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Clearwater Republican. [volume] (Orofino, Idaho) 1912-1922, April 28, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091128/1922-04-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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STATE u awards
DEGREES TO 57
j
From All Over State
I
Fifty-seven students were gradual- j
nineteen given normal diplomas
four given master's degrees by the (
University of y" 8 *""*'*?" " b " I
ter quarter which ended Marcli 22. j
Master's de « ree ®.'J* I
Willard, TACOMA, bachelor
business administration, Helen
Scott Meldrum, SPOKANE; Agnes
Bliiabeth Hammerberg and Edeltrud 0
«choir. Miller, SEATTLE; in liberal j
S
Students
E .,d Work With Winter
Quarter.
Robert
in
arts.
Those who received the degree of
bachelor of arts were Crelgh J. Cun
ningham. EVERETT; Ruth Engle
honi SPOKANE; Frances E. Knapp,
lYNDKN; Annette Leonard, BURNS,
nre Arthur H. Towne, CARROLLS;
Carol Wakefield, ANACORTES; Lil
lian A D. Crane, Helen Whitman Fos
sick Mildred Prescott Oellermann,
Lucy Kangley, May E. Meyer, Hern
don Smith, Thelma Thompson, Beulah
Wallin, May L. Zimmerman and Fred
Merritt, SEATTLE,
receiving the degree of bach
ot education were Chun Chui, i
CHINA; Marjorie Bennett, CHEHA
LIS' Margaret Bille, TACOMA; Kath
Barnhisel, Blanche E. Markham
and Margie C. Nicholson, SEATTLE.
Those who received the degree of
bachelor of science in engineering
Edward W. Conroy, ANACON
Sherrill
Those
elor
ryn
were
DA, Mont.; Ernest L. Dawe, NEW
WESTMINSTER, B. C.; Paul Miller
Jacobsen, ELLENSBURG; C. Edward
Burrough, " '
Edwin
Allen, Edward
Latham Bolton, Joseph S. Gatewood,
Eric Ernest Hopson George Elwyn
Large, Augustus R. Pope and Myrell
Walker, SEATTLE.
Those receiving the degree of bach
elor of business administration were
Joseph E. Kriegier, SPOKANE; Rob
ert Milton
Arthur J.
jUsiue, Jr., Frank L. Curtis, Albert
Hilllips Frederickson, Lionel
worth Hollowell, Charles B. Howe,
Winfield Angus McClean and Charles
H. Whitlaw, SEATTlJfcl.
Oliver Finley Byerly, PORTLAND,
Ore., and J. H. Bronson Smith, SE
ATTLE, received the degree of bach
elor of science in forestry.
Stanley Morton Mucklestone, SEAT
TLE, received the degree of bachelor
of science in fisheries.
McCroskey, COLFAX;
Anderson, Edward L.
Ells
Rohert Stetson Macfarlane and
Ethan Allen Peyser, SEATTLE, re
ceived the degree of bachelor of laws.
Mary Frances Small received the
degree of bachelor of fine arts, SEAT
TLE.
GERKING NEW MANAGER
COUNTY FARM BUREAU
At the meeting of the executive
committee of the Stevens County Farm
bureau on Thursday, C. H. Gerking
of Meyers Falls was elected manager
to succeed Frank A. Savage, who re
signed in order to take office May 1
as receiver of the land .office in Spo
kane.
Mr. Gerking has been manager of
the Meyers Falls branch of the Spo
kane Fruit Growers' company for the
last six years, where he has handled
an annual business of approximately
$250,000.
for the farm bureau yesterday. His
family will continue to live at Meyers
Falls.
E. G. Hohlstedt was elected a
ber of tin- business committee In place
of Henry L. Hughes, resigned M. H.
C. Allen was continued as secretary of
the farm bureau.
He commenced bis work
mem
OKANOGAN HOLDS BIG
DAIRY CATTLE SALE
Thirty-three head of Hereford bulls.
Shorthorn heifers and bulls brought
average of $126 at the
annual sab' of Okanogan County Pure
bred Breeders' association on April 6 .
Sales ranged from $80 to $176. Only
two cows sold for less than $100. A
Hereford
$176.
