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Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, December 02, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1921-12-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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SCDUI'S
(Conducted by National Council of the Boy
Scouts of A
Hca )
SCOUT LIFE SAVERS.
From October 1920 to July 1921 the
following boy scouts have been award
ed medals for heroic services by the
National Court of Honor:
Gold medals—Hale Collier, Rock
Island, 111.; Joseph H. Mardis, East
Liverpool, Ohio; George Noble, Char
iton, Iowa.
Chaires,
Van Carmen,
Silver meduls — Myers
Spring Hope, N. C. ;
Kewanee, 111.; Gordon M. Crowley,
Pittsfield, Mass. ; Frederick Doty, Plain
field. N. J.; Sam A. Fitch, Houston,
Frick, Philadelphia,
New York ;
Tex. ; Walter
Pa. ; Kenneth Gardner,
Marcus Glnsburg, Chicugo, 111.; John
Hollings, Pleusantvllle, N. Y.; George
J. Howell, Newport News, Va. ; Robert
B. Humphreys, Fresno, Cal.; Arthur
T. Lee, Newark, N. J. ; Leslie Lumbat
tls, Belleville, Bl.; Robert McGaffln.
Topeka, Kan. ; Gerhard McKee, On
tario, Cal.; Edward Moraves, West
field, Muss.; Charles Pasho, Syracuse,
N. Y. ; Austin J. Power, Brooklyn,
N. Y.; C. E. Ross, Wheeling, W. Va.;
Arthur Sommerfleld, Chicago, 111.;
Elmer R. Walker, Mott, N. D., and
Harold White, Lowell, Mass.
Henceforth, there will be only one
grade of medal awarded, made of gold
and specially designed by Belmore
Brown, the well-known explorer. The
medal will be awarded only In cases
of llfe-snvlng Involving actual risk
of life to the rescuer. For other serv
ice In saving of life and first-aid let
ters of commendation will be awarded.
Dale Collier of Rock Island, 111., will
be the first recipient of the new de
sign medal, which he earned splendid
ly by a spectacular feat of Ice rescuo
last winter.
BOY SCOUTS IN HUNGARY.
Scouting Is ten years old In Hun
gary and, though the war stopped Its
growth for a time, the movement was
reorganized and put on a firm basis
in September, 1919.
stages the Hungarian scout associa
tion was, like the German, a semi
military organization, but with Its re
establishment it has rejected the mil
itary element and founded Itself
the British and American nonmilitary
basis. The dismemberment of Hun
gary was a severe blow to the progress
of the movement Inasmuch
« than 50 per cent of the Magyar troops
are now in occupied territories. Offi
cers, money and equipment are badly
needed. Some of the boy scouts have
no money even to purchase shoes,
much less scout uniforms,
the leaders are professional
clerks who have a hard enough strug
gle to earn their own living and yet
they devote time and often money to
the cause.
"We are all the more proud," writes
a Hungarian old scout, "that despite
hardships and sufferings,
unfalteringly, with a strong soul and
In a real scout spirit, follow the path
which leads to our great goal—good
citizenship and real humanity."
The Hungarian boys are particularly
anxious to be included In the Inter
national Brotherhood of Scouts and
offer and bespeak In turn good will,
understanding and support In the
spirit of true scouting.
In Its earlier
on
as more
Most of
men or
our scouts
WHEN IN DOUBT ASK A SCOUT.
Last April a letter from the state
department of conservation and de
velopment asking for data as to the
number and species of trees in the
city of Long Branch, N'. J., is said to
have caused considerable
tlon among the local authorities. Evi
dently a tree census
once, but who could or would do the
Job? The authorities didn't know but
somebody else did. Hearing of the
quandary of the city fathers, Scout
Executive Ovenham
with the suggestion that the scouts of
his district could and would under
take the census, if desired. They did,
with excellent results
oerned.
consterna
was wanted at
came forward
to all
con
I
SCOUTS AS LIFE SAVERS.
Hal Cranton,
a thirteen-year-old
boy scout of Newark, O., saved the life
of a six-year-old child who was swept
away by the swift current while wail
ing In shallow water and bad
down In a deep pool.
