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Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, September 16, 1921, Image 1

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Clearwater Republican
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CLEARWATER COUNTY
OROFINO, CLEARWATER COUNTY, IDAHO
VOLUME X NUMBER 85.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, I98t
* —
REX THEATRE PRESENTS
The Soul of Y outh" by Julia Crawford Ivers
Thursday, Fri M Saturday
u
THE STORY OF A BOY. AND JUDGE LINDSEY'S
COURT, A STORY THAT WILL WARM YOUR HEART
WITH LOVE AND SYMPATHY FOR THE MANY OR
PHAN CHILDREN WHO KNOW NOTHING OF THE
COMFORTS OF HOME.
GIVING YOU AN INSIGHT OF THE WORKINGS
AND RESULTS OF JUDGE LINDSEY'S COURT.
JUDGE LINDSEY AND HIS WIFE BOTH APPEAR
IN THIS GREAT PICTURE.
September 22, 23, 24
DONKEY AND THE LION'S SKIN
'J THE
Also Aesop's Fable
9 9
Cartoon Comedy
u
WRITES ENTERTAININGLY OF El
HISTORY OF THE NEZ PERCE INDIANS
Pictured, and Written by J. P. Har
lan, Giving a Graphic Descrip
tion of Early Day Events.
up
(Continued from last week)
The women dressed in a shirt like
garment that At loosely and reached
below the knees and leggings and
moccasins. It might he ornamented
with gaudy colored porcupine quills
wrought in fancy patterns, feathers
and elk teeth. They sometimes wore
a hat made from bark and Aber. The
.children were dressed much the same.
In summer they all dressed more
nagllgee. After they began trading
with the whites they obtained beads,
and the clothing of both sex was often
highly ornamented with them. Like
other tribes, the Nez Perce remained
skin dressed until the fur traders came
among them. | Then they soon became
blanket Indians, using the blanket for
an outer covering, but they used skins
up to later times, let me not forget,
It was a piece of sea shell fastened In
the nose which gave them the name
of Pierce Nose or Nez Perce. Shortly
after the advent of the whites they
quit this custom.
The principal diet of the Nez Perce
at this time was Ash, roots and meat,
the dependency in the order named.
The salmon made their annual runs
Into all their streams. They were
taken In great quantities and prepared
by diying for the rest of the season's
use. They procured their Ash by div
nets, traps, spears and hooks.
The dip nets were made of a pole
with a willow and Aber net. Fish traps
or weirs were made of poles and
stakes interlaced with willow switches,
with daring outwlngs where the Ash
were impounded and taken out by dip
nets or spears.
Their spears were long light poles
with two slender prongs, at one end,
two pieces of hard wood, like yew
(or Iron when they got It), were
shaped and sharpened and a piece of
buckhom split in two and each half
hollowed out and the end of the two
halves wrapped tightly with tendon
about one end of the sharpened stick,
at the ume time wrapping In a thong
of buckskin. The other end of the
buckhorn making the spear head, was
still more hollowed out so aB to At
tightly over the ends of the »lender
prongs and the long buckskin thong
was tied back of the prongs. The
spear wus cast by throwing or Jabb
ing. The Bpear heads would pass
through a Ash. the prongs withdrawn,
leaving the thongs to hold the Ash
while landing It. The Indian was clev
er In handling the .spear.
Their Ash hooks were made of buck
horn by toughening In hot water, shap
ing, sharpening and bending it while
hot. A Ash line was made of Aber of
root, several shreds being twisted to
gether.
The Nez Perce of this early time,
and when Lewis and Clark came
among them, were very expert canoe
men. Clark relates this In an Instance.
He was down the river on what Is now
the Chase farm, opposite the mouth of
the North Fork, where he had found
suitable timber to make their large
eanoes, In which to AniBh their trip
to the coast. He and his party started
back up the river for their (camp a
short ways below -the mouth of Ford's
creek. Two Indians with their caroe
started about the same time and ar
rived in time to set the party across
the river.
I
I
as
Their canoes were of the Chinook
type, and made by burning, sere ping
and hewing, and were light and ser
vicable, being mostly made of cedar,
but pine was often used. They pro
pelled the canoe up stream by poling
and down by paddling. They used
the canoe In fishing, in visiting their
fish weirs and in moving their abodes
up and down the rivers when not mov
ing overland. They could not visit all
their fish weirs by canoe, One of their
best Ashing places where they had
weirs was near the head of the Loch
sa, which they visited by traveling
the old Lolo trail.
The two principal root diets were
kamas (or quamash) and kouse.
Kamas grew abundantly in the open
meadows of the timbered areas,
Weippe being one oi the greatest
summer camping places when gath
ering this root. The arangemont
meadows were frequented and much
grew in the Craig Mountain sec ion
and Kamas Prairie. Kouse grew
more along the breaks of the val
leys. Potlatch creek was a favorite
place for it. It was 1 very labori
ous and tedious process to gather
enough of these roots and prepare
them for the winters use. There
were many other roots and plants
eaten by these Indians, *«d berries
were gathered and prepared for stor
age. In pinched food periods a c r
tain moss of the trees ^nd the inner
bark of the pine was eaten. All
the details of this will not be fol
lowed out in this article.