Nine
the Mel It
an
second
ball topped the sale at
Hereford bulls were sold by
"w Valley Live Stock com
Some of the string
exhibited at the Spokane. I«ew
and Portland live stock shows.
Te " Shorthorn cows brought $1285.
"lie Okanogan County Live Stock
association on April 7 reelocted E. F.
Bimke
panv for $ 1195 ,
were
istnn
r President and P. T. Harris
se retry treasurer. Okanogan County
edernl Live Stock Loan association
reelected E. F. Bunker president and
'H. Ynnd
secretary-treasurer.
netted gem potatoes
bring RECORD PRICE
v r,,< '" r, l price for the sale of Stev
, 1 »unty Netted Gem soed potatoes
" ls bopn Announced by F. A. Snvage.
•Ils
""huger of the Stevens county farm
'"iroau. The returns on one car of
pooled
potatoes
that the buroau
upped for its mombors averaged
l,v " r $6« a ton.
Arkansns
a man who speaks sev
< languages has been married to
a womnu
who Bpenks only twelve, yet
"o will bpt on the lady.
'••in purehred sire campaign ls
"ringing gU0(1 re 8 U j U by eliminating
,hc scrub sire.
CRANBERRY DISEASES
STUDIED IN PACIFIC CO.
Cranberry diseases in Pacific .
ty are being studied l>v
nun
Dr. P. I).
j Heald, head of the plant pathology de
Priment of the state
I Washington.
night there with M. D. Armstrong
tension horticulturist,
spraying program for the
part of the clean-up program which
j wil , be pushed vigorously C0Ü R .
tlon wUh the 8tate department of agri
( culture in a b an d 0 „ed bogs and seeing
I thnt K rowers employ the best known
j spraying practices. In June a plant
I Pathologist will be sent to the cran
berry 8ectlon t0 devote his entire time
throughout the season to investiga-1
ti ons 0 f diseases and demonstrations
0 f cranberr y production work This
j s ma d e possible through the cooDer !
ation of the Pacific count, commU- !
sioners, who have appropriated funds
to be used in part for this purpose
with the experiment station and the
extension service of the state college
"Cranberry growing is one of the
infant industries of Washington sus- :
ceptible of large development " says *
Director E. C. Johnson of the expert-!
r ssvzssrrzrxi :
important "Apiece'o^wmrk."
'•Homemaking has come to be rec- |
ognized as a profession—just like law
College of
He is spending a fort
, ex
planning a
season as a
I
;t
i
HOME-MAKING SHOULD
BE MADE PROFESSION
and medicine, declared Dean Ava B.
Milam of the school of home eco- ;
nomics in speaking before housewives
and others from various parts of the !
state at Corvallis last week for Home
makers' conference. Dean Milam was
, . ,
speaking on Homemaking From a
New Standpoint.
"Homemaking today presents a big
labor problem," said Dean Milam. "The
housewife must know whether to bake
her bread or to buy It. Information
on nutrition and food selection must
be studied. Instead of living in their
homes many are living in apartments.
Frequently architects are alowed to
plan houses but not to save steps.
"The housewife will profit by the
lesson shown by the draft when 20 per
cent of the men were unfit for serv
ice. Then there will be less idleness,
better health, more efficiency,
morrow we must let the pendulum
1
swing back to simplicity again. The j
family must lead a more simple life." '
* __
To
The reports of General Goethals on
the feasibility of the Columbia basin
irrigation project are favorable. He
recommends the Pend Oreille gravity
system to the Columbia river pumping
system. The estimated cost of the
gravity project is $254,170,351, or
PACIFIC COAST
$145.56 per acre.
1
of
H.
of
The chamber civic bureau will co
operate in three important civic
events scheduled in May—the Tulip
festival at Bellingham May 4, 5 and 6 ;
the Blossom festival at Wenatchee
May 6 and 6 , and the Grant County
Electrical Development celebration at
Ephrata, May 12 and 13.
Seattle's ninth annual rose show
will be held in the Forestry building
at the university some time in June.
This year's exhibition will be the
largest and best in the history of the
organization if the society's hopes are
realized. A large display of new va
rieties is expected, several local rose
fanciers having been developing nov
elties. In order to encourage liower
culture in general throughout the com
munity, classes for flowers other than
roses will be provided at this year's
show.