Among the many heroic deeds
gone
per
formed during the Pueblo flood is the
story of the two boy scouts who,
hearing that several
«trended at the gas works and hang
ing from trees, hastened out to Min
eral Palace park, captured a canoe,
which they carried over to the swol
len river, and paddled down in the
fierce current, rescuing five
on
persons were
persons.
TO MOVE VILLAGE A MILE
United States Steel Corporation Or
dere Hibbing (Minn.) Placed
on New Site.
Pittsburgh, I'a.—The United States
Steel corporation Is going to under
take the task of moving a whole town
—Hibbing. the world's richest village—
located ln the center of the greut Iron
belt of the Mesuha range of northern
Minnesota. Within six months this
noted village, known the world over
EXPERIENCE NEEDED
WITH ALFALFA CROP
Farmer Soon Learns Best Time
for Cutting Plant.
St rongly
Government Experts Leai
Toward Fewer Crops During Year,
Holding That Larger Tonnage
Can Be Secured.
Depart
(Prepared by the United States
ment of Agriculture.)
Just when to cut alfalfa and bow
many times to harvest a crop In one
season are questions which bave re
ceived studied attention from experts
in the United States Department of
Agriculture and the various experi
ment stations in alfalfa-producing
states. Ordinarily It Is a good time
to cut alfalfa for hay when the new
shoots have started from the crown,
and from one-tenth to one-lifth of the
plants are In flower. But these two
conditions do not always occur at the
same time. However, the farmer with
a little experience, and keeping in
mind the flower and new shoots, soon
Is able to tell when his alfalfa crop
should be cut. The farmer's best Judg
ment will be called Into play, with
preference given to the welfare of the
plant rather than the size of the crop.
Experiments on government plats
seem to prove that cutting is not es
sential to the welfare of the plant,
but Is only n means of getting bay.
Piafs of alfalfa that have not been cut
r, r-m
r
$
*
$51
mm
•r'-IU
An Excellent Stand of Alfalfa.
In six years are In better physical con
dition today than those that hove
been cut regularly. Government agri
cultural experts lean strongly toward
fewer crops of alfalfa a year, holding
that as large tonnage can be secured,
for example, with three as with four
cuttings, and with less labor,
phasis Is laid on the necessity of leav
ing time enough after the last harvest
to permit the plants to get a healthy
growth, approximately four inches, be
fore frost.
Em
CULL POOR PRODUCING HENS
I
;
Work Should Be Started in Summer j
and During Early Fall Months — j
Comb Is Indicator.
I
The hens should be culled out dur
Ing the summer and early full i
months, beginning to cull out the poor
producers Just as soon as they stop (
laying, which is usually In July und
August. When a hen is laying her ;
comb will be large, full of blood, and 1
bright red In color. As she stops luy- j
ing, the comb becomes small and.
shrunken, pule or dull In color, and
is usually rather hard. Another good j
hën. Ca ih 0 , n H t0 , "I T St '' eÇ , tin f Ul0Se
hens which stop laying early Is molt
Ing, as the liens that start to molt !
early that is In July and August
are usualiy the poorest producers.
lle n ll ® n "h'oh has molted most 1
of her feathers Is very easy to pick :
out by sight without examination, the I
:z rr . „ r-r* !
when the hens begin to molt Is to lmti- 1
I
|
die them. Before the body and wing I
feathers are molted in any great mim- I
great num
her you will find short pin feathers
— « ,hW ' l >' " "* ..in
I
the feather tracts running back from
the breast, indicating that these '
have started
lens
j
to molt and probably I
have stopped laying If their
and general appearance Indicate non
production. The pelvic bones are also l
. I
j
I
comb)
helpful In making this test as thest
two bones tend to close
ben stops laying.
up when the |
If the spread be
tlieso
tween
lingers or less the probability Is that
the hen ls not laying, while If the
spread Is greater, together with other
Indications mentioned, she ls probably
laying.
hones
measures
two
j
wherever steel Is u comme, Uty. w<U he 1
u mile away from the site of its birth,
and »he great corporation's steam
shovels will be digging ore where old |
liiumnK stood.
