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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, August 05, 1921, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1921-08-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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SCHOOL DAYS

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Something to
Think About
By F. A. tVALKER
RUBBING THE LAMP
O F ALL tbs stories that eut of a
far-distant past have come down
to entertain and teach us none Is
more compelling In Its Interest than
that ef Aladdin and bis wonderful
lamp.
There are several versions ef the
fact, but one feature remains the same
in all the variations—In order to get
the benefits which the lamp bad pow
er to confer the possessor had to rub
It
In other words, it took WORK to
get the desired results and to enjoy
the benefits.
• • •
The greatest disgrace In thlo life
to to bo Idle. To produce nothing,
to food upon the mental or physical
labors of others, reduces man to a
rank lower than the animals, for they
strive at least for their food.
"Ho Is not only Idle who does
nothing," says 8eneca, "but he is idle
who might be better employed."
The thing to do Is to find that task
for which you are best fitted, which
you can do with the greatest efficiency
and the greatest pleasure, and do that
task with all your might.
a
Count your efforts by results.
The punch that does not land never
overcomes your opponent.
The bullet that spends Its
energy
in the air never helped to win a battle.
Production, RESULTS, is what truly
measures endeavor and fixes Its value.
Idleness is emptiness. Emptiness as
to the present, emptiness as to the
future.
One of the most Indefatigable work
ers lu America, a man whose accom
plishments are known the world over
and whose name Is a synonym for ac
complishment In his profession said
In a lecture to a group of young men
recently : "The mau who works only
with the purpose of self-preservation;
whose only object In life la to satisfy
his hunger, cover his nakedness and
provide himself a shelter, may be good
but be won't be good for much."
A man WITH A BRAIN lught to
have something that the machine can
not bave. He ought to bave aspiration
and ambition and a vision of a better
future.
If 1 0 has not how Is he better than
the combination of belts and gears
beside which he works?
I could never quite see why Adam
was very severely punished when as
a result of his Infraction of the rules
of Eden he was told, "In the sweat
of tby face ehalt thou eat bread." 1
cannot believe that the Creator looked
upon work as a curse, a punishment.
*
Work has brought more joy Into the
world, cured more sorrows, mended
more broken hearts and built more
happiness than any other function of
mankind.
Carlyle pu Id a splendid tribute to
work when he wrote, "There Is a noble
ness and even a sacredness In work.
There Is always hope In a man who
actually and earnestly works. The
latest gospel in the world Is, know
thy work and do It."
Work will make us love life.
Encouragea Infection.
Dr. Eric Pritchard suggests lu the
Practitioner (London) that eating too
much carbohydrate material makes
persons susceptible to Infectious dis
eases. This Is Important to mothers
-of young children, as It means that
they should restrict the quantity of
starchy and sugary foods that their
offspring eat.
Overdoing It.
The man who lays by a borrowed
umbrella for a rainy day is altogether
too thrifty.—Boston Transcript
it Is Ihe one means of satisfying
ambition.
It Is the one way to turn dreams
Into realities.
It Is the ONLY way by which a
man can prove hla right to existence
and establish the wisdom of ths Cre
ator In having made him.
The best part of the story of Alad
din and his lamp was that be bad to
rub the lamp to get results. He had
to work to accomplish what he sought.
And that was much more satisfying
than ever marrying the Sultan's daugh
ter and living happily ever after.
o
umiMimiimiiiiiiimiimmmiiiiiiimiu
I THE GIRL ON THE JOB |
How to Succeed—How to Get Ë
_ Ah ea d— How to Make Good '■£
I By JESSIE ROBERTS |
üiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiB
LECTURE-TEACHING
I
N PARIS, «hen our soldier boys
were on leave and seeing the sights
of the great city, it was common to
meet an American girl taking a
bunch of the boya through one
the other of the museums that make
part of Itz glories. They made these
trips Interesting by telling stories
about many of the famous pictures and
statues.
I
or
Anna Curtis Chandler is doing some
thing of the same sort in her Sunday
Story Hour for children In the Metro
politan museum in New York city. She
confines her work to the lecture hall,
however, and Illustrates what she says
with stereoptlcon slides.