Meat was another favorite diet
they procured when they could. Deer
and elk belonged to tlje same habi
tat with them. But the crude wea
pons in use by them at the time
made it hard and uncertain to ob
tain the quantity desiied. They re
sorted to strategy of various kiidi
to get within range 4ith their ar
rows. In winter a large pariy would
get on snowshoes and attempt to
encircle a bunch of deer or elk ami
when the snow was d«fep enough to
hamper the actions of their quarry
they would be quite successful in
making a good kill. But the w n
ters were frequently unfavorable
for this.
of
of
a
ar
[rick was to
Another favorite
fix up the head of the deer with all
the fore part of the skin attached.
The neck was made t<i look natural
by a set of hoops firing Inside. An
Indian would conceal (himself in the
remaining skin, place himself on
the edge of an openlAg near a
thicket In sight of deer and then go
through the maneuver* of a de r
feeding. Some tlmea other Indians
I would camouflage themselves In the
thicket. The decoy might bring tha
game close up, then the Indian-- con.
eealed would let drive their arrows
and make their kill.
After the Nez Perce obtained the
pony, they used. It In the chaee of
the deer and elk. Bat thto cou'ri
only be done in the jtpen country,
much of their land betyig rough and
broken or timbered, their skill would
be very limited througlt nis method
The continuation of thto interest
ing story will appear In next week's
Issue of the Républicain.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MET |
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 18
The Board of County Commission
ers met on Monday, September 12,
to make tax Ivies for present year.
The real property valuations for
year 1921 Is $8,489,611.00 and th:
county levy» fixed by the Board is
as follows:
Current Expense
General Bridge.
General Road...
General School..
Is
r
All
ob
re
.006
.0006
.0025
.006
.013
Total County Levy
State Levy .
Total State and County Levy .019
Predatory animal tax on sheep .001
Predatory animal tax on cat
tle, horses and hogs.0026
Levy of .0026 on all property in
county and state highway.
The total :real property va'ua
tlon In 1920 was $8,760,102.00 and
the tota levy was thesame as this
.006
year.
The only ' difference in s parate
levies Is in the state, and county
current expense.
The State levy this year to thr e
tenths of a mill less than last year
and the county current expense levy
Is three-tenths of a mill more for
1921 than for 1920.
The valuation of the personal roll
will be about $100,000.00, making
the grand total county valuation for
the present year about $8,600,000.
CARD OF THANKS.
We sincerely appreciate the kind
ly assistance and encouragement
of friends and neighbors during the
sickness of our beloved husband and
dear father and are also grateful
for expressions of comfort In our
bereavement. We especially thank
the Modern Woodmen and Royal !
Neighbors for sympathetic acts of
1
fraternity.
Mrs. S. H. Rodgers,
Mrs. J. W. Rodgers.
|L
m
W
*
|P^lAÏÏ?ICTôii^l
THE So£ofYOUTH* j
1
o
A WILLIAM 0. TAYLOR PRODUCTION.
REVIVAL SERVICES
INTEREST AAANY
The revival services at the Chris
tian church are now in the seer ni
week, audiences and interest are on
the increase. You are missing some
services worth while if you hove not
been attending these meetings.
Make your plans to be there. Don't
miss one of the services. Mr. Jope
Is a real bible teacher, able to im
part his knowledge to others. He
believes the bible and mak s no
apology for its teachings.
Mrs. Jope Is conducting afternoon
meetings for boys and girls, besides
telling stories at the evening meet-j
ings.
Subjects for the week follows:
Friday—Special service, boys a d
girls smile chorus will have
charge of the music. Sermon,
"Power of a Life."
Saturday—"Just a Little Girl."
Sunday—10:00 a. m. bible school,
attend this school. A. M. Memor
ial Stories. 7:00 p. m.. Christian
Endeavor. 7:45 p. m. "The Crime
of the Church."
Monday—"Riding to Four Anchor-."
Tuesday—"Tabernacle Types."
Wednesday—"Four Men Under One
Hat."
Thursday—"Chart Sermon."
A cordial invitation is ex ended to
you to attend these services. You'U
miss it If you miss them. Bach
evening at 7:46.
MAYOR HELGESON ON SICK LIST
Village Mayor N. O. Helgeson to
! confined to his bed with a severe
ease of stomach trouble, but Is much
1 better at this time, we are pleased
to note, and expects to be at Ms desfe
again in a few days.
S1RICKEN ON WEDNESDAY
WITH INFANTILE PARALY IS
B. S. Murray, of Fraser, a well
known citizen of Clearwater County,
and a former resident of the Caven
dish locality, died at his ranch near
Fraser, Wednesday, and was burl Jd
in the Sunnyside cemetery, near
Feck at 10:00 a. m. today.