.
corporation
was seated In bis
An engineer of the steel
said recently that be
office In New York some time ago when
phone call summoned him to the of
fice of Judge Gary, chairman of the
board.
He was hi Mr. Gary's office
only two minutes, but In those two
minutes he was asked a half dozen
qucstlors bearing on the topography :
«rar
NO BEST BREED OF POULTRY
Are Three Classes Specially
Adapted to Production of Eggr
and Meat.
There
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
There is no best breed of poultry.
Thut, at least, is the opinion of men
in the United States Department of
Agriculture who have been studying
the business for years, and have bad
experience with all varieties of all
breeds in America.
friends and ask for advice about
To go among
your
the kind of chickens to start with
would be about as productive of con
flicting views as if you asked for help
In buying a motor car or a typewriter.
Every man 1ms bis likings, and some
have good reasons for them, but In the
end the beginner will have to be the
Judge; wherefore the opinion of the
department specialists will be about
the best guide: Keep only one vari
ety of breed, and select the breed
that suits your purpose best. >Be sure
of one thing—have a stnndardbred
male at the head of the flock.
These are the reasons: Standard
bred fowls produce uniform products
which bring higher prices.
Standnrdbred stock and eggs sold
for breeding purposes, bring higher
prices than market quotations.
Stnndardbred fowls can be exhlblt
ed, and thus compete for prizes.
Eggs and stock from mongrel fowls
are not sold for breeding purposes.
Mongrel fowls are not exhibited In
poultry shows or expositions.
General-purpose breeds are best
suited to most farms where the pro
duction of both eggs and meat is de
sired. The four most popular repre
sentatives of this class are the Ply
mouth Rock, Wyandotte, Orpington,
and Rhode Island Red.
All these breeds, with the exception
of the Orpington, are of American or
igin.' They are characterized by hav
ing yellow skin and legs, and lay
brown-shelled eggs. The Orpington Is
of English origin, has a white skin,
and nli',. lays brown-shelled eggs. You
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A Flock of White Plymouth Rocks— A
Good General-Purpose Breed.
I can get a detailed description of nli
; fowls of American origin In Farmers'
j Bulletin 8(X5 ou "Standard Varieties of
j Chickens.
I. The American Class,"
I which may be had upon application
to the Division of Publications, United
Stutes Department of Agriculture.
i
The Mediterranean or egg breeds
are best suited for the production of
( white-shelled eggs. Ilepresentatlves of
this class ure bred largely for eggs
rather (bar for meat. Among the
1 popular breeds are Leghorn, Minorca
Ancona rnd Andalusiun
An outstanding characteristic of the
e Kg breeds is the fact Umt thev
classed as nonsitters; that is '
'bey do not become broodv and
hatch their eggs.
t .| ass are kept, artificial incubation
and brooding îisualTy are enq oved
farmers Bulletin 898, "Standard Vm
rietles of Chickens. II. The Medlter
rlasSi .. tells abou , f|ns ; er
i -shuns Rmlnm,» <• n ' .
! ... «r
are
as a
Wheti fowls of this
meat
ra , ther ^ ^ ' md al '
Î . " . " 8S d for nu ' ul ure som e
times kept us general-purpose fowls.
nm,.,, „n , ,
« bÏÏÜ Z 7 C ST.ÏÏ;
eral-purpose class, and lay brown
shelled eggs.
Fanners' Bulletin 1052,
''Standard Varieties of Chickens. IIL
Aslatie, English, and French Classes'*
.•
, 1 , .
d ' f ' he bree<ls ln thl * class.
Eowls for breeding purposes should
he strong
comb, face, and wattles should be
bright red,
healthy, vigorous birds. The
eyes bright and fairly
prominent, head comparatively broad,
short, and not long or crow-shaped ;
legs set well apart and straight, plu
mage <lean and smooth.
