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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, March 10, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1922-03-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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^Piives J
Ay GRACE
MILLER
WHITE
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Romance of the 5iorm Counlrq
BABY, CAROLINE.'
"MY
cvnrmMis - Lonely and almost
, fri ss ' Tonnibel Devon, living
frte a d anal boat with a brutal fa
,„„ r .,.„1 a worn-out. discouraged
nother wander. Into a Salvation
annyhall at Ithaca, N. Y.
«he meets a young
captain, Philip MarCauley
Devon, Tony's father, returns to
boat from a protracted spree
he has arranged for
worthless com
on
There
Salvation army
Uriah
the
„nd announces
to marry a
of hls, Reginald Brown.
and Uriah
Tony
panion
Mrs.
beats her.
secret
Devon objects,
She Intimates there Is
connected with Tonnibel.
a
and
lier
She
after
could
tried
liope.
friends
ing
paused,
caught
pine
up
by
the
cared
them
she
(lung
a
ward
CHAPTER III.
The Picture of a Baby.
Tniinihcl's heart Jumped almost Into
then seemed to cense bent
stood her father growling,
her thront.
There
,1 and drunk, and as if she were
longer able to help lier
mother lay almost wilhtn
If Uriah carried
Ing.
enrage
dead and no
child. Iter
distance.
m!t < 'his"plans, tlien the horrid fellow
there would soon claim her as ids
That thought frightened lier
woman.
so that she stepped back ns the new
comer came upon the deck.
the matter, Ry?" lie asked
"What's
quite casually.
••He's killed mummy,
And If both you fellers don't
pinched, you'd better
burst forth
the girl.
«•unt m «et
«t offen this hont."
laughed, nnd Reggies high
1'rinli
p/rr-lied cackle followed.
•Been giving your woman a little
discipline, eh, pal?" he demanded,
Devon. "Well, they all
But she's the
saw.
funiinir on
noed it now and then,
liveliest breathing corpse I ever
Did you hit 'er. Dev?"
"Yep," growled the other man, "and
I'm goin' to beat Tony, too. The im
one
I'll
if
. .
she wotiidn t marry
the last man livin'.
pudent brat says
and
mu if you was
You watch the brut there, Rege, while
I duck Ede In the cabin."
Tonnibel, wide-eyed and suffering.
s,,w lier father lift iter mother up in
his brawny arms and carry her down
stairs. none too gently,
disappeared, a throat sound made iter
swing lier eyes to tlie other man. He
s contemplating lier with a smile,
n , vil smile, such ns she hated in
teeth seemed like
est
When he had
w :
His white
in ■ - ii.
many gleaming knives, sharp, strong
and overhanging, his red lips spread
lag away from them.
He took a step toward Iter and
stopped.
"Why so much fuss about nothing,
tny little one?" he said, cooing.
"Haddy said 1 had to marry you,
girl, brushing back a \
"But I j
with my ;
There 1
hn itlied tin
stray curl from her brow.
don't ! I'm goin' to stav
tmother on tbe Dirty Mary,
nip t no law forcing a girl to marry a
! .;m she don't like. And I bate you, I
!
see? Huh?"
"Who spoke of a law?" smiled
I'. un. "I didn't! But I do know, my i
lii He Tony-girl, that you'll say a very
ï -'yes' when I get through with
you."
Tonnibel suddenly shuddered and n
I lieless, helpless feeling went In
waves over lier. Oil, to be anywhere
to God's clear, clean world! Away
from those gleaming lustful eyes! But
«lie saw
Iteglnulil Brown was blocking
t
pportunltv to escape.
the
no
small space through which sin 1 must
fly If sIk>
knew verv well If she could hide for
a little while the two men would drink
'mill they slept,
hack
•ere to lie saved at all. Site
Then she could come
titul help her mother. Plainly
she hail heard the woman weeping be
I""' In the cabin, nnd even more plain
If to her suffering ours entile Devon's
•'lows. an,| after that sib •nee.
Her heart thumped like a hummer
ft lui I list h,,!- a | d e,
shining
Behind her lay the
lake.
And one hasty glance
o'er her shoulder onlv added to her
four
There wits not a sign of a boat
titty where, site was frantic enough to
scream If it would have done her any
good
"I think I'll kiss you. my little bird,"
s »id Reggie, suddenly, narrowing bis
s "You're pretty enough for any
«me t
By Jove. I never
want to kiss.
