In 1913. It has reduced the cost of
preliminary engineering on Federal
Aid projects from 4.8 per cpnt to
cent and secured Federal
three hundred miles of
highways as against one hundred
miles before that time.
The Department, of Reclamation
has settled every Carey Act trouble
that was
I
1
to
fa
dollnrs to
and
million
re
rc
the
the
all
Nu
D.
af
od sixteen times as
State's
year
nient ns was added In 1918 .
one
the
the
for
and
of
-- . . ,. nnrH
am that was before the ° ,d ' and boapd ;
super and for more than a year no new
of matter has been before tht board
gov- for a longer period than two weeks
of (Continued on last page)
2.7 per
Aid for
In
'State Finances in Good
Shape Report Shows
Idaho is not Broke—Surplus Increased 166 Per
During the Present Biennium According
Official Facts. Read It For Yourself
Cent
to
Governor I). w.
Davis
Tuesday a report from the
sioner
received
Commis
shows that 1
1920, there was $ 1.
in banks, from all
At the -same time in 1918
there was $497.593.54 in banks,
cording to the report. "The current
surplus has been increased during
tli" present biennium more than 16G
per cent, from $211,414.41 to 562,
495.49," says Mr. Banks in his let
ter to the governor.
Total assets as shown by the
port are $5,549.896.47.
liabilities $4.987,400.98
missioner's
lows:
of Finance, hielt
in October 16,
334.772.Og cash
funds
ae
re
and total
The Com
statem nt in full fol
ASSETS
Cash, general fund.. $
Cash, highway fund..
Treas note redemption
fund, general .
22,036.18
250,983.31
664.625.00
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
Taxes, general fund .. $1.726.383.54
Taxes, highway fund. 937.460.98
Due from Federal Gov
ernment, counties,
highway districts . . 978,537.73
Due from Federal Gov
ernment, counties,
highway districts,
for work for next
t ee months .
Due from Federal Gov
ernment for Morril.
Adams, Hatch and
Smith-Lever funds. 51,658.15
Revenue from depart
ments for October,
ments for Oct. Nov.
and Dec.
750.000.00
168.211.58
Total assets ....$5,549,896.47
LIABILITIES
Warrants payable Oct.
16., 1920 .
Treas. notes, highway
$1,662,400.98
of
a
The Same Old Pill With a
Pretty, New, Pink Coating
The farmers of Clearwater coun
ty know the story of the Blake
gang influence. The democrats and
republicans kicked this same gang
out of their party politics because
it as a grafting gang. Remember
the $66,000 Nease-Cruise? Remem
ber the Swinton deal? Remember
the mismanagement of the Orofino
Highway District? The tampering of
the assessor's records? This outfit
has never stood for the rights of
the people against the
kind of political corruption.
Blake-Crow gang is at the head of
the Non-Partisan league in Clear
water county. They control the or
ganization in this county and direct
its policies and the farmers advance
the money. Their method of cam
paign, as put forth in the Orofino
Tribune, the gang organ, is enough
to convince any sane person that
this is true. They do not give a
care for any party, not even
Non-partisan league, excepting for
rottenest
The
the
Mr. Voter! Read This!
Are the men and Women who
have lived here and built up this
state capable of continuing its de
velopment? There is nothing per
feci and there cannot be anything
perfect, but there can always be an
effort along constructive lines which
assures a constant and healthy
growth That is the way in which
Idaho lias reached Its present state
of development. There are no prob
loms unsettled but that can he set
tied by Idahoans themselves, the
people who made Idaho. But today
and for several years past our state
lias been seething with discontent
made possible by an organized
group of agitators who silently
move about the country feeding the
Deoitle upon abuse of their fellow
men They have a smooth line of
I „ronaganda for every class of people
1 and silently array neighbor against
neighbor Ever since the world be
■an there have been propagandists
«reaching (tie doctrine of dlscon
tent wherever they could find a fer
111' field to plant their seed.