Timber stumpage on flfty-alx thou
sand acres of land In the Snoqnalmle
forest reservation located on the Sauk
river 45 miles east of Everett, esti
mated to contain 235.000,000 feet of
timber, is advertised for sale by the
government at $2 per thousand for fir
and $2.75 for cedar.
6 .
A
at
by
F.
The King county commissioners
have appropriated $ 6,000 for iminwll
nte work on the Sand Point aviation
base to fit it for immediate use. This
will be used lor tests by the Boeing
Airplane works and tor the plauea of
Captain Amundsen for his north pole
trip.
Three hundred or more delegates
expected to attend the Pacific
Northwest conference of the Retail
Credit Mon's association to be held in
Seattle May 15 and 16. A special rail
rate has been arrauged for the dele
gates who will come from all parts of
Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Mon
tuna. George H. Raymond, preeident
of the Seattle association, Is in charge
of the entertainment and meetings of
the conference which will be held in
the auditorium of Frederick and Nel
son company.
are
of
The advance guard of 120 families
who will form a settlement has ar
rived at Glenwood, near Port Orchard.
The newcomers will farm with berries
and poultry and establish a sawmill.
to
ls
Simplicity, comfort and becoming
make for the well dressed
ness
woman.
BRENTWOOD FARMS
TOP SALE AVERAGE
,,
^urnaUon consigned
Bre,ltwo °d sale, held at Philadelphia
March 20 th to 23rd, twenty-one of }°.
their choice young animals, receiving
higher tban that of al, y otber con
8ignor ' evew tbou B b Carnation sold "
more animals than any other farm. .
! Thls is tbe second time in succession 1
! that Carnation has made the highest j *"
average at thls premier sale. This
years average is over $500.00 above I
the general average of the sale.
The nlghest P riced Carnation female
was a yearling daughter of Matador, 1 '
: which brought *«200. this being only
* 100 under the top-priced female of
the 8ale ' The 8on of Segis ^iete^Je
: sä käs :
Can,ation captured the lion's share
of the prizes offered at the show of 1
all sale cattle held just preceding the
sale, totalling $1120 in premiums. Car
nation Matador Pontiac, the $4200
heifer won $1000 prize for grand
| champion female of the show. She
to
tlie
to the 1922
Second Year for Highest Aver
age at Brentwood's Pre
mier Sale.
average price straight through of '
I $1367.00 per head. This average is
by
;t n
it
was 2d prize at the National Dairy
show, 1921, and junior champion at
; the Pacific International, and at Brent
wood defeated tile Minnesota heifer
! who stood first over her at the dairy
show last fall,
Another Matador daughter won 3d
prize in the same class at Brentwood.
while a four-year-old daughter of
Segis Poi.tiac Acme was 2d in her
class, and a heifer calf sired by Pros
pect's son was third in her class,
EXCEED HALF MILLION
_
PARM LOANS IN STATE
terests amounting to $40,000 have
Washington loans to agricultural in
been approved by the war finance cor- 1
poration in Washington, D. C., accord
ing to word reaching Kenneth Mur
1 ray, secretary of the state agricultural
j «seney, recently,
' A 8umInar y of the activities in the
; state since the agency first began the
consideration of applications last fall
i was given by Mr. Murray as follows:
: Loans applied for. $1,115,192; loans
recommended by the state agency,
$911,542, and loans approved by thel
on j war finance corporation and paid to
| farmer borrowers in the state, $644,
648.
! The loans have been placed through
1 27 different banks, trust companies,
! cattle loan companies or cooperative
or live stock organizations and represent
on an average probably ten individual
loans through each institution.
co
;
at
j
To clear logged-off land for one-half '
of what it formerly cost, is the pur- i
pose of a series of demonstrations be
ing conducted by the Extension Serv
ice of the State College of Washing
ton in many of the west side counties
of the state.
CHEAPER LAND CLEARING
FOR THE WEST SIDE
va
The new method has worked suc
cessfully in Oregon, where it was cost
ing $200 to clear an acre with the or
dinary methods; a number of acreages
were cleared by the new method for
$100 per acre, or one-half the cost.