1 "tillr.etl until todnv lust how nuivh I
liked
you. If l klssetl you. well per
https yeti'd change your mind about
"bout things."
loimlbcl sil<l backward to the boat
rail Wlit'it site touched It, she whirled
about ï. ml dove headlong into the lake
When Itcglnnld Brown saw the girl's
feet disappear under the water, he ut
tered an oath and cried out. He hadn't
expected such an action on her part.
ran to the cabin steps and
screamed to Devon.
"She's tu the lake, Ry," he shivered
ns the other mull sprang to the deck.
When Tonnibel felt the water over
her. she swept to the lake's bottom
with one long stroke. Then deftly she
rid herself of her dress skirt and be
gan to swim swiftly under the water.
They were tense minutes that the
lie
. ... ... , , I I
two men stood waiting, until suddenly
. . .. . 4l .. . . .
beyond them to the south a curly head .
. , .
came above the waters edge. I hen .
 . .
they leapt to the shore and raced to
. ' . . . , , m
wnrd the place she must land. Jo
the panting g rl It was a race for life.
Suddenly, like a flashing glimpse
from Heaven, the words, b and Stil
and See the Salvation of the Lord.
flouted before her eves like a flame of
gold. Philip MacCauley s deep voice
seemed to speak them In her ringing
ears immediately after (.oddy she
groaned^ Su vation of the Lord, oh,
darlm Salvation.
Just then her feet touched the peb
b!es on the bottom of the lake. With
one wild leap «he was on the shore
and up the bank, Wriah screaming at
lier to stop.
She heard the two meu crashing
after her. That her short, swift leaps
could outdistance them for long if she
tried for the boulevard, stie had no
liope. But all about ner were giant
friends with outstretched arms, offer
ing her shelter. For one Instant she
paused, then sprang into the air.
caught the lower branch of a great
pine tree and like a squirrel scurried
up It. Almost at the top, spanned over
by the blue sky, site crawled out to
the end of a big limb and clung to it.
Beneath lier the men paused and
shouted curses up at her. Tonnibel
cared nolliing for curses. She'd beard
them nil her life, used them, too, when
she felt like it.
Suddenly there came to her ears the
tapping of a paddle in the lake. She
(lung up her head, peeped out and saw
a canoe taking Its leisurely way to
ward Ithaca. She bent over and looked
down.
all
the
im
'tliere's some
I'm goin' to
And when he comes,
"Daddy," she cried,
one rowin' on the lake,
holler like h—1.
I'll tell 'lm how you imaged Ede, and
if site's croaked you'll both get jailed.
. . . Here's where I holler!"
Site sent out a quick birdlike trill,
and the man In tlie canoe held Ids
paddle suspended in the
studied the forest.
Tonnibel us much as did th" 'act
in
air as he
Tills didn't inter
est
1T-S
ï*
WsÊm
I
I ing
ï you
! now
CiUj
I poor
!
>3 i
mß.i
hls
\
j
;
1
:
I
I
! /
my
■li
æi -ài I"
i
j
W
//
She Looked at the Picture Curiously.
that Devon and Reggie Brown jumped
their feet and raced away toward
Tonnibel from her
town rd
t
the boulevard.
them disappear
perch
Ithaca
The man In the canoe, too. made hut
before he dipped Ills
On the deck
sn w
before she slid to the ground.
a short pause
paddle and shot away,
of the boat Tonnibel picked up tins
went
dripping wet.
sie Piglet and.
swiftly down the cabin steps,
she found her mother on the bunk, her
husband's
There
by her
discolored
face
blows. She looked its If she were dead,
and for a moment
the wilderness
little cries for help.
the forlorn child of
tittered heartbroken
The cabin was cluttered In the
struggle Uriah Devon Ittltl had with
Ids wife. In despair Tony looked
around. The old clothes daddy bud
hrotytht homo wore strewn over the
cabin floor. Tonnibel heaped them
together, then began to examine them.
They needed nothing hut pressing.
This slic'd do to save her mother the
work; and perhaps the fact that he
had something ready to sell would
make Uriah less brutal when he came
la running her fingers over
to
I
a
back.
coat, searching for small rents, Tony
fdt something between the lining and
outside, a book it seemed like, which
site hastily pulled out.
There wasn't any
ut
she
be
the
It was small
nnd much worn,
money in It, In fact nothing hut a ple
utre, wrapped up in paper.
She looked at the picture curiously.
A baby's face smiled up at her, and
uer own Ups curved a bit In answer to
the laughing challenge In the little
oiio s oyes.
Thon sl»o turncMl lt ovor.
On the hack was written:
"Mv buhy. Caroline
agctl six months. If this picture Is ever
lost the finder will receive a money
wnrd by returning l< 'o Dr. Buiil I'eu
I'endlehaveiK
re
rtlohnvon. IVnfltohnvon Plnre, Tthacn,
N Y."
