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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, December 30, 1921, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1921-12-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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11
INSIST ON ABROGA
OF TREATIES RESULT
ING FROM 21 DEMANDS.
oelegates
tion
IECT! SAY THE JAPANESE
Reluctant to Go Into Va
-Deadlock
lipponese
lidity of Old Treatiei
booms Over Other Compli
cations, Also.
. 1
WASHINGTON, D. C.— With the
Lantung negotiations already at a
jeiicate stage Chinese delegates threw
, new element of controversy into
pe Far Eastern negotiations hy ask
* ng that the treaties resulting from the
amotis 21 demands be abrogated.
The Japanese immediately objected
o consideration of the subject and
he Far Eastern committee adjourned,
jefore another meeting Is held all na
ional delegations will prepare to
jve an opinion on whether the Chi
iese proposal can properly be taken
p under the conference agenda.
Meantime all delegation spokesmen
(except the Chinese are declining to
iscuss the subject.
In the view of the Chinese repre
(tentatives the subject actually is be
ore the conference and must be dis
missed and disposed of.
Further complicating the negotia
(ions, China also asked the powers to
■make a definite declaration abolish
ling all the claims to "spheres of in
luence" which have been made under
ieveral treaties with China.
I
I
I
GERMANS AFTER
CHANGE IN TERMS
Would Make Payments to Allies in
Dyes, Chemicals Instead
of Gold.
I BERLIN.—Return of Dr. Walter
Diathenau to the post of minister of
reconstruction in the near future is
predicted as a result of the negotia
Itions in ivondon. These conferences
lare viewed here as complementing
recent visits to London of Hugo
fctinnes, director of the General Elec
tric company. Banker Rothschild and
Bather financiers and industrialists,
»•hose personal efforts are expected
■o result in a radical reversal of the
(policy of the allies on reparations.
I i)r. Rathenau is supposed to be act
ing in the interest of the Wirth gov
ernment in an effort to prepare pay
ments in kind as a substitute for the
gold installments for reparations
'which Germany has been obliged to
pay at the expense of currency infla
tion. It is hoped by Dr. Rathenau to
persuade the allies to permit Germany
to make the major part of her obliga
tory payments in chemicals, dyes, pot
ash and other commodities, and pos
sibly, ultimately, an agreement similar
to the Wiesbaden agreement.
I Advices received here from London
[report that Dr. Ratlienau's mission is
»meeting encouragement.
TO AID LIVE STOCK MEN
'Loan Companies Will Be Organized
if Banks Fail to Finance Farmer.
CHICAGO.—If financial institutions
such as local bank or state trust com
t panics refuse or fail to finance the
former under the plans of the war
finance corporation, or If there be red
tape or delay, cattle loan companies
or other institutions will bo organized
to meet the need of the corn belt
live stock men.
The committee in its report called
tlie attention of bankers to the fact
that they can rediscount with cor
poration-approved notes of respon
sible farmers.
Their attention was also called to
tlie fact they are under obligations
worthy and responsible
farmers who are In need of money.
Farmers are advised that the war
finance
to servo
corporation wishos to make
lonnH to the farmers, but tliut th«>
loans must lie made through banks|
or other organizations. Tho commit
tee expressed Its desiro to operate
through existing agencies, hut stated
its intention of providing relief fori
the farmer if tho present agencies do
not I unction and It beconu's necessary
to organize now ones.
$1.000,000 A8 LOVE BALM
Womsn Sues Heiress for Alienation
of Husband in N. Y.
NEW YORK.—Through the urrest
"f John O. Oldmlxon. n lawyer, on
a charge of extortion, It became know n
that Mrs. Amy Crocker Gouraud, for
merly 1'rlncoBB Miskinoff, was defend
ant in a $1,000,000 alienation suit
brought hy Mrs. Elisabeth Bchlll. wife
of Bruno Schill, former purchasing
agent for tho Esthonlan republic. Mrs.
Gourard Is the daughter of tho late
Edwin Bryant Croaker, California mil
lionaire, und has been four times mar
ried. She inherited u fortune and Is
prominent socially. Oldmlxon, who Is
Mrs. Oourard's attorney, was arrested
on complaint of Mrs. Sehill.