The beginner In poultry will be care
ful to have
home ready for his flock
Farmers' Bulletin
contains suggestions, plans, and
directions every poultry keeper should
h " v, '' The Dlvls,on of Publications
will send it upon request.
before he gets It.
8W
of Hlhblng, the town founded bv tin
late Henrv VV Oliver ,
and then was Instructed
town on the
•>f Pittsburgh.
J to "put that
move and keep it on the
move until you have It a mile nw a v"—
and there were no further mstn.c
'' instrtic
tlons.
And now Hibbing is to be
the move." When settled dow
new Site. It Is to be known
llibblng.''
put on
n on Its
ns "New
Gladness always
seek It among the
comes to those who
real things of Ufa.
GOOD
ROADS
FIND ASPHALT BY ACCIDENT
Discovered in Switzerland and Ueed
for Purpose of Extracting Valu
able Bitumen.
Asphalt, though covering thousand»
of miles of roads in all countries, was
discovered quite by accident,
middle of the last century It was
found in Switzerland In its natural
state, and used for the purpose of ex
tracting the valuable atoro of bitumen
It contained. In time it was noticed
that pieces of rock which fell from
the wagons, and were crushed by the
wheels, formed a very fine road sur
face when half melted by the heat of
the sun.
An experiment was made and a road
of asphalt laid In Paris. It was so
successful that the new road material
became adopted through all the big
towns of Europe.
All sorts of materials have been
tried since, from rubber to seaweed.
It Is very likely, In fact, that In the
future the streets of our big eitle»
will be paved with some form of rub
ber mixture which will bo practically
noiseless. Very extensive experiments
have already been carried ont with
such a mixture.
In New York several streets are
paved with steel, and a steel road has
been In use In Valencia, In Spain, for
the last 20 years. Perhaps the most
cnrious material for a road Is sea
weed. This compressed Into solid
blocks, is used to pave the streets of
Baltimore. These seaweed blocka are
bound with wire and dipped Into boil
ing tar before being put to use.
In the
DESTROY ROADSIDE WEEDS
Because—
1. They act as centers of weed In
festation for adjoining fields.
2. They may be carried for many
miles by passing vehicles and animals.
3. They harbor harmful Insects and
plant diseases.
4. They create Insanitary conditions.
5. They are unsightly.
Methods for destroying roadside
weeds, approved by specialists of the
«im
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Weeds Along Roadside Harbor Injuri
ous Insects and Various Plant Dis
eases.
United States Department of Agrt
culture, are:
By
1. Mowing twice a year while they
are In full bloom, usually in June and
August.
2. Utilizing the roadsides for
Ing hay.
3. Grazing with tethered animals.
-1. Converting weedy roadsides Into
lawns.
GRADE ALL ROADSIDES SO THE
WEEDS CAN BE CONTROLLED.
grow
WIRE MESH GOOD FOR ROADS
British Army in Egypt Used Chicken.
Wire In Building Temporary
Routes In Sand.
The British
army In Egypt has
used chicken-wire in the construction
of roads.
Loose sand was smoothed and lev
eled and then covered with chicken
wire, which was firmly pegged down.
The passage of troops
transports seemed to uffect the road
very little, while the passage of ani
mal-drawn vehicles damaged the Im
provised road badly. However, it was
possible to make repairs quickly and
the road was eusiiy kept In good
dition.
Of course this wlre-mesh road
purely a temporary expedient for the
military.
the palm os the champion road-mak
ers of the world. Many a foundation
of the roads they made Is still in
In Europe, the surface alone being
modern.
or motor
con
was
The old Homans still hold
use
Bad Roads in Way.
The planter—the farmer—needs to
reduce the cost of transportation; the
laborer to provide homes and cheaper
living; the merchant wants the coun
try air.
What opposes? Hoads—bad
roads.—Dr. Seaman A. Knapp.
Line Highways With Tree».
Now Is a fine time to make plans
for lining the highways In
ship with trees,
too thick; fifty feet
will do.
your town
Don't plant them
or more apart
as
INES5 DIRECTORY
when mnswerlng these ladvertlsemcnts
Mention your home paper
Mention your
INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
A Il&udy Spokane Business and
Professional Directory.