Is an Idea here thaï might be carried
out in many of our smaller cities aud
towns. There are often excellent lit
tle museums ln such towns whose con
tents, If they were brought to the at
tention of the young people, and the
older ones, too, would add Immensely
to the appreciation and understanding
of art and beauty In a community, as
well as to the knowledge of the his
tory of art. A clever girl who wished
to do this sort of work would have to
take a course In art history. She
would need to understand the different
periods, to know the masters. She
would be able to find much Interest
ing material on which to build her
stories, much human Interest, too.
Working with the co-operation of the
curator, and advertising her talks In
a way that would attract her fellow
townsmen, she might make a real suc
cess of this now little-worked form of
lecture-teaching.
But there
(Copyright)
O
ir
•4
WITH THAT VOICE
I have formed the habit of
einging at my werk.
•he:
He:
How you muet hate It
O
Thst'e Right
A measure which alms to tench the
children how to play appears to be
not without merit when the school*
are being urged to do so much that
probably doe* not add to the Joy of the
youthful life.—Boston Transcript.
WELL WORTH KNOWING
A species of the genista plant,
growing prollflcally In Italy, has been
found to yield a fiber stronger than
hemp and almost as fine as flax for
cordage and textiles.
An English shipbuilder once defied
superstition by naming a brig "Fri
day" and launching her on Friday.
She sailed on a Friday and on the
following Friday went down In n
storm.
Moil
l_
Book
_i
1 wander'd Lonely a* a cloud
That float* on high o'ar valea and hilla
^ hen all at once i saw a crowd,
I A host, of golden daffodils.
. Beside the lake, beneath the trees.
Fluttering and dancing In the breeeaa.
—Wordsworth.
WHAT TO HAVE FOR DINNER.
^yl.ANNING the family meals Is not
* h task to be spoken of lightly, for
h means much thinking, planning and
economy, a nice dish which will be
liked by the family and will be asked
for again Is:
Codfish Chowder.
Take two thick slices of salt pork,
cut Into small cubes and fry until
brown ; add one-half dozen potatoes
sliced, three small onions also sliced,
cover with boiling water and cook un
til the vegetables are tender,
two cupfuls of shredded salt codfish
and one quart of hot milk ; cook for
five minutes, add one-half dozen milk
crackers softened In boiling water
and serve at once.
Add
8oup From Bones of Fowls.
Remove all bits of meat from the
bones of a fowl.
Separate the bones
at the Joints and crush with a ham
mer; add all the bits of skin, pieces
of neck and the feet which have been
scalded and skinned. Cover with cold
water and set over the fire. Melt three
tablespoonfuls of chicken fat, slice
Into It an onion, three stalks of cel
ery and a scraped carrot, add three
sprigs of parsley, a blade of mace,
cover and let cook, stirring occasion
ally until softened and yellowed slight
ly. By covering the dish the vege
tables will steam In the fat and their
own moisture. Add to the bones with
s cupful of left-over canned corn und
simmer partly for an hour; remove
the bones and strain through a fine
sieve.
a
to
This broth may be used In
making almost any variety of soup. By
the addition of salt, pepper and a small
can of tomato aoup, a particularly
good tomato aoup results.
Banana Salad.
Slice one-half dozen bananas and
chop one cupful of walnuts fine; add
a little salt and mix with enough may
onnaise dressing to make the salad
of the right consistency; add on# cup
ful of freshly-roasted peanuts, and
serve on lettuce.
Young cooked beets hollowed out
and filled with peas, peanuts and
chopped pickles makes, with a good
well-seasoned dressing, a most tasty
salad.
|
Ë
'■£
|
a
Ham Loaf.
Chop one and one-half pounds of
add ons and one
uncooked ham,
fourth pounds of round steak chopped,
one-half pound of lean fresh pork
chopped. Mix well, add two well
beaten eggs, one cupful of on (meal
rolled oats, one teaspoonful of salt
and one teaspoonful of pepper (level).
Mix and bake In a loaf one hour.
or
'Hutu* 7 vu*i «tiSL
<©. Ult WMt.m N.w.p.p.r Union.)