Missing Banker Looated.
DULUTH. Minn.—Charles B. Hoel,
Kveleth banker, who disappeared Sep
tember 7 last, and who was believed
to have drowned In Eaquagema lake,
was Identified FWday In N6w York
city when he applied for a passport
to South America under the name of
Carl Bernard Hall.
IDAHO NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Recent Happenings in This State
Given in Brief Items for
Busy Readers.
Mrs. J. A. Arnot Succumbs.
TROY.-Mrs. James A. Arnot, lot
30 years a resident of this
11 .v, died recently.
Idaho Farmer Kills Self.
SA NDPOlNT.—Frank Pish, age 40,
killed himself witli an automatic
volver at his ranch near Dorlte, three
miles west of Cabinet and about BO
miles east of here,
dent over ill health.
commun
re
d'i
He was despon
land
ful
Favors Panhandle State.
SANDPOINT.—At a
•«cent lunch
eon of the chamber of commerce T.
Huntbird, head of the Humbird
lumber industries, spoke in favor of
the creation of a new state out of a
pari, of north Idaho and a part of
Washington.
. 1 .
for
»t
C. Midstater Slain at House Steps.
Following tt quarrel at
the lunch table Stathes Actipis, age
32, tt Greek mined, shot and killed
Earl Midstater, age 31, a painter and
paper hanger, _ on the steps of the
hoarding house. The bullet entered
Midstuter's neck, severing the carotid
artery and the spinal cord. Actlpls
fled to the surrounding hills, but was
captured soon after the shooting.
Believe Two Men Drowned.
COEUR D'ALENE, it is virtually
conceded hy friends that Charles
Pearson and John Headmurk, resi
Rock-ford Point, Coeur
perished when their
while rowing
across Windy hay to Aniwaco. The
oars and one of tile men's hats were
found floating in the lake near Aui
waco.
KELLOGG.
dents of
d'Alene lake,
boat was swam/ped
State Would Oust Mexicans.
BOISE.—Possibility of reducing the
number of unemployed Idaho work
men hy 1,000 or 1.500 at one stroke
was discussed at a recent meeting
here of state, city and American
legion officials. The movement con
templated is the return of all Mexi
can laborers who agree to the ar
rangement, to Mexico. Tlie Mexican
consul in Boise, Miguel Angel Rico,
is assisting in the movement.
Idaho U. S. Attorney Quits.
BOISE.—■Coincident with the an
nouncement from Washington that
President Harding had nominated
Colonel E- G. Davis of Boise for
United States district attorney for
the district of Idaho it was announc
ed here that United States District
Attorney J. L. McClear telegraphed
his resignation to Washington, to take
effect as soon as his successor can
be appointed. Fred E. Crane, an at
torney of Coeur d'Alene, is being
prominently mentioned for tlie post
of assistant to Colonel Davis.
Will Not Hang.
BOISE.-—Vincente Ramirez, convict
ed of murder in Madison county in
1918, and who 'has had a number of
respite« while under sentence of
death, will not be hanged, hut will
serve the remainder of his days in
the venltentiary. The Idaho supreme
court has handed down an opinion in
which it held that it had power to
recall the remittitur handed down in
the case some time ago. and also
that it 'had power to modify, the
sentence from the death penalty to
that of life imprisonment at hard
labor.
is
to
to
is
Federal Mines Improve.
The earnings of the Federal Min
ing and Smelting company are im
proving, according to a New York re
port. For tlie three months ended on
October 31, 1921, the excess of re
ceipts over expenditures was $192,481.
Tills is comparable with receipts of
$176,034 In the last preceding quarter
and of $210.218 n the October quarter
of 1920. These figures take no ac
count of depreciation or of ore «le
pletion. The Federal Mining and
Smelting company is operating the
Morning mine and mill at Mullati and
the Independence mine and mill, near
Halley, from both of which ore is lu*
Ing produced on an Important seal«'.
the
red
to
war
Culdesac Bank Robbed.