This propaganda Is brought tous
I - men from without our state, by
)y n ithtn our state who these
mea * ^ e con verted to their
agiuiiors and men wbo
way o .j ' onnoaed ail devel
have co today They see
° P thi good in our present systems
nothing g ^ j ar as ' to ron demn
and e j " j; f u [ administration of
the ost sue c pver ba d. We
governmen s ]owly to reach the
have „ ent wc have today ;
th e men would tear down
and night what it has taken years!
rebuild It requires courage and
;
stage
1 Treas
fund
500,000.00
notes, general
fund
Estimated
general
three months . . .
Estimated
warrant issue,
three months, based
on highway program
and contracts let... 1,600,000.00
650.000.00
warrant is
fund next
600.000.00
highway
next
Total liabilities. $4,987,400.98
Current surplus, this
statement .
Surplus. Jan. 1, 1919
Cash in hanks, all funds
Oct. 16. 1920 . 1.334.772.06
Cash in hanks, all funds
Oct. 16, 1918 .
The following letter
Banks was received by Governor D.
W. Davis, Tuesday:
"Dear Governor:
"In the course of our budget
work we bad occasion to determine
the present, financial condition of
the state, and found the result so
pleasing that we are submitting
herewith a copy of the statement
for your information.
"The current surplus has been
increased during the present bien
nium over 166 per cent—from$211,
414.41 to $562,495.49.
"We would like to be the first to
congratulate you on this evidence
of efficiency. To have thus in
creased the surplus of this state in
the face of general increased costs
will prove very gratifying to your
friends and constituents.
"Very sincerely yours,
"DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE.
"D. F. BANKS.
Acting Commissioner.
562.495.49
211.414.41
497,593.54
from Mr.
a
what personal gain they can get
from It.
This is the same old pill with a
pretty pink, new coating they are
asking the people of Clearwater
county to take, deceiving them Into
the belief that the results wl|J be
different. This same old gang is
out working tooth and toe-nail for
the election of the Non-Partisan
league ticket. Why shouldn't they?
They maintained It and under the
guise of a bénéficient farmers move
ment they are getting the farmers of
this county to advance the money
to support it. Not only that, but
they are actually Instructing the
farmers of this county how to vote
In order to elect it. The only re
commendation some of these candi
dates have, all they c an possibly
have, is that they are with the farm
er movement, so-called. Are the
people of Clearwater eounty going
to take this pill?
knowledge to criticise constructively.
^ny i o can 00,11 P » 1 n a °° totere I
conditions and be unable to ere
ate anything better and be unable
to appreciate anything better if he
had the opportunity.
It is surprising to learn that some
of our people who have nelped build
up Idaho, who have made it what it
is today, are actually paying out
siders to bring them this propagan
da of discontent. This can well be
said of the non-partisan league,
They have hired, with the money of
Idaho people, radical organizers and
editors from outside states to come
here for the sole purpose of tearing
our government to pieces as it Is
administered today. It seems to be
of their business to do this. They have
no interests in the people of Idaho
beyond the salary they get. Should
their enterprise fall many will move
on to new and more fertile field
and the people of Idaho will pay
the bills left behind.
What the people need to do today
more than they have at any other 1
by time, Is to do their own thinking, i
Unless we do, our troubles are go-1
ing to he greater: not In the other |
f P Uow but in ourselves, our sys
terns, because We have abandoned
control of them to some glaring
ignoramuses who have never made
a success of anything. They have
of nothing of their own: but want
what the people have In order to
gain political power ana prestige In
; order to further their own selfish
and Ignorant ends. Their campaign
Is that of befogging the Issues by
appealing to personal prejudices, by
I
discrediting some of the
ministrations of
have ever had. both
best ad
government
we
county and
state, and contorting the truth
meet their selfish desires,
doctrines and methods
It is the same old pill
coating which is intended to deceive
the people into believing the results
will be different.
Our instructions to the voters of
Clearwater county are to compare
the records of the candidates seek
ing election. Just stip a few mo
ments, consider the facts, and de
cide for yourself which is the course
of wisdom for you to take. At »'1er
tion time above all other times
for the people to d<
their own thinking and make
best choice in selecting the
to
Their
are not new.
