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The Oakley herald. [volume] (Oakley, Idaho) 1908-1961, February 17, 1911, Image 2

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THE OAKLEY HERALD
T. J. MURPHY
. MRS. L. MURPHY
OAKLEY . .
IDAHO
IMAGINE AGE GIVES FLAVOR
That Seem* the Only Explanation aa
to Why Fresh Nut» Are Never
' ServeB on Shipboard.
"Whence do all the old nuts come,
and where do they go?" was the ques
tion put to a New York Times re
porter by a broker who had Just
turned from hla wml annul trip to
Europe.
"On my many voyages across the At
lantic and in the eastern seas," tha
broker went on to say, "I have never
seen fresh nuts on the dining tables
which were laden with all the delica
cies of the season The only person
1 ever met who had seen fresh nuts
—jMkaa a grizzled quartermaster, who
looked old enough to have sailed the
raging main with Paul Jones He
Said tersely :
" Tve seen 'em wunst. On the Tan
_ long Pagar pier at Singapore In
*' sacks, but they never come aboard
'the ship.'
1. "Fellow-passengers with whom 1
have discussed the problem were of
the opinion that the steamship com
panies had some big c.ave where all
Buts were stored for a few decades un
til they had aged.
"Capt. Pritchard, the retired com
modore of the Cunard line, once told
me that the Island of Tobago, where
Robinson Crusoe lived, was the clear
ing house for nuts, and the companies
sent them there ln sacks to be ex
changed after they had been afloat
for three years. This was corrobo
rated by Capt. Arthur P. Mills of tha
American liner Philadelphia, who said
that an old shipmate of his, Capt
Ben Brails, had carved his Initials on
a Brazil nut and put It back on the
dish while his ship was crossing the
North sea, and got the same nut on
another vessel four years later ln the
Btraits of Shtmenosekl, Japan. Thla
had auch an effect on the mind of
Skipper Brails that he marked all
kinds of nuts with his Initials and the
date and wrote letters to all his old
shipmates requesting them not to
track any of his marked nuts If they
met them on their voyagea."
Veteran stewards, when asked why
MJe companies do not put fresh nuts on
board their ships, say that perhaps the
tompanles are afraid they will dis
agree with the passengers.
re
%
Hobble 8klrt In Bible Time.
Can any one doubt, asks a writer ln
a French newspaper, that the ladles of
Jerusalem ln Biblical times were Im
peded ln their walk, like the ladles of
today? In the latter part of the
third cLtpter of the Prophecy of
tsaiair >iys the writer before referred
rfe get a glimpse of how these
daughters of Sion dressed on gala oc
casions. We learn further, he says,
from a passage ln the Talmud (Baby
lonian), chapter vl. (Schabbats trans
lation), that the robes of the ladles
were so tight that they could only
walk with short steps. By this means i
» greater opportunity was afTorded to
their admirers to observe them. The !
writer, quoting from the Vulgate, ob
"Nihil sub sole novtum." The
j
... n , , . « .....
A New York physician recently told I
me this story of a precocious little girl
of ten. She Is the daughter of an at- I
tractive lady of society whom the fam- :
Uy doctor_a young man_was attend
LL YL tLflYnY g ,il Yw a H ,
ng for nfluenza. He felt her pulse
gravely and tenderly, holding her wrist :
f- «»•*" ">*»"«' »' *
doctor, as he sat beside her In the '
drawing room. As he did so he be
came aware that the child had her
great grave eyes, full of inquiry, fixed
npon him.
"You don't know what I am doing,
my little lady?" said the medical man
lightly to the Interested little miss.
"Yes 1 do," was the prompt and
positive reply
"And what may that be, pray?" con- !
tlnued the doctor
"Well, H you want me to tell
you are making love to mamma
Metropolitan Magazine.
serves :
•uggestlon evidently is that the hob
ble Bklrt was ln vogue ln very far
away Urne«.
8he Knew.
you, J
Each to His Own Game.
"That was a pretty good trick
turned with that Easterner, Jim," says
the Nevada boomer. "Sellin' him ten
totwn lots in the middle o' Death Val
ley was sure scientific work!"
you
"Mebbe so," growls Jim.
h-ear the rest o' thaat, did ye?
that feller got me so convinced he
was a nice little piece o' open faced
honesty that he got me to go hack
East with him an' interdured
his brother ,an' his brother Bold
some choice city lots within
"Didn't
Say.