OULDESAC — The First Bank of
Culdesac, one of the Vollmer string
i of banks, was robbed recently
th«> j yegginen. who g«it $800 In silver,
watch and a few other articles
trance was made through a side door,
and a pair of pliers was used to turn
I the key, which was on tlie inside
fori Tho door in tho large
do open with heavy tools Dm evidently
the robber* did not have tho proper
equipment to blow the door on the
motley box Inside the main vault
Safety deposit boxes and customers'
private boxes were ransacked for
valuables. Of the silver taken, $650
by
u
En
vault was pried
on
n
for
suit
late
mil
Is
Is
was In nb'kuls, dimes and quarters
and $U.O was in dollars and halves.
Two Million Losa Jobless.
WASHINGTON,
throughout the country hns been
greatly relieved In past three months,
us u result of the national conference
on unemployment called by President
Harding, according to a report of the
results obtuined hy the body. Issued
by Its chairman. Secretary Hoover.
At the time of the national conference
It wag estimated 3,300,000 persons
were unemployed, the report said,
while Mr. Hoover believes that 1.G00,
000, and perhaps as many as 2,000,100
men and women, are employed today
who would be out of Jobs were it not
for the work of the conference.
Unemployment
of
Irish Vote January 3.
DUBLIN.—The dail Elreann, 77 to
44. have decided on a motion sub
mitted by Michael Collins, to adjourn
debate on tho Irish treaty until Jan
uary 3.
SUGGESTIONS TO AID
FARM TIMBER OWNERS I
Selling of Product Calls for Good j;
Business Methods.
8
j
Benefit by Experience of Neighbors
and Investigate Local Requirements
and Pricei
Secure Competition.
y.
Advertise and
merry
pared bjr Ilia t'nllcil Slate« Prparlmaat (fy
of Agriculture.)
Based upon methods used hy wood- ]
imagine
d'i
land owners that have been success
ful in marketing their products, the v ' ltl '
forest service of the United States Al
Department of Agriculture offers ttie * eiTJ
enough,
door
following 10 suggest ions for aiding
others who Iihvc timber on the farm i(trowled.
for sale :
Get prices for \ariotis wood prod
ucts from as many sawmills and other
wood jslng plants as possible.
B .'ore selling, consult neighbors
»t j have sold timh*r and benefit from
got
than
traces
require
modnets j»* >
i You
your
their experiences.
Investigate
ment*
titulier
mi'l
Your
price.
fi
¥ 11
"f'-Xy
ties.
girl
; kind
! thing.
though
1
thing?
VAj
• '■
h
9
• î
t
least
!
! of
take
self,
It;
-Vi,
m
n
jfj and

B near
B
B
Bi to
I more
(ejj noon
on
■—J
lie
into
'
j
Black Locust Plantation—i-ive-Year
Old Tree».
may be wortli inure* locally because
transportation is saved.
Advertise in papers and
senne outside coiujietirion.
Secure bids if practicable both hy her
otherwise
up
ndling to re- he
the lump and hy log-scale measure.
Be sure that you are
sponsible purchasers.
Get a reliable estimate
amount and value of Hie
zled
the
material !
i
if
before selling.
Market the higher grades of limber
and use tlie cheaper for farm pur
Remember that standing timber can
wait over a period of low prices with- | out
out rapid deterioration.
poses.
Use a written agreement in selling j
timber, especially if the cutting Is
done by the purchaser.
Additional details concerning Un
profitable marketing of woodland
products are contained in Farmers'
Bulletin 1117, Forestry and Farm In
come, copies of which may be hud
upon request of the division of Publi
cations, United States Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
î
for
*
i
!
, j
, ,
readily from one hog to another when
the animals come In clos«- contact.
Practically all cases of n « *• a ion
«cur from contact with lousy *»l- of
omis and not from Infected premise». | hp
Under reasonably go,«l sanitary eon ( .
Hin! pi cm «s m
to
As a precautionary mensuie. how
ever, and because It Is goo>l sanitary ,
practice, all small inclosures w
have coiitalued lousy hogs should he
cleaned und disinfected before being
The litter
GOOD PREVENTIVE OF VERMIN
of
Should B«
Inclosure»
Small
Cleaned and Disinfected Before
Being Used.