1th a new
can
the
is
the
moment
the
manat,
of our public affairs for the fu
period.
i
tur
Every farmer in Clearwater conn
ty who lias
Non-partisan
paid his $is to
league knows
the
,, . that
the one thing he is told, yes T-O-l,
I) lo do Is how to vote
dor a BO
lltioal
He is un
He surrenders ills
po
independence,
of them knows this is
ought to be ashamed of it.
Every
true
one
and
More Facts on
Our Free Trade
is
a
FACTS AND FIGURES SHOW LOSS
TO IDAHO FARMERS—
TARIFF NEEDED
The great northwest is beginning
to suffer from the blight of free
trade. Here are a few illustrations
of how it is effecting our principal
industries.
It will be remembred that the
present free trade law became ef
fective in 1913.
1914 it was in full operation and
panic conditions were beginning to
appear throughout the United States.
Then came the great war, during
which this country enjoyed the
highest protection which it is pos
sible to imaging, since it not only
had the enjoyment of its own mar
kets hut It had as well almost a
monopoly of the principal markets
of the world.
By the end of June of the present
year the world's shipping had
'urned to something like its normal
condition and on July 1st the Gov
ernment withdrew Its guarantee of
a minimum price for wheat. This
date may therefore be fairly regard
ed as the date of our return to free
trade conditions under the present
law. Here Is what has happened
to some of Idaho's industries in
just three months of free trade.
Idaho's wheat crop for 1920 is es
timated at 21,500,(100 bushels. At
the June 17th price of $2.90 per
bushel (Chicago) this crop of wheat
would have brought $62,350.000. At
the September 17 th prtce of $2.34
per bushel (Chicago) this
brought but $50.310,000,
which may be attributed to free
trade of $12,040,000
In 1919 the state produced 1,500,
000 tons ef alfalfa hay which sold
for approximately $31,950,000. The
value of this crop at the present
price per ton (not more than $7)
would be but $10,500,000.
Within the last six months there
have been brought into the United
States from New Zealand. Australia
and the Argentine the carcasses of
approximately 1,500,000 lambs, ag
gregating approximately 50,000,000
pounds of frozen meat. When the
first ship-load reached the United
States the price of Idaho top lambs
dropped 3 l-2c a pound in a single
day. This drop has never been re
covered and will not be recover,d
so long as our stockmen are forced
to compete with the producers of
these countries.
By the summer of
re
a
be
is
of
re
the
crop
a loss
I Idaho hay cannot be fed to a
fr02en New Zealand Iamb The im _
por t a tion of 50,000.000 pounds of
he mutton in six months tends largely
to destroy tiie sheep industry of the
western states. It means that sheep
men can no longer pay Idaho farm-1
it ers $10 to $15 per ton for their
hay. and still prosper, but worse
than this it means that they cannot
be even continue to pay from $5 to$7
a ton for hay and survive,
of Chicago quotations for Idaho top
and lambs at different times during the
present year have been as follows:
January 2nd .*18.50
Is June 17th . 17.00
be September 17th . 13.75
If Idaho's lamb crop this year is
taken at 1,500.000 lambs, weighing
an average of 75 pounds each, the
value of this crop on the dates in
dicated would have been as follows:
pay January 2nd $20,812.500
June 17th .19,125.0001
September 17th .... 15,468,7501
1 -1
i Loss due to free trade. . $5,343,750 j
go-1 The price of cattle on the Chicago
| market on June 17th was $13.60 for
sys- medium steers. On September 17th
the price was $12.00, a difference
of $16.00 in the price of 100 lb.
steers. On the assumption that Ida
have ho produces this year 100,000 steers
want for market the decrease In the value
to thereof due to free trade conditions
In will be approximately $1.600.000.