Mr. Murray was stricken with In
fantile paralysis, a disease more com
mon with children than grown peo
pie, and Its spread is becoming
alarming.
Mr. Murray was born In Iowa
and was 44 years of ae at the tlm;
of his death. He leaves a wife and
four children to mourn his de i h
and many friends who regret h s
passing away.
of
HIGH SCHOOL DOWN TO WORK
BASKET BALL TO START EARLY
After a week of preparation the
high school settled down to work
The girls glee club has been organ
ized under the supervision of Mrs.
Kimble. It is also proboble that
piano lésons will be given In the
near future, as the Importance cl
music In the school is being recog
nized more each year. Those sub
jects will receive spclal attention.
Mr. Shanon, the athletic coach,
held a meeting with the boys to de
cide whether to have foot b'lt or
not.
But as the supply of material |
proved to be much too light, th y
decided not. As a result of the
tpeeting they decided to start basket
ball earlier than usual.
By this ex
trm practice they hope to have a
The girls gym class will be u der!
the direction of Miss Kennedy. They
expect to have Inter-class games in !
basket ball. |
Several new students came in on
Monday. The new Freshmen are: !
Marvin Dickson. Murial Jenks, Viola 1
Jenkq, Andrew Baker and Ca
winning team.
1 of
fman.
Remy and Jim Gamble of Greer
came back to attend school this
term.
Mrs. Fohl and Mr. Ede were seen
looking over the school grounds on
Monday. It Is rumored that a new
tennis court Is to be built.
Alice Marquette visited school on
Monday. The young may is »olng
to school in Portland this year.
Loyd Johnson returned Monday
to resume his high school course.
Ted Walrath returned to school
Thursday. He has been In Spokane
for a few days.
A MEETING OF TENNIS FANS
WILL BE HELD ON MONDAY
The question to: "How to play
tennis without a court?" To ascer
tain what Interest may be taken In
thto game by townspeople. < uts'de of
the school, a meeting oi me tennis j
fans Is called for next Monday evm-j
ing at the school -house, at 7:15, to j
devise plans to place a court or two.
on the school grounds for the Joint'
use of the townspeople and school, i
Those who feel that n larger r um- 1
I her of the school children should be
given the advantage of cl an sports !
are invited to be present. Take a
few minutes to be a bo st r and
shanke hands with yourself at the !
school house next Monday evening. ;
PECK BANK AGAIN
Officers Elected at Meeting Held On
Tuesday Afternoon—Deposi s
Exceed $6,000.
As stated In last week's iaaue of
the News, the State Bagk of Pcok
opened Its doors for business Thurs
day morning of last week, and the
deposits to date exceed $6,000, and
still growing.
The fact that the bank has been
closed for the past five months,
which necessitated going to other
points for banking Privileg a, brings
forcibly to mind the conven ences af
forded by an institution of this kl'
and we venture the assortira thgt
these same people will do all In tbei?
power to ease the way of the offi
cials of the bank during the pr sent
financial stress.
The success of the organization of
the hank is due to the untlrlatg ef
forts of a number of the enterpr's
ing citizens of the comunity, who
overcame many obstacles in the work
of building the new structure from
the ashes of the old, and we predict
that In time it will grow to bt r ne
of the strongest banks In this part
| of the country, situated
as we are,
the natural outlet of a prosperous
farming section.
In celebration of the occasion a
fine free dinner was served in the
Peck village hall last Saturday,
which was enjoyed by a large
ber. A spirit of good fellowship
prevailed and the ladies,
! noted for their good dinners, ou did
| themselves on this occasion and al
toether It was a day well spent.
! At the regular anual meeting of
1 the bank the following officers
num
who a-e
were
chosen:
T. A. Holmes, president; Harry
Sprinston, vice president; F. Byron
Smith, cashier; Wm. Watson, Roy
Melcum. E. H. West. E. N. Kirby,
directors.—Peck News.
A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR
FACULTY AND TRUSTEES
Special services will be held Sun
day morning for the trustees and
faculty of the Orofino schools. Rev.
J. A. Hoffmann will preach on "T4u
Three Prime Factors In Educaion."
Mrs. Kimble will sing an appropri
ate solo. On acount of apeciaT
meetings at the Christian church
no evening preaching service will
be held at the Methodist church.
Mr. Hoffmann will till another ap
I ointment in the evening.
OROFINO CREAMERY BIG ASSET.
The Orofino Creamery Company la
meeting with encouraging succ as In
j ihe Increasing sale of "O. C. C." but
ter. Th
j greater than the supply and
of cream prevents an output up to
the capacity of the creamery. Thto
i institution has been a success from
demand is c n-lderably
a la k
1 the start and is a credit to Oroftno's
industrial concerns and a satlsfac
! tlon to its stockholders. Mr. Weto
a senfluh, the manager, dose ves a
great deal of credit for the suc
! cessful operation of thto growing
; Industry.

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