Kirk hart Auction Co.. N711 Monroe.
AUTO TOP REPAIRING
I'ir'Amn Ton «•». Slow'. 2.1. l'Uo.Kiv.44lL
BATTERY AND ELECTRICAL SERVICE
\nrih went Storage B attery. 1106 W. let.
him Pire Elec tric Service, 2d and Cedar.
CORRECT GLASSES
; IK. HENDRICKS, 507 Hiv. Av. M. «»7.
FL OOR AN D WAL L TILE
JCMIMKB TÏLB ft MANTEL CO.. Spokane
- FL ORISTS _ __
Write, phone or wire your florul wants
to Eugene's Flower Shop. 20 Wall street.
HAY AND GRAIN DEALERS
CENTRAL. HAY ft GRAIN CO- Spokan e.
H OGS, VEAL AND PO ULT RY BU YERS
jvh.S LE WIS MARKETS. SPOKANK.
"HOTELS
Handy to business center, Slliman
Hotel, 3rd and Monroe, Spokane : _
ICE MACHINES _ __
t he FRICK ICE MACHINE, Cooper Ice
Mach I ne ft Pl um hing Co., 1104 N . Monroe.
Harris Ice Mch. 11. Ci. filier Co., Spokane.
Armstrong Machinery Co., Spokane,_Win
LlVEjTÖCK AND P OULTRY B O UGHT
/.ett ft Thompson. M ax, 739. 1616 Bridge.
"MFG7 JEWELER ft WATCH MAKER
REPAIRS. A. Brogger, 391-2 Rookery Bdg.
PATENTS AND~YRA0EMA RKS
l„ L. Westfall. 912 Paulsen Bldg.
PURE CANE AND MAPLE SYRU P
Pure maple sugar. Friable. Sill MadlBon
RUBBER STAMPS AND SEALS
nAClFlC'STAMP WORKS. SU Spra<ue.
SHEET METAL WORKERS
A heeler Sheet Metal VV'ka, 9 Riverside.
STEAMSHIP TICKE TS ___
vsaoc. steamship Office, 211) Hyde jUdf.
» I ÈAM-TURK — SOAP LAKE BATH8
Seville's lor rheumatism. 31ä W. Sprague.
WANTED TO BUY—POULTRY
i nland Poultry House. 713 N . Monroe.
WINQ6HIE LP8. VIS ORS—CUT QLAS8
Spokane Cut Class cio., W27 Riverside.
AUTO TOPS AND BODIE8
u.and Autu Top Factory, 8. 211 Monroe
at. Recovering, upholstering, repairing.
Reeder, Automobile Trimmer ft Ml«r.
vll repairing In my line. 1206 3d Ave.
MACHINE SHOPS AND MACHINERY
Cylinder Grinding a specialty. Oversize
Platons fitted. Parts made for all cars.
Crescent Machine Works, 315 N. M onroe .
TRACTOR and AUTO CYLINDERS re
ground, Platons fitted like new. CEN
TRAL MACH1NB WKS., 930 N. Howard.
UNION' IRON WORKS, .Spokane, Wash.
Pumps, Pipe, Boilers, Engines, etc.
western Mach'y ft Èqpt. Co. —Machines
sale or rent. _SB Steyeiis St. M. 5539._
Machine work of any kind la done by
Pacific Iron Works. Spokane.
MONUMENTS
Rest stock of Granite and Marble Moiiu
unfits.
Lowest prices. Inland Monumenl
1 Co N 10111 Monroe. Spokane. Wash.
SPOKANE MONUMENTAL CO.
Leading dealers in all Eastern
and Foreign Granite and Mar
ble Monuments.
1'rlccs by Mail.
808 W. Trent Ave., Cor. Post.
4JUAXIT YMKMOIUALS
Washington Monumental Co.
Established 1HU6. 1508-1530 W. 2nd Ave.
PLATING AND^STOVE^REPAlRb^
Tîurir'TïYEÏf^^^ iooy^Tst.