This fact has stirred farmers and
logged-off land owners In .western
Washington, so thnt there is a demand
to see a demonstration of the new
stump burning device.
The new method consists of a burner
arranged in the form of a «mall,
heavy, cast iron furnace, which burns
a little bark and the wood of the
of
the
fir
stump. It hums a hole through the
stump and converts the hanked stump
Into a roaring furnace, burning the
roots deep Into the ground. Stumps
from two to eight feet In diameter
have been burned in Oregon from $1.50
to $2 per stump, and 110 large bole In
the ground Is left.
"The new I,timer.'* says R. M. Tur-1
„er of the Extension Service. has
taken much of the hard work and ex
pense out of land clearing and. In
stead, has placed an interesting winter
occupation for the farmer. He only
needs to tend the burners in the day
time when his chores are done, and
for that reason it fits in excellently
with our winter farm work. The out
fit is very practical and is not expen
sive. It works in all soils but it pure
sand or a washed gravel. It Is suc
cessful on any soil, from a sandy loam
down to the heavy clays, and will burn
fir. spruce, pine and oak."
Demonstrations for stump burning
have been scheduled in King county
for April 29. Snohomish county May
6 , Pierce county May 13 and Clallam
county May 20. The burning has now
actually started in King county pre
paratory to the demonstration. In all
the counties the demonstration) will be
conducted by the county agent of the
county In which the work is being con
ducted.
of
in
of
of
in
ar
The state of Washington has taken
over at par an $18,000 bond issue of
the village of Creston. Proceeds will
be used to install a municipal water
system.
MUST HAVE $15.00 TARIFF
Failure
Would Mean Closing
Down of Chewelah Plant and
«Kamst foreign product high enough
}°. e,,able thp dome8tic industry to
" hen foreign Ku ppliea were cut ofT,
. generous capital was investetl to bring
1 le domestic fields to production, un
j *" ">day, after expenditure of many
? ns .. ot dolIars ' * h « y are able t0
I 8upply th e demand of the entire coun
, Tnf „ r „„ , . . ......
Unfortunately for this industry and
1 ' 1 '"'a . 1 ProsperUy, powerful United
i,dere8t8 f ontro1 ' be sources
foreign supply in Austria and
Greece, with the result that great
: ää ïs
~sse
the .Jomestically-owned domestic in
1
Irreparable Loss.
.
By Sidney Norman.
Editor .Mining Truth, Spokane.
Everything possible must lie done
to strengthen the hands of those!
friends of the magnesite industry in '
tlie United States who are fighting
valiantly for imposition of a tariff
The magnesite industry of Stevens
' county is teh only great enterprise
created in this section of the country
by the exigencies of war. At a time
During «he progress of the tariff
fight at Washington, a mass of in
formation was placed before the
House and Senate committees. Much
of it was relevant and much more of I
it quite irrelevant and merely given !
to muddy the waters.
The Plain Facts.
The great
magnesite industry of Stevens county
cannot live with a lower tariff than
$15 on dead-burned and $10 on crude,
a s fixed by the ways and means com
of mittee of the House.
finance
The facts are these:
The Senate
committee's recommendation
of $8 for dead-burned and $6.25 for
crude would mean the death of the
local industry. The great plant at
Chewelah would remain closed down,
to the irreparable injury of the entire
Northwest. There can be no question
upon that score. Either the Senate
must lie made to see the error of its
in
committee's recommendation, or the
1 plants in Stevens county
abandoned and the money invested in
them written off.
must be
the
the
There is no chance that the domes
tic product can compete successfully
with the foreign under the Senate com
mittee's recommendation. No Ameri
can magnesite can find its way to the
Atlantic coast at this time, either in
competition with the Austrian prod
uct, for refractories, or with the Gre
fall
thel 1 ' 811 P IO< l U( 'L f° r plastic cement work.
to The ,owest costs in the fields of
Stevens county, f. o. b. cars on Pa
cidc coast or at all >' point in the state
Washington, are over $25 per ton.
on a Production -basis sufficient to
su PP'y tb ® markets of^ Chicago ami the
Middle W est. Reduction of that cost
to $20.50 per ton might be possible
upon a production basis sufficient to
supply the market as far east as At
lantic seaboard points. However, there
is not the slightest chance, nor is it
j even hoped by producers, that the do
mestic industry will be called upon to
' supply more than one-half of the
pur- i American demand, even with a tariff
be- 0 f $15 per ton.