I
me tn
ms
easy
walkin' distance o' the Noo York city
hall."
"What about that?"
"What about it? Easy
tance, all right—if you w
for ten days!"—Judge.
walkin' dis
aut to walk
!
î
]
,
!
I
Indiscreet.
"My wife has gotten into
trying to smuggle."
"Mine's in bad, too
bought me a seat in the senate as a
fettle suiprise, and now she's beeu In
dieted for bribery."—Ixmlsvlll« Cour
1ur-Journal
troubl*
She weat and i
Terms Cash.
Poet
ed rooms, please?
Landlady—One dollar
Suicide with g&s, 60 cents extra I —
How much are your fumlsh
P«r night.
I
Adventures by
the Way
When Cecilia saw the bamboo tea |
tray and stand In the window of the j
little shop her whole soul yearni d for |
them. So she was Irresistibly drawn '
through the doorway and soon she had
purchased them In spite of the fact
that she would have to carry them
home herself.
She started off with them bravely
aa
!
enough, though the upper edge of the |
tray In its paper wrappings reached j
above her waist and she kicked the
legs of the stand at each step. ;
"Well it s lieht anvhnw " she told
«eu, us ignt, anynow, sne told.
herself consolingly.
ft was light At the first street
I " '. , nr8t 8treet
crossing a gust of wind caught the
tray and flapped It like a great

■Ing,
propelling Cecilia Into the path of an j
approaching automobile, from which ;
she was dragged by a disapproving po- {
llceman.
"Cab, lady?" called a cabman at the !
corner as she neared him.
know they allowed moving vans on the ;
bullyvard," he remarked to a com
panion, before she was out of
shot.
"Didn't
ear
"Disgusting creature!" muttered Ce
"I wonder if I'd
better take the elevated over to the
station or go on and take a bus?" she |
reflected. She regarded the steep ln- j
eline of the elevated stairway and de
C «vni^ n the omnibus - !
get In an empty one and go up J
to the front corner," she planned, "and |
then these things won't be In the way
of other people."
which
cilia, hastening on.
j
A small inner voice
Cecilia quickly suppressed,
added: "Not so conspicuous."
"I'm so glad I bought them," she as
sured herself defiantly.
She found the omnibuses all partly
filled, bo she stationed herself at the
edge of the sidewalk to wait for an
empty to draw up.
,, . .
behmi hër 't i \ ? y V ° r
behind her. I wish to get Into the
are blocking ab ~- rcel
Cecllla stepped hastily out of the
path of a portly, hobble-skirted per
sonage and the legs of the stand be
came entangled with the feet of a
passing pedestrian.
"Confound it!" exclaimed the man.
disentangling his feet and glaring at
the cause of the accident. "Wonder
she wouldn't try to carry home a
whole furniture store." he remarked I
to his companion as they passed on. 1
Cecilia made her way to the inner !
omnibus.
I
j
edge of the pavement and, turning her ]
back to the passersby, gazed with ap
parent absorption into the shop win
dow.
"Well, for goodness' sake!" she ex- i
i claimed, stumbling. She looked from
the parcel to Cecllla and then with a >
! grin at her friend. "What do you
know about that!" she said. \
"I thought moving day was last
May," giggled the other. I
The driving up of an empty omnibus
offered Cecilia an avenue of escape,
j and she dived across the sidewalk and i
plunged Into it,, seeking the farthest j
corner In which to stow herself and :
I *,« r hnnrtle
"Thin ian'» n . I
I th „ llE , t d ' ,
: Hardly did the reflection nn«s 1
Hardly did the reflection pass ,
throu 8 h her mind before consternation :
entered it from another quarter. "Oh, [
: here's that Mr Rolhv ww,.'.
LZr? .1,. Lld IS h." Til '
' h ope he won't see me. Of course, he
w j||_ though "
"Say, ain't that brown one perfectly
her.
I
ewell!'' cried a voice
behind
"Let s get up dose to the window so's I
I can see how that lace Is put on."
Two women pressed close up to the
window, one of them encountering the '
legs of the stand before she perceived
;
it.