Plati ng, reti nning milk can s, stove repairs
ST ORAGE" ANDT RAN b FER^
.aturage. TransferT^Country Hauling. SEÈ
HORN STORAGE & TFR CO.. S161 Line.
Designs and
Large Stock.
NEW TODAY
B U I^LD^NG^SUPPLdE S
WALL HOARD—WRITE FOR SAMPLES
of WASHINGTON PLASTER WALL
HOARD. Won't burn, won't warp. Man
ufactured by the Washington Huilding
Products Co., GS51 K. Marginal Way,
Seattle. Wash.
FARM AND LOGGING HARNESS
og todav Pioree Harness Co.. Spokane.
FOR SALE—HONEY
YORK'S
HONEY
WESTERN
BLOSSOM
Purity guaranteed. By mail or otberwiae. Call
(or write) for circular and price«. YORK
HONEY CO..:») W Main Avc .Spokan-.Wa»h.
HELP WANTED—GENERAL
UKAIIN TEBKGRAPHY at the largest
TKGKGRAPH SCHOOL, In the north
PACIFIC TKLKGRAPH INSTITUTE,
__Spokane, VVash.
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN FOR MO
Educational
and ambition essential. Experience un
necessary. We teach you. Apply Air.
Jackson, Pan-American Film Corpora
tion, Spokane. Wash.
HOTELS
tion picture production.
WHITE S HOTEL AND RESTAURANT;
room« 76c and up; hot and cold water
in rooms; $4 and up by the week; good
restaurant In connection. Corner of
Stevena a nd Sprague, Spokane, Wash
__M EATS— F I S H—POULTRY "
Home of good «aunage. Wholesale and
retail. Pacific Market. 43 Riverside.
MISCELLANEOUS—FOR SALE ~
If you use
Extracted Honey.SWEET APPLE
Cl DER, Cider Vinegar or Fancy
Apples, write C. C. Stinger, 1722
E. Spraff ue Av., Spokane. Fanner, Producer
and Manofacturer.
_ PIPELESS FURNACiS
Find Out About the Ldfesaver. H. A.
St <• nkc Furnace Co., N1718 Division.
POU LTRY AND POULTRY 8UPPLH8
mîTcolac conISénbku' SuttïTr
MILK is pure creamery buttermilk con
densed to a thick paate. The ideal food
for laying hens and baby chlx. Write tor
circular and price. Commercial Creamery
Co.. Spokane. Wash. _
TIMELY REAL ESTATE OFFERINGS
IRRIGATED LAND
3000 ACRES ADJOINING TOWN OF
Kamloops, B, C. All under Irrigation,
being sold in 10-acre lots. No clear
ing. Brices range from $250 per acre
to $1000. The high priced land Is or
chard bearing and showed net return
last year of $360 per acre.
Cheap Land In Central fl. C
RATTENBURY LANDS, LTD.,
Metropolitan Bld g., V ancouver. B. C.
FOR SALE OR TRADE
4S0 acres Alberta wheat land, all In
cultivation or can be, $15,000. will trade
tor stuck of merchandise If priced right
On right deal will also pul In Palouso
land to $25,000 . Box "It." Kendrick. Ida
__ USED CAR -
an unubuÂîT' Offering' 'in 'k
practically new ACE touring
turned on account of
contract,
tion.
ear; re
, . non-payment of
...... _ w rite for further Informa
426 Rookery Bldg., Spokane.
WANTED
POULTRY—EGGS—VEAL—PORK
Cash Buyers
Established Fifteen Years.
Weekly Price Current on Request.
A. C. FRY ft CQ., Seattle, Wash.
WEEDING- ACETYLENE
Modern Welding Wk«.. W 1112 Sprague.
LIVE POULTRY WANTED
Shi
l?ogs° Ur llve Poultry, dressed veal
and
COMMERCIAL CREAMERY COMPANY
Spokane, Waeh.
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT
^FACE^AND^JHAm^SPECIAUSTS.