THE WOODS
By DOUGLAS MALLOCH
THE PA8SENQER PIGEONS.
W HERE roam ye now, ye nomads
of the air?
The old-time heralds of our old
time Springs?
Once, when we heard the thunder
of your wings,
We looked upon the world—and Spring
was there.
One time your armies swept
the sky,
Your feathered millions In a mighty
march
Filling with Ufa and music all the
arch
Where now a lonely swallow flutters
across
by.
Where roam ye now, ye nomads of
the nlr?
In what far land? What undiscov
ered place?
Ye may have found the refuge ef
the race
That mortals visit but In dream end
prayer.
Perhaps In some blest lend ye wing
your flight.
Now undisturbed by murder and by
greed.
And there await the coming o t the
freed
Who shall emerge, like ye, from earth
end nlgfat.
(Capyrlskt.)
Preserve Scottish Phrase*.
The Scotch origin of many north of
Ireland families Is ahdwn by the com
mon words In use. Both speak of a
burn, but In both Scotland and Ulster
the phrase wee stream la much am
likely to be beard.
The greater part of the foreign
trade of India passes through the port
of Calcutta.
To help solve Its fuel problem the
government of Brazil Is encouraging
the planting of eucalyptus trees.
A method has been perfected for
spinning glass into practically end
less threads, which can be wound
spools like ordinary thread and used
for many purposes.
on
II
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RAINY-DAY SURPRISE
T WAS raining In torrents outside
and little Marietta sat curled up
on the window seat with her nose
pressed against the pane. Now Mari
etta was very cross, for the old rain
had spoiled the garden party she had
planned this afternoon with her dolls.
Splash ! Splash ! came the raindrops,
chasing one another down the glass,
and Marietta, whose eyes were sadly
watching them, thought there was
nothing in the world as ugly us the
little round drops. They came down,
oh, so steadily, and Marietta was be
ginning to feel very drowsy when sud
denly an extra hard gust of wind
I
PWAffTke
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£
95
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drove the raindrops sharply at the
window.
"Listen to me!" cried a shrill little
voice from the pane.
Marietta looked up quickly. "How
queer," she said, "there is nothing but
these old raindrops In sight."
"We are not old," said the voice.
"If you look very hard you can see
for ypurself."
Then Marietta saw that each little
drop was a tiny, tiny water sprite in
a beautiful shining dress which
changed color as It rolled down the
wlndowpane.
"We felt ao sorry about spoiling
your party that our queen said we
might tell you about us," continued
the sprite.
HOW DO YOU SAY IT?
By C. N. LURIE
Cqbiimb Errata In
English
tSsst
How to Avoid
"THESE SORT," "THOSE KIND."
A COMMON error, and one that
grates with especial harshness
on the ear of a person who has been
trained {n the correct use of English,
Is the use of such phrases as "those
kind" and "these sort." How often
we hdhr, "I cannot bear those kind of
R*°P le "
"The words "these" and "those" are
plural In number—that Is, they denote
more than one; the words "sort,"
"kind," etc., are singular in number,
indicating one group, one class of per
sons or objects. According to a slm
pie rule of grammar, the adjective
and the noun, when used together,
must agree In number that Is, when
the noun Is singular or plural the ad
Jectlve must be singular or plural,
Therefore do not say, "I do not like
those kind of people,*' but say *'I do
not like that kind of people," or, bet
ter, "I do not like people of that kind."
(Copyrisht.)
O
A LINE 0 r CHEER
By John Kendrick Bangs.
FAITH
ECAUSE a thing'* a Mystery
Doe* not deatroy the FAITH
of me,
There'e lote of things on ee* and
land
I don't pretend to understand.
And y*t I sea them plain and flat
In aplte of that
"Tie oo with LIFE and Tou and Me.
We don't know how we came to be.
But I've a sort of faith aupreme
That we're not all an Idle dream.
And that eorae time long, long ago.
Just when, or how, I do not know.
Some Mind with purpose true and
clear.
Created Earth and put ua here.
And gave ua life, and love and wit.
To make a fairer place of It.
To call It CHANCE some folks
delight;
I call It OOD—and know I'm right.