Money
Money, food and a doctor.
'•ould find tliis Paul Pendlehaven, per
lm)*< in •■M ining for the picture he
would ^i\>- her a holt le of medicine for
her mother.
Hastily changing her wet clothes,
she slipped the hahy's pictured face
into her hlouse, turned down the lamp
and crept from the canal bout sind
with (iussie in her arms was soon lost
in the forest.
vital little needed.
If she
was
$ *
I
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CHAPTER IV.
:
:
The Pendlehavens.
In all of Tompkins county no family
had more prestige than IVndlehavens*.
.John and Paul Pendlehaven hud
chosen medicine and surgery us their
vocation when they were in college.
I I John was a bachelor, and Paul a wid
.. .
. ower. At the time this story opens the
head . .. .......
latter was an invalid, his infirmity
hen . . . . . . u{t ,
. brought about by the death of his
to- ... ....... .. ..
m young wife, who had died at the birth
Jo lllelr dallgUter , antf the «lisappear
life. ançe f , he mtle !r , when she wa s
but old . Pe „dleimven place
Stil ( . on , prisod a whole clty blocU . on wh Ich
stQod a „ alm0Bt a mansion. In tt
of were John, Paul, and Mrs.
voice Curt)s ai)(J hpr tWQ chHd Katherine
, md R lnald Mrs . Curtls wus a sec -
she ond cougln to the pendlehaven broth
oh, ep> and bad made her home wlth them
since her children had been left father
peb- ]ess Mrs Curtls had burle d two hus
With h sllBB Curtis, the father of
shore KaU)erl and Kdmund B rown, the
at fathop of Keginald .
j,, or over a yeur now Paul Pendle
haven had not left his apartments in
leaps sot ,(| ir ,. n wing of the house. Many
she tlmeg hc had told h | s brother, John,
no Ulat he only wa | ted wi th what pa
giant tien ce lie could for the call to go
offer- awav t(( folIow after h is girl-wife, and
she perl ; apR wel i, perhaps his child might
air. now be wlth ) ie r mother,
great ()n tb( , day tbat Uriah Devon re
scurried tnrned {roln ' hls week's bout, Doctor
over Pendlehaven was seated opposite his
to cousln Mrs . Curtis, at dinner,
to it. "Sarah," he began gravely, "1 wisli
and you>d ,.,,,'isent to my taking Reginald
Tonnibel )n baIld f or a time. He will be abso
beard i ut(dy ru ined if something isn't done
when w i tb Idra."
fbe coquettish smile which Mrs.
the Curtis always used in the presence of
She j bf; eminent doctor left her face, and
saw bpr bps drew down at the corners,
to- "What's he done now?" she cried,
looked 4 *j-je isn't going to college at all,"
sa j d tbe doctor. "He won't pass any
of his examinations if he doesn't go to
class and get hls hours in. . .
He paused a moment and then went
Another tiling I dislike to speak
Reginald has no idea
I'm very much
HIS
I
(j
i
some
to
comes,
and
jailed.
on,
of, but 1 must,
of mine nnd tliine.
afrnid lie takes what doesn't belong
trill,
Ids
to ldm."
Mrs. Curtis uttered a squeal.
"Goodness gracious, you accuse him
of stealing," she screamed.
"I'm afraid he does, Sarah" he an
'Oonstantly I'm misa
it will hurt
I swered gently.
I ing money and things.
to know that some one almost
ï you
stripped my wardrobe of clothes, and
! now I find there isn't much left for
Pnul Is very much dis
I suppose if Reginald did
I
I poor Paul.
! tressed!
take them, he thought they were of no
value!
"Were they?" queried Mrs. Curtls.
leaning over
the table, still very
nngry.
"Whether they were or not, Sarah,'
replied Doctor Pendlehaven. Ignoring
hls young cousin's appeal, "they didn't
And they were val
: belong to him.
liable to Paul in that they held some
It hasn't been
thing he prized highly.
7 ha hit to interfere between you and
children, Sarah, hut I do wish
my
your
you'd ask the boy If he did take Paul's
If he's sold them. I'll pay
clothes,
j whatever the amount is."
"How perfectly disgusting," snapped
If the child did sell
I
Mrs. Curtis.
no good.
back ! e
thinking they were
•ertainly not want them
I
them,
you'd
front a second-hand shop."
Doctor Pendlehaven rose from the
ï
rd
taMe.