All
Except hi accidental cases, hog lice
»re found only on hogs, and they do
voluntarily leave their natural
the United States Depart*
When seiia
not
host, says
meut of Agriculture,
rated from the animal they live only
The Ui'C pass
two or three days.
d it ions pens, corrals
hlcli have co«inlii«*d lousy hogs ure
not a source <»f danger to hogs free
of
w
from lice.
u
Di«li
j
;
i
TAKE-ALL DISEASE OF WHEAT î
'
j
used for a new lot of hogs,
nud manure should he
the floors cleaned after
woodwork amt floors should he sprayed
with u good disinfectant. The coal
tar-creosote dips, diluted In accordance
with Instructions on the container, ure
emoved and
which Ute
suitable for lids purpose.
Department of Agriculture Has Found
Thlrty-Nino Varieties Immune
to Ailment.
Efforts hy the Untied States Depart
ment of Agriculture to combat the so
culled take-all disease of wheat In Illi
nois and Indiana have resulted In find
ing 30 varieties that are 'either Im
mune or highly resistant to the dis
ease.
Cur roll, Dletx, Longberry, Early May,
Fulcaster, Fultz. Gipsy, Gladden, Gold
Coin, Grundprlze, Harvest King. Hun
garian, Jones Fife, Kanred, Kharkof,
Leap, Malakof, Mammoth Red. Mich
igan Amber, Mediterranean. Minnesota
Reliable, Nigger Pesterboden, Poole,
Portage. Pride of Indiana. Red Cross
(red chaff), Red Rock, Red Wave, R«'
liable, Rudy. Stoner (Marvelous!
Trumbull, Turkey, and Wheedling.
They are Belogllna, Crimean.
to
I
I now,
I began
thill
Ten Dollars or a
Night in Jail
illl
J
lift
j;
it
S
8
I I
j By R. RAY BAKER.
I A
i «-aught
y. 1**1. b> McClure Newspaper Syndicate.
I side
lietly Clark's red lips parted and a j
merry luugh pealed from her tliroat. ,
"Excuse me for laughing, .lorry, but |
(fy really IUIIUV
J • *,
] " b 1 oposul ol marriage 1
imagine it? But it's true.
"Slop,
Jerry liolmes mak- | ,,; r |
Can you I
i heard it )
■yes,
] road.
«Idle ered
v ' ltl ' m > own ears. Oh, dear!"
Al "* again Betty laughed.
* eiTJ looked glum und crestfallen.
"What's
I
so funny about It? he
"Haven't 1 known you long
enough, Betty? Haven't we lived next
door io euch other all our lives? Who's
i(trowled.
got a belter right to propose to you
than 1?"
She became more solemn, although
traces uf a smile remained on her at
tractive, rather pert countenance. t
""*0, H's so tooltsh, Jerry. Think | tion."
j»* > ou . Jerry, looking out for a wife; |
i You who never did a day's work in
your life, who have no re-ponsiblll- n«.f.
"I'm
my
is
tie
date
ties.
Jerry, you're not the kiud n
girl wants to marry—at least, not my
; kind of girl.
! thing.
though they won't admit it. Can you
1 picture yourself making me do some
thing?
You're too easy, for one
Most girls like to be bossed,
No, of course you can't. At
least 1 can't, and if 1 could 1 might
! picture myself marrying you. I'm fond
! of you, 1 admit. Dut I can't take your
proposal seriously, because I can't
take you seriously. You don't your
self, so how cun 1? No, Jerry, forget
It; it can never he."
It's
fic
Jerry picked up ltis tennis racket ]
car
and walked slowly away, scowling
fiercely ut Betty's big roadster resting
near the porcli of lier home. He was
alwuys beaten—at everything he un
dertook. When he tried to take Betty
to Mrs. Longworthy's ball he was
beaten by Henry Twite, who hud a
I more commanding way. This after
noon he was beaten by Betty herself
on the tennis court, and now he was
beaten for sure in the game of love,
lie went to li is room, bunged his racket
into a closet and thing himself discon
solately on the bed.
the
his
I
her and he a hero.