(Copyright)
B
«c
* ✓
grFQ
*.«**•
▲ PEDESTRIAN once.
"I aaa Bradley riding on the street
cars. I thought he owned an auto."
"He does, hat he made the mis
take ef teaching hie wife to drive
-
O
There Are Exception*
"A woman Is more graceful than a
man," observed the Sage.
"Not when she's getting off a street
car," commented the Fool.—Cincin
nati Enquirer.
■Hssrrrr?
lui
"Who is jour queen, and where does
she live?" asked Marietta.
The raindrop answered proudly:
"She Is the queen of all the rain
sprites and lives In a wonderful silver
palace behind the clouds and la al
ways doing good In the world."
"Well, why did she spoil my party
by sending you down here today?"
said Marietta in a grieved tone.
"That Is just what we wanted to
tell you about," broke in the raindrop,
"but we had to shout and shout before
you would listen. Our queen watches
over the trees, flowers and grass and
every growing thing, and when she
sees they need water to drink she calls
us together. It Is usually the night be
fore, so we may rest before filling our
silver water buckets."
"Do you have wells up there in the
clouds from which to fill up your buck
ets?" inquired Marietta eagerly, for
so Interested about this
she was
strange cloudland.
"Not exactly," replied the raindrop
"The queen's palace Is surrounded by
wonderful gardens and there are foun
tains everywhere shooting up beautiful
tiny drops of color."
"How perfectly lovely !" sighed Mari
etta. '1 wish I could see them."
"Why, you foolish child, you do see
them every time our queen has a fes
tival. When we do our work extra
well she rewards us by letting us
watch the half-circle of fountains.
First comes red, then orange, yellow,
green and blue, each shading Into the
other."
"Why, that Is our rainbow!" inter
rupted Marietta, delightedly.
"Of course It Is!" laughed the rain
drop. "Our queen is very generous
and always draws aside the cloud cur
tains when she sails away so that you
can see the lovely colors In the sky.
And now I must hurry or my special
pansy will be thirsty."
"Oh! do come again!" called Mari
etta after him, as he scampered after
his friends, and she was sure he nod
ded his head and smiled as he jumped
•IT the sill.
(Copyright.)
"What's in a Name?"
By MILDRED MARSHALL
F*c*s about TOUT name; tsa hlatorn
tat whew» » wii d t ihp a d i MznÜCTna»)
your lucky day and lucky IcwaL
IDA
f^URIOUSLY enough, Ida and Ada
are practically synonymous, ae
cording to etymologists. Certainly the
names were used interchangeably. In
early times. Ada was thought to be
an entirely separate entity and
believed to be derived from Adah,
meaning ornament and the name Adah
was given to the wife of Lamech in
the Old Testament But later etymo
logical authorities believe that Ada Is
merely a latinized form of Ead, mean
lng happy or rich, and the same as the
German Ida.
Ida originates from Frau Uote, moth
er of Friemhlld, who Interpreted her
dream and predicted the death of her
bridegroom, Ortwin of Metz. A num
her of feminine names came from Uote
or Uta, and finally the name Adur was
evolved. Audur was a viking da ugh
ter, one of the first Icelandic settlers,
in England, under Norman rule, there
appeared Auda and Alda, the 'latter
the wife of Orlando the Paladin. An
other Alda was a queen of Italy in
026 and still another famous bearer
of the name was a daughter of the
house of Este In 1803. High German
called the name Oda, but low German
made It Ead, and from this latter Ide
and Idette were evolved, both of which
became enormously popular.
Ida was the name given to the
granddaughter of King Stephen, who
became the Countess of Boulogne. Both
Ida and Ada, the simplest terms possible
of any féminine name, have been the
basts of a number of other more In
volved derivatives. Some seem hardly
recognizable, as in the case of Othllle,
a name still very popular In Teutonic
countries. The Original Othllle
an Alsatian virgin who was bom blind
but obtained her sight at baptism.
Ida's gem Is the turquoise, which
promises her protection from accident
or sudden death. Like malachite, It
la aald to break as a warning of ap
proaching danger. To wear It Insures
good fortune and nothing Is so
dudve to good luck as to see the
moon reflected In Its depths. Tues
day Is Ida's lucky day and seven her
lucky number.
was
was
con
new
(Copyright.)