"Ask hint about the suits. Sarah,
he said, walking toward the
tell hint Paul will
ihxtr.
to
"Perhaps If you
give hlm n
ami the contents of their pockets, lie'll
Ills
hundred dollars for them
look them up.
Mrs
Curtls rose with dignity, her
handkerchief clenched In her
damp
her
hand.
she
I'll not Insult my only son.
said distinctly.
With a gesture of despair, Doctor
Pendlotmvon went out of the room.
moment after he'd gone, and
the sound of hls footsteps had been
lost In tbe corridor, the mother stared
at her daughter.
of
For a
the
with
bud
the
the
he
came
It's ns
she burst out.
"The fact Is,
Cousin John says, 1 haven't much In
over Reggie, but 1 don't be
In n
fluenoo
Have he's as Imd as people say.
little town like this a
person can t
take n step sideways without old wags
commenting on It.
I hate Ithaca for
Just that reason.'
Dr. John has a visitor.
a
Tony
and
which
any
plO UK CONTINUED.)
small
Happiness Not All.
There is tn man a higher than love
of happiness; he can do without hap
piness und Instead thereof find blessed
ness.—Carlyle.
ple
and
to
little
Nervous.
It Is the man of many parts who
should be careful not to go to pieces.—
Cartoons Magasins.
ever
I'eu
Qo on and make errors and fall and
get up again. Only go on.—Auna O.
Brackett.
re
People of Petrograd Must Use Hand Sleds Now
I !
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tt tlng the revolution of 1017.
i ) it ''? —
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Tlds photograph gives an illuminating view of conditions in Petrograd today, where horses are eaten, gasoline Is
scarce'and^handhdeds ^Ire being used to transport freight. In the background Is tbe Bolshevist monument, commemor
Behind It, the winter palace, once the residence of the czar and czarina. ^
tt tlng
HIS PRISONERS LIKE HIM
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Sheriff John A. Kelleher of Boston
is shown with the big silver loving
eup which the prisoners in the Charles
Street jail presented to him in appre
ciation for the benefits lie has pro
vided for them.
WALKED ON DIAMONDS
!
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Literally walking on diamonds was
ï he smuggler who wore these specially
with heels hollowed out
made sheet
admit carrying through the customs |
dice thousands of dollars In diamonds.
eonliseated by Chicago fed
to
1'hey were
oral olUcluls, who captured the smug
large diamonds stolen
fer
tbe
Four
wealthy Russian family
gier,
from a
among the loot recovered.
vere
Law! Wot Do They Understand?"
has recently con
The Sorbonne
erred upon Rudyard Kipling an hon
orary degree of doctor.
•otnpUmeiitary the French critics
to be, and however
And yet, how- i
ever t
continue
may
faithful French readers
lOnjjfllsh-speaklnjî
he has
may prove,
Kipling fan,
glanced at the |
will shake 1
"Law ! Wot do
S'olp me. Boh" Is
Quo Bob m'emporte."
stands," obviously ! I
your
when once
translations Into !• renoh.
ns
In
be
n
his head and murmur,
they understand?"
converted to
"As long ns Jtikk
t
.
for
the mountain by that
is changed in un
reference to
. t
a
Simla.
name near
abandon of patriotism to " I ant que ;
flotteront les couleurs anglaises." The :
fast one upon un- i
divergencies follow
other until the stories all become a |t
mixture of what Kipling wrote, what l|
ritten and what
Kipling might have
Kipling never would have written.
IS
love
hap
Peculiar Currency.
still used us !
|
shells are
, ilie East Indies, Sinnt, and ;
of Africa, at the
Cowdry
money
the west coast
rate of one-two-hundredth of a penny
each. The 'eelh of the sperm whales I
ure used as money in FIJI, the white ;
ones being of greater value than the I
colored variety. while among the I
South Sea islands red feathers and at- ,
tractive kinds of stones puss muster
on
who
and
O.
as currency.
Chinese Shrine in California
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This elaborate and costly Chinese shrine bus been built In the yard of hls
by a. J. Bumheimer, a retired millionaire. The
detail and is ornamented with gold leaf and other
estate at Hollywood, Cal.
shrine is perfect in every
technically correct accoutrements.
!
Agile Firemen of Punta Arenas
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Everv inontli the volunteer lirenum of Punta Arenas. < hi e, are
fer exercise nnd exhibition purposes. Their agility may be likened to' ihuto
tbe feline family, for they have set many records for speedy pole climbing.
called out
Reg'lar Guy
Grand Rapids Banker a
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(".". (" «««»»«er lift. Tl„- «on» f 1» h.-rt of tte dt,.
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