'Tîîéctroîyslapimple8r«caîp w ~vvorkp7SrJ
bleaching, switches from combings and
first duality cut hair. Wolcott ft Sinks
1 21 Rookery Bldg,. Spokane ._
INFANTS' WEAR AND NEEDLECRAFT
'riÎB^BBIHvB^CKAFTTïopTTNF'ANTÎr
wear, stamped and fancy goods. 3rd
floor Norfolk bldg., 816^4 Riverside
FEATHER WORK
JtÊÊk. MADAME MAJER
Hyde Building,
styles pleating, but'-'
VV tons, braiding. he m -
stitching, etc.
TEÂCHER8' AGENCIES
Teachers for H. 8. Science Needed. Al
bert Teachers' Agency, 202 Peyton bldg.
All
SCHOOLS TO HOLD OPEN HOUSE
December 4 to 10 to Show Work Done,
Needs of System.
"Education week," December 4 to
10, which Is toeing recommended
jointly by the National Educational
Association and the American legion,
will be observed in all public schools
of the Northwest. The same
week
will be made an "open school week."
"The purpose of 'Education
is to inform the public of the accom
plishments and needs of public
schools and to secure the support of
the public in meeting these needs,"
said Mr. Pratt, superintendent of the
Spokane city schools,
week" will be held
week'
"Open school
to encourage
school visitation by the parents and
others. During the week principals
will welcome visitors, explain the
methods in use and show the pupils
at work.
"Do you play any instrument now,"
asked Mr. Brown of an old school
the other day.
was the reply, "second fid
friend on meeting,
"Yes,'
die at home."
Now Is the time for all good ships
to sink for the aid of their country.
A PHOTOGRAPH
—which really does one's
self justice and of such
artistic interpretations as
to compel the admiration
of friends ia the kind we
produce. Specials, VM
to 312 per dozen.
Angvire Studio
Fernwell building
, Spokane'tt
Leading Photographer
$5 Per Month Buys
TYPEWRITER BARGAINS
ANY MAKE
Send for Prie Schedule.
Sat Infliction Guaranteed.
Repairs, Supplies. Rontals.
CORONA TYPEWRITER SALES CO.
14 N. Howard Spokane, Wash.
TURN COLD
TO GOLD
With my Ice
molds you can
make all the ice
you want right In
your own yard.
Write for informa
tion and prices.
WARREN LATHAM. Mnfra.
Spokane. Wawh._
I LATHAMS j
1 ICC MOLD . j
OAT SPROUTERS
THE RELIABLE AND THE
SECTIONAL SUCCESSFUL
Both Standard Sprouters.
in our Fall Catalog.
Described
The Inland Seed Company
House of Good Seeds
Spokane
AUDITS COSTS
SYSTEMS
LANE. BELL ft GILL
Public Accountants
Federal Tax Advlaora
Empire State Bldg., Spokane, Waeh.
ELECTRIC
WE SELL, INSTALL AND REPAIR
Farm Lighting Planta. Motora, Generators,
Lamps, Washers, Etc. EDISON BATTER
IES will work on any electric plant ; last 20
years. Lead plate batteries and parta for
all FARM ELECTRIC PLANTS.
NIXON-KIMMELL CO.
8. 167 Wall 8t.
Spokane. Wash.
PILES
Flstula, Fissure, Itching and all
other rectal conditions, except Cancer
permanently cured without surgery. '
„If* " lethod of treatment saves the
tlBHue Instead of destroying It. It is
painless, requires no anesthetic and is
P, er K 1 ^i nent ' , ThBre ls no confinement
to bed no Interference with buslnss
or social engagements.
Call or write for booklet,
this paper when writing.
DR. C. J. DEAN
Second and Morrison 8ts.. Portland, Or
Mention
And How to Feed.
Mailed free to
AMERICA'S
PIONEER
DOG
address by the author.
H. Clay Glover Co., Ii*c.
118 West 31st St.
New York, U. 8. A.
REMEDIES
TREES
SHRUBS
AND
tSFwfcÄ&sst
■ v "ï simili«. B,*«.
- 1 • CirrWr.M „ Hhl "l" Tiw».
*90 Plia. bullitioilQU fuiriulMd.
washwqton nursery

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