Austria Has It AIL
Austria has had the entire Ameri
can market for dead-burned magnesite
all to herself for the past sixteen
months, not a ton of domestic mate
rial having been produced in that time.
-Prior to the war, when both Aus
trinn labor and fuel were higher than
suc
or
for
and
new
now. foreign costs were less than $ 1 "
per ton lauded on American shores,
or less than $9 per ton f. o. I). cars
nt Austrian plants.
Does the Senate finance committee
believe that American producers can
pay h minimum wage of $3 per day.
as against Austrian average wages of
the
27 1-2 cents per day and produce mag
nesite calcines for $25 per ton, paving
$21 per ton freight In addition and
compete with foreign magnesite, the
delivered cost of which is certainly
not over $15 per ton at points of com
petition on th Atlantic coast?
Or, does it think that domestic in
vestments in foreign lands are more
sacred than domestic investments in
the
the
In
. „
Tur-1 0 U I, own C0U „ n 1 tryT
has >, To , any '»' d '"«-' y ">«» » amaz
ex- '" g ,ha, , our ow " Kovemn.enr should
In- heaitate for one moment t0 nfford f '* n
day
and
out
suc
now
pre
all
be
the
con
protection to a domestic industry that
would make us independent of foreign
sources of supply in both peace and
war tlme£.
Industry Here Big.
The industry of Stevens county will
support over 500 men at good wages
in conformity with American stand
ards of living, and thus bring prosper
ity over a wide area. It Is interest
ing to remember thnt in four years
prior to 1921 the Northwest Magne
site company alone paid over $5,000,
000 In freight rates on magnesite
shipped to eastern points and incom
ing supplies necessary for conduct of
its great enterprise.
The preservation of this industry is
one of the most important duties now
before the people of the Northwest,
especially those of Spokane and the
neighboring county of Stevens. Noth
ing must be left undone to strengthen
the hands of these who aee fighting
our battles. They are not fighting for
the magnesite producer alone, but for
the happiness and prosperity of every
man, womnu and child in this great
Northwest.
of
will
SCHOOL DAYS
t4-4*t - ea-ee «Î E( ' ks» jt ou fin sp ».
" " j ~• 1 *1 ? : tuttU MtiilsW -
t ok.LD- a», *« «* , L__. — .-«< ,1 ,r,
live Vi««»- «««. " - ! / tK» sun till
jTou w>»nk, se«' t T -J-.A
.
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5 THE GIRL ON THE JOB =
iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiii^
How to Succeed—How to Get E
Ahead—How to Make Good 5
Bv JESSIE ROBERTS \
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
political positions.
T
HERE are many civic positions
which will certainly be open to
women in a short time, not only
here and there, but everywhere. In
many of our smaller cities and towns
the women's clubs have done a great
civic work already, proving that wom
en are well fitted to do such work.
There Is no reason at all why a woman
should not be commissioner of street
cleanlng. and there seem to be mnny
reasons pointing to the fact that she
would be an excellent one. As factory
inspectors, as recorders, and in posi
tions having to do with the household
Fide of the community, women can do
excellent work.
Women who go into politics should
go with a sense of service to the body
politic. If they do that and can point
to results that prove them square,
honest and devoted, many women are
going to find themselves elected to city
If you have a lient toward civic
work, study the problems In your own
community. The past generation saw
the marvellous development of women
as to the business world. The coming
one is sure to see an equally amazing
entry into the world of political work.
Jobs.
So far women who have been ap
pointed to various city or state posl
tlons have not had to play politics,
They have been given such positions
because they were fitted for them and
hud the necessary training. That Is
the right spirit. Get your training and
do your studying, know your problems
and the type of people with whom you
must work. If you are fit for the Job.
you have as good a chance as your
brother to get it—or you will huve be
! fore old time is much older.
(Copyright.)
-O
^
i
j
!