1
"Well, Miss Thorpe, this is what I
call luck!" exclaimed the young man,
fitting himself Into the vacant place
beside her. j
"Why, Mr. Selby!" cried Cecllla.
"Luck! I should say so. 1 was just \
thinking that 1 should have
over to the station alone."
"l.et's wait until these other people
get out," suggested young Selby. !
• \Ve've got lots of time for the five- !
lo ride I
I
twenty."
The woman opposite rose and made
for the door.
1 beg pardon, called young Selby
after her She s forgetting her furnl- '
ture," he whispered laughingly to Ce
cilia.
Cecilia put out her hand desperate
ly. "It isn't her's," she said. "It's
mine."
in
lours! began Selby, in astonish
ment. He recovered himself quickly. '
"Well, it looks like something mighty
inter—"
î
j
"Yes, it is mine," burst out Cecilia. ■ |t
it's a Japatfqse bamboo tea tray and j
,i stand I bought them at a shop
»here they dont deliver things, and 1
carried them over to the bus. and
every idiot on the street has had
something to say about that horrid : a
package If 1 had put the whole thing |
on my head and run a hat pin through
■ .
it everybody would have thought it '
was some kind of a new hat and said !
it was awfully stylish, but because I
carried it in my hand they laughed at
, m **'
Young Selby looked at her flushed |
cheeks and then at the parcel, and |
laughed long and loud.
! "Excuse these tears," he
I don't want
i
I j
said.
to seem
but it is quite a sizable load for
son of your build."
unsympathetic,
a per
He stood up and
took the bundle in his hand
anyway," he announced
"Well,
"I'm going
to carry it the rest of the way home.
Tve got to see what the things look
Uke with t!:e wrappings off "
I
RHEUMATISM

|
j
|
'
I want every chronic rheumatic to throw
• way all modi einen, all liniments, all
plaster«, nnr! cl e Ä.i'NYON'8 RHEUMA
TISM REMEDY a trial. No matter what
| *r!y
j prejudbeii 'von n ay tie 'against all adver
XtVnT*et% ÎÏÏküÏÏT
; TISM ItEMKPT. If it falls to give sntls
faction,I will refund yonr mon»y.—Munyon
Remember this remedy contains no sai
Icvllc acid, no opium cooalne, morphine or
«tuer harmful drugs. It is put up tinder
the guarantee of the Pure Food and Drug
Art.
no matter what
no matter how

For aale by all druggists. Price. 2Bc.
j =
; FIGHTING THE WHITE PLAGUE
{ -
Educational Posters by the Thousand
to Be Displayed All »ver
United States.
!
;
During the next three months, the
bill boards of the United States will
display 20,000 educational posters on
tuberculosis
nouncement made by the National As
aoclation for the Study and Preven
| tlon of Tuberculosis,
j This will conclude the campaign be
gun ^ yea r ago, when the National
! Posters' assoclaatton donated free
J apace to the tuberculosis cause, the
| Poster Printers'
according to . an an
association offered
j free printing, and nine paper manu
facturera gave the paper for the post
srs. The combined value of these sev
eral donations for this three-month
sampalgn Is nearly $100,000.
The posters are in six different de
ilgns and are all printed ln three rol
They are seven feet wide and
***'? 2 ' 5 °°
of these posters have been hung on
the bn! boards of different cities,
and It , 8 planned to d)strlbute 20000
-, before Apr,, X In over 400 towns
Xy In the Unlt^ Stages "°'
F *,Z ? , ,
DO rtatlon as man/ 'f e ih C6Pl for trans
he hi,™ ! h T ff™
b6 " tte , b0ards , its ter '
^ 7 K The , N 1 a,,onal association with
XI, Bülnôme ( °h X N *
and Distrlbutors
'X« Xe X , , ,
I ™, Z e g / aP f ° rm
1 . . Y', g00 5 f °° d .
! X , Y < Z ^
work and closed windows lead to
ors.
may re
are
and rest
con
sumption; and how the careless con
I sumptlve menaces the health of his
j family by spitting on the floor.
]
i neral of » millionaire financier—one
01 those real high financiers' whose
> ow methods Lawson loves to turn the
light on.
\ "I arrived at the funeral a little
la,e I took a seat beside Lawson
I and whispered:
" 'How far has the service gone