He was discouraged, and at tlie
same time he was desperate,
thought of hiring u gang of thugs to
kidnap Betty, just so lie could rescue
He
His brnin framed
up other wild schemes, all of which
he abandoned. He terminated his fren
zled conjecturing by arriving at the
(determination to get a job and go to
! work and prove himself worthy. He
i had In mind no particular job ; the
first one tlint huppened nlong would
satisfy.
Down into the city went Jerry.
Leaving his cur In n garage, he started
| out Job hunting,
wandering rather
aimlessly. He huppened by a police
j station at a time when a file of blue
Is
In
of
î
coats was coming out, and It made him
stop and think.
"That's a good chance," lie told him
self. "Why not he n policeman? Per
haps It would make me more com
manding. It's worth a trial, anyway."
Into the police station he went,
found the captain In charge and usked
for a job.
The captain smiled rnther perplex
* edly at the good-looking, well-dressed,
rather large youth.
"A job, eh? Weil, we need men. Can
you manage a motorcycle?"
i Jerry nodded vigorously. A tnotor
! cycle was one of the few tilings he
ever had been able to manage.
"Well, we'll give you n trial."
Jerry went through the formalities
necessary to become a guardian of the
law, was «-quipped with a four-cylin
der racing motorcycle, and In due
, j course of time was sent out to Cran
dall park to patrol tho boulevards In
quest of speeders. He felt misgivings
, >ut nlce bllIP sult Im .
|mrttH , „ Pprtllll , ,|,. K1W ,,f confidence.
ion j| p s j O0( j f or (| nl0 | n t bp shade
*»l- of „ hlK tm> meditated. While
| hp stood then> ut , hro ,, , )1(r m(1 .
( . hllu>s whl7 . EW , by> BO | ng Wat forty
«s m || pa ||n bollr< And he was supposed
to enteh these demons. Well, he
couldn't perform his duty hy standing
there, so In started the engine of his
motorcyd«*, mounted, let In the clutch
, nmJ stnr(p( | down the boulevard,
he

do
ure
free
The Jpb was not exactly to his lik
ing. In order to make arrests he
j would have to nppoar stern, even pug
nuclous. And that went against Jer
ry's grain.
As he neared a curve In the drive he
heurd a car coining, with the cut-out
open. He knew It was u speeder by
the sound. He supposed he would
have to make an arrest, and yet he
; dreaded it,
i Around the corner came the auto
î und plunged straight at him. Ue
' swerved his cycle and the speeding
j machine missed hint by an inch. Then
Jerry became angry, probably for the
first time In his life. If he hudu't
been quick he would have been a dead
policeman now.
He turned about and gave clmse. The
motorcar was fur along the boulevard I
ure
and
Ute
so
Illi
find
Im
dis
May,
Gold
Hun
Mich
Cross
R«'
Pleased at O'owout.
Yuba City, Cul.—Ted O'Connor of
San Francisco Is hailed here as the
only nutolst In the wor'.d who lias
found genuine pleasure in a blowout.
While on u motoring trip with fils
wife through the Yuba county hills a
tire blew out nnd he dismounted to
fix It, using appropriate language.
While kicking and storming around
(he wheel he picked up u gold nugget
that weighed In at SIS value.
A grass widow lias no use for
eeds.
I now, Inn .lin j opmi
I began to «inn.
i'd tin- llitoltle nml
■mly lit* rouUl s»n*
thill lU*
;is hokiiim I,is
i. ami tu
■ w
Sp«-eil.'IIKI, : IV«is|iT. • I I
•t> tiv. mile
Ilf mi ll n
-i'll II..' ..1 I.)
illl
mill'.
lift \. Hu ll
mill tinnlly sixty.
lit ■> li 1
it
i- Inst :i
nloiiiobilc, luit tin- hi*
torcj.li- w:
le J«itj
s lii'.ur. nml in
short
I hi*
I. »:iiri~i • I •*
I I
■ •ame
'll'
Siccilcr.
I A Kiri was driving. laughing. but .'■lie
gUlllpSC III' llltlc out uf tile
expression
i «-aught :i
I side
Of lier eye
lie
mid
a j
,
|
bunged.