1
:
LYRICS OF LIFE
By DOUGLAS MALLOCH
THE MAN YOUR BOY WILL BE.
OU «ometlmes worry, wonder what
Tour boy will be a man;
Tou like to look ahead a lot,
The future try to »can.
' You hope he'll be a man in fact
As well as man In size,
And so his every boyish act
watch with anxious eyea
Y
v
But do not worry—you can tell
• The man your boy will l*«,
If he the truth wili follow well
You try to make him see;
You need not watch his nights and days
In search of guilt or guile—
You only need to turn y»
Upon yourself awhile.
gaze
There la the place for men to look.
For fathers to Inquire;
Bon* do not learn life from a book
They learn It from their sire.
The rule you make your boy obey
Must bs the rule for you—
The boy will heed the thing you sa)
But more the thing will do.
It I» not difficult to know
Th» futur» of the lad,
For he will very likely grow
Kxactly like ht» dad.
Th» life he leads a» time unfolds,
Wh»n boyhood day» are fled.
Will be the life he now behold»—
The life hl» father led.
(Copyright.)
-O
UP I TM.
MAIN POINT
"Life la a blank."
"Juat ao. Now how are you going
to fill It outr*
HothfriCooRBook
l
J
Word
ell
glances of
trank
or.
friendly eyes,
Ixive's smallest
coin.
vhlch yet to 6 om«
may g
The mo i se
1 liât may keep alive a starv
ing heart.
GOOD FOODS.
DESSERT which is different but
which Is both attractive and
nutritous is :
A
Rice Ice Cream.
Boll two and one-hulf tublespoonfuls
of rice In 11 pint of milk with three
fourths of u cupful of sugar, a pinch
of salt and w hen done rub through a
sieve; when cold add one-hulf cupful
of finely chopped almonds, one-fourth
of a cupful of powdered sugar, one
pint of whipped cream and two stiflly
beaten egg whites. Freeze and serve
In sherbet glasses garnished with chen
ries,
Stew together one cupful of seeded
raisins and one-quarter of a cupful
of dried currunts in one pint of aprl
cot Juice. Add three tablespoonfuls of
butter and two egg yolks, two table
spoonfuls of lemon Juice and sugar to
taste. But into a shell that has been
previously bnked, cover with a
meringue made with the whites of the
eggs and four tablespoonfuls of sugar,
Raisin Pie.
Tills is the last word in raisin pies:
Hot Potato Salad.
Wash and peel potatoes and cut Into
balls with a small French cuttei^
there should be two cupfuls. Cook In
boiling salted water until tender, drain
and pour over the following dressing
after they are well sprinkled with
minced paisley: Mix one half tea
spoonful of salt, one-fourth teaspoon
ful of pepper, four tablespoonfuls of
olive oil, one-half cupful of finely
minced celery, two slices of lemon,
two tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar
and two tablespoonfuls of minced
onion, one inblespoonful of cider vlne
Hent to the boiling point, re
gnr.
move the slices of lemon and pour over
the potatoes.
Sour Cream Cake Filling.
Cook together one cupful each of
sour cream and brown sugar; when
thick stir in one cupful of hickory nut
Add flavoring and spread on
meats.
the cake « Idle still warm.
Sardine Salad.
Cut two stalks of celery Into bits,
chop half a teaspoonful of parsley, re
move the skins and bones from a box
of sardines and break Into hits. Toss
all together and chill. Serve with a
boiled dressing with some of the oil
from the can added If it Is of good
flavor. Serve on crisp, well chilled let
tuce leaves.
"Hu LjU vcüJL
prn Newspaper Uuloa.
Copy rI k hi 10 21 . W
THE CHEERFUL CHERUB
Im studying tke.
kuTYY&rt
To Find wk^t we ere
■Ck.ll •Kbovt —
How queer to tkink
rn kt-ve to die
Before I find tke
tonswer out!
rti.ee
•C.
mi
Bought a Quart.
"But, Clmrlle," protested the sweet
young bride, "father Is In no mood to
night to discuss business."
"Don't you worry, I'll soon have him
In flue spirits," her wise hubby ex
claimed, ns he tenderly lifted a quart
bottle from his brief case.—New York
Sun.

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