O
How Itf 5 tarted
PINS.
T HESE indispensable little articles
were once so expensive that few
could afford them.
In about I486
France manufactured them In
quon
tlty. In 1636 the plnmakers of Eng
land established the first pinmaking
corporation, and established the fac
tories at Bristol and Birmingham.
Birmingham is still the center of the
Industry. In Birmingham, Conn., the
first pinmaking factory In the United
States was started In 1836.
(CopvrlfbLI
DESTRUCTION OF
WEEDS IS MED
Noxious Plants Are With Us Al
ways and Are Often Accepted
as Inevitable Evil.
CONTROL PROBLEM IS VITAL
Even Wild Onion, So Long Considered
Hopeless, Can Be Destroyed and
So Can Others, If Farmers
Follow Set Rules.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
Weeds have been with us since the
day when Adam, doomed to earn hls_
bread by the sweat of bis brow, began
scraping with a stick at the plants he
did not want In order to give those he
did want a chance to grow. In modem
days farmers are apt to Ignore weeds
or to accept them as an inevitable evil.
Weed Destruction Paramount.
The results of over 200 experiments
conducted by the United States De
partment of Agriculture with various
crops strongly indicate that after pre
paring the seed bed, the main object
of cultivation is to destroy weeds. If
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A Knowledge of Weed Characteristics
Provides Means of Control.
this theory is correct the weed-control
problem overshadows all others wltb
which the. farmer is confronted. Mod
ern agricultural science has discovered
much concerning the control and erad
ication of these insidious land thieves.
The wild onion, for example, was con
sidered a hopeless problem from Mas
sachusetts to Georgia, and as far west
as Missouri and Arkansas until a weed
specialist In the Department of Agri
culture discovered that the plant pro
dticed two kinds of bulbs. One type
was soft-coated, and formed the new
plants during late summer and fall;
the other was hard so that It was un
harmed by winter, and ready to form
the new plants in the spring. With
this to guide them the specialists
proved that the wild onion can be con
trolled by plowing deeply in the late
fall to destroy the plants originating
from the soft-coated bulbs, and by
planting an intertilled crop, such
corn, the following spring to kill the
plants that come up front the hard
conted bulbs.
Weedy
as
roadsides
constant
sources of trouble for the adjoining
farm lands. The seeds are carried
miles by automobiles, horses, and pass
ing wagons, so that they become a
menace to the whole community,
nothing better can be done with the
roadside weeds they can be mowed
twice a year. This treatment, If well
kept up, will effectively check the trou
ble. Sometimes a roadside can be con
verted into a lawn, or It can be used
for crops, to the pride and profit
the farmers whose land it borders.
Control Measures.
The underlying principles of
control are shown In these rules by
the specialists of the United States
Department of Agriculture:
Use pure seed.
Rotate the farm
are
If
of
weed
crops.
Utilize pasturing animals, particu
larly sheep und goats, in keeping
weeds down.
Never allow weeds to mature. Mow
before the seeds have ripened.
Use Intertilled
often.
crops, and cultivate
Kill weeds while they are young by
means of a harrow or a weeder.
Compost manure for two months be
fore using if it contains weed Beeds.
Practice surface cultivation
the crops have been
fall.
after
removed In the
Use smother crops; buckwheat, soy
beans, cowpens, velvet beans, clover
etc. '
Chemical poisons often are helpful
Prepare the seed beds thoroughly
give the crop a start over the weeds.
Use winter cover crops.
Hunt out the scattered weeds
kill them.
to
and
Mow dangerous
the dry cuttings.
Small patches of
grasses and burn
perennial weeds
can be killed by covering for the en
tire season with building paper, boards
or other materials to exclude the light'
Kill the roots of perennial
keeping the tops cut down.
Grow alfalfa, when
weed-infested land.
Soil Improvement by the
or green manure will help to
the weeds.
Soiling crops prevent the
reaching maturity
weeds by
practicable, on
use of lime
control
weeds from

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