"Stop:"
peaceful Jerry.
loured
lie
in tlie name of the law !"
The
"Slop,
| ,,; r |
I
it )
stopped, a I loll bled took in tier
■yes, and drew up to tin* side of the
] road. Jerry did likewise, und as he
Ids iiiaeliine lie discot
ered that the girl was Betty.
ed
I stepped fron
he said
"Your«
gruffly,
station,"
Betty
wildly.
"Why—why—it can't he Jerry!" she
exclaimed.
arrest,"
under
"I'll have to take you to the
rather
vus staring at him
at
t you're
| tion."
| "Yes, it is Jerry," the girl nn
in nounced, amazed, but with evident re
n«.f. -j KUes8 vou mus t he Joking.
Where did you get those duds?"
"Never mind,'' he said pompously.
"I'm an officer of the law and you're
my prisoner."
"I gness not," she laughed,
is too ridiculous for words. But 1 must
tie hurrying along, Jerry,
date with father, and I'm late."
made as though to start the oar.
"No matter who it is," he growled.
"You're arrested for speeding and
lining with me
tile
sta
tu
n
my
•'Tills
At
1 have a
She
Jerry held up his hand.
"I'm not fooling, Betty. You're ar
rested, and that's nil there is to it.
It's no Joke. You've broken tlie traf
fic law, and it won't go with me. Come
] along to the station."
And they went, Betty driving the
car and Jerry keeping beside her.
Her case was quickly disposed of.
"Ten dollars or a night in jail," said
was
un
was
a
was
love,
the judge.
Betty began to weep and Jerry felt
Ills courage waning. But he thrust
his sympathy rudely aside.
"I—1 haven't any money with me."
Betty pleaded. "Will you pay my
fine! Jerry?"
"Not much," he said sternly,
the lockup for you."
lie winked at the Judge. The judge
had some humor in ills makeup and he
seemed to sense the real situation.
"Officer, look her up," lie ordered.
Jerry led lier away, down a corri
dor lined with barred doors. He
stopped at one.
"nils will he yours." he sni i.
"But. Jerry," she wailed, "surely yea
wouldn't do tills terrible tiling."
"Well," lie replied, with a firmness
he did not feel, "I have to do my duty
I may have been easy once, imt I'm
not so easy now. But I'll pay your
fine, Betty, on one condition, it is tlia>
you marry me."
"And if I refuse—?"
"Then It's all night in a cell." wa*
Jerry's ultimatum.
Betty smiled.
"Jerry, you've done it. You've made
me do something in spile of myself.
Y'ou forced me to accompany you to
the police station, and now—and ;
now—you're forcing me to marry you. i
And it's not so bad after all, because
I've been loving you right along and
was only trying to wake you up hy
what . said."
"It'S
tlie
to
He
which
fren
the
to
He
the
would
Jerry.
started
rather
police
blue
him
him
Per
com
went,
usked
Can
tnotor
he
the
due
Cran
In
Im .
shade
While
m(1 .
forty
he
standing
his
clutch
That Settled It
Daddy was In the habit of going in
to the apartment upstairs to play pok
or every evening. His neighbor, who
something of an Invalid, was un
was
able to visit daddy's apartment with
out great inconvenience. Mother oft
en missed daddy, but Tommy had Fi
do, so he didn't mind It n hit. One
evening mother happened io s«'ii«l Tom
my upstairs to borrow something, and
he found daddy upstairs comfortably
seuted at the table playing p.iker, and
sitting serenely on the arm of his
chair was FUlo. Down came Tommy,
tears streaming down ids little face
- j he blubbered :
dy's got Fido upstairs teaching him to
play poker, and now my doggie will
never want to stay home any morel"
"Oh, mother, dad
os
In the Seventeenth century, juvenile
unlons were of frequent occurrence,
Wards In chancery were sometimes
married at five years of age; nnd
Moll Vllllnrs, «laughter of the first
duke of Buckingham, was not merely
wife hut n widow before she was
nine, and we rentl of her romping In
the garden In her widow's veil. In
almost every instance, however, such
murringes were In name only, and the
little wives were allowed to reach their
teens before taking up the burdens
of wedded life.—London Ttl-Blis.