This may mean the difference be
tween prosperity and bankruptcy.
by And so the grain growers, and
by (Contniued on last page)
I
Gooding Favors
Your Protection
PUTS ISSUE SQUARELY UP TO
PEOPLE FREE TRADE
IS BIG ISSUE
Following are some of tile
tracts of the speech of
Frank it. Gooding
can candidate for the United States
senate, delivered at Elk
week ago Monday,
the Elk River News,
printed here for the benefit of the
citizens
were
first hand.
ex
is
ex-governor
I Idaho, republi
River a
ns taken from
They are re
f Clearwater county
unable to hear the address at
ho
"This
campaign is
fought on tiie issues in
going to tie
tiie two plat
forms." asserted Mr. Gooding. "You
will either vole
for Cox because you
want a continuance of tiie Wilson
policies and are In
league of nations, without reserva
tion or amendments, and are in fa
vor of a free trade policy, or you
will vote for Warren G. Harding
and the party that is going against
ills league of nations and has al
ways stood for protection to Ameri
can industries and American labor.
favor of bis
"Eight years of a weak, vaclllat
waiting policy at
witli its-' misrule, ex
lack of enforcement of
ing watchful,
Washington,
travagance,
the laws at all times subservient to
the disloyal element of tills country,
has brought about a condition that
fills the future with doubt and
certainty, until the great question
before the American people today
is 'Americanism'; the saving of
America for Americans. Upon the re
publican party rests a mighty
sponsibility.
great party in the coming election
we will preserve those principles of
government that Washington fought
for, that Lincoln died for and
boys so ably defended on the battle
fields of Europe.
"If 1 am elected to the United
States senate, I am going to make
a fight for more rigid immigration
laws; for a time I would stop all
immigration and Americanize thone
who are fit to become American
citizens and deport those who are
unfit.
un
re
if we can save that
ef
to
a
of
in
es
At
per
At
free
sold
The
$7)
of
ag
the
re
of
of
our
There should be but
one
language in this country and but
one fing, the stars and stripes for
We have been in such a mad
rush to do things that we have giv
en but little consideration to
citizenship. We have accepted people
from every country on earth regard
less of their fitness to become citi
zens, until today 103 different lan
guages are spoken in America. We
have made much to-do about deport
ing a few bolshevlsts, less than 400
in all, and while we were doing
that work we have permited hun
dreds of thousands of foreigners to
land upon our shores,
hundred times that we grow a Utile
slower but truer to American prin
ciples. After all, what shall it pro
fit the American people if we gain
all the wealth in the world, build
up the greatest institutions that civ
ilization has ever known, only in
the end to see them torn down and
destroyed by the mob."
"There never has been a time la
the history of this government when
the deocratic party passed a free
trade measure but that It haa
brought ruin and disaster to the
country, and I am not making an
exception of the present measure,
known as the Underwood and Sim
mons bill passed by this administra
tion."
all
re
our
Better a
loss
"The democratic party takes the
position that everything the farmer
has is raw material and that all raw
material should be on the free list.
The democratic party has given pro
tection to the manufacturing indus
tries of America with the exception
of farming machinery and barbed
wire—these they have put on the
free list and tell the farmers it has
been done to give them cheaper
machinery and barbed wire,
is an insult to the intelligence of
the American fanner for the in
ventive genius on the American farm
a
im _
of
the
farm-1 has given the world its improved
their
to$7
top
the
17.00
13.75
is
the
in
there is already a demand in the
large cities for cheaper food pro
ducts, and unless the farmers of
the country send men to Washingtin
who understand the importance of
j protection to the agricultural and
livestock interests, there Is grave
for danger that this country will be
17th come a free trade country as far as
farm products and livestock are con -
lb. cerned.
Ida- "Icare not what occupation a man
steers may follow—-be he merchant, bank
value er. or lawyer—if he lives in north
ern Idaho he is just as much inter
ested In the protection of agricut
be- ture and livestock as the farmer and
the livestock grower, for there is
and just as much prosperity in Idaho as
(Contniued on last page)
This
farming machinery. We have never
used any foreign made farm ma
chinery or barbed wire, and put
ting it in the free list has not bene
fited the farmer.
"The republican party believes
that the fat steer, the wheat and the
oats and everything the farmer
grows are just as much finished
products as the products of the mill
—all require labor to produce and
all should be treated alike. As I
see the future of America, there is
going to be a great struggle between
the producers and the consumers;

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