A Widow at Nine.
lik
he
pug
Jer
he
cut-out
by
would
he
auto
Ue
speeding
Then
the
hudu't
dead
The
a
Even Better.
If you cannot go wherever you
please, you can at any rate try to
please wherever you
Transcript.
go. — Boston

Enter Poverty.
When poverty comes In at the door
love seldom waits for the burglar
KILLS GIRL WHEN HE TIRES OF HER
Three-Year-Old Boy Strangled Play
mate of Same Age When He Be
came Weary of Playing With Her.
Providence, It. L—Mary Szpila,
three >«'ars old, was found strangled
to death on a grindstone in a yard
opposite her Home. Less than a tinlf
hour before she had been playing with
John Bucko, who Is four months old
er. Johnny, it Is said, tied a cord
• BOY
SCOUTS
i£a,

tConuuitt'l hy National Council of the Bor
Scouts of America.)
WHAT SCOUTS FIND TO DO.
In Stoughton, WIs., boy scouts re
moved » large number of rocks and
ottier obstructions from the Lake Ke
gonea camp ground so as to permit
better boating and bathing, to the
better satisfaction of tlie cottagers and
'•anipers concerned.
A Brooklyn (N. Y.) troop gave up i#
much anticipated overnight hike anil
spent their holiday instead painting
and repairing a fence which surround
ed church property.
Honolulu scouts have been support
ing a I reiicb orphan in i'uris fur four
years.
Stratford (Cul.) seouls, among other
activities found time to build a tennis
court, plant trees and make other Im
provements in their local park, helped
the American Legion conduct a city
clean-up, made n point of picking up
the glass or nails they saw In the
streets on tliolr way to school and
troop meetings, collected 1 25 pounds
of old clothing for the Near East re
lief and extinguished a formidable
Are.
Columbus (ft.) scouts have performed
5,000 hours of civic service that every
body kn
probable other 5,000 small, individual
"good turns" which aren't done In the
public eye, but which «tuiul for good
scouting none the loss.
mention the
s about, not t<
EXPERTS ON "FIRST AID."
to
;
i
hy
X
f
When a Scout Is Injured in Camp, Any
of Hi* "Pals" Know Just What to
Do For Him—and Do It.
LEAVES FOR HONOLULU.
in
who
un
James K. Wilder, chief s«'a scout of
the llov Scouts of America, Inventor
of tlie famous I'iue Tree patrol and
oft- g<*»l scout generally, left recently for
Fi- tlie Pacific coast where he will visit
One
and R, id L. L. McDonald, director of the
camping department, In their confcr
and «>« «dth various regional leaders.
Later, Chief Wilder will visit Honolulu.
s and join Doctor
all the sen scout ba
Fisher, deputy chief scout executive.
his
I w here he used to be a scout com
face mlssloner, and which is a flourishing
center of sea scouting. He will lie
to gone about six months,
will
dad
PRINCE SENDS MESSAGE.
The Prince of Wales, who is also
the chief scout of Wales nnd an en
thusiastio supporter of the movement.
sent the following message to Patrol
nnd Leaders Marr nnd Mooney, who were
first chosen for the nntartlc expedition:
was
In
In to go with him in the Quest. Please
such convey to Patrol Leader Murr and
the
their ness' congratulations and tell them
how lucky he thinks they are to have
"His Royal Highness was very In
terested to hear that Sir Ernest
Shackleton has selected two scouts
Patrol Leader Mooney His Royal Hlgh
been chosen for such a trip."
SPEECHES ON FIRE PREVENTION.
you
to
Scouts co-operated all over the
country in the observance of fire pre
vention day, which In many cases was
prolonged to a fire prevention week.
In Utlcn, N. Y'., the scouts were used
to make short addresses to the school
door
■ children on the subject of tire preven
tion.
around his playmate's neck and, fas
tening it to the shaft of the grind
stone. turned its handle until Mary
was dead.
"I didn't like h«'r any more," lie
said, it is asserted, after the deed wub
done.
The authorities decided to tnke no
action, believing that the little hoy did
not realize the crime he had com
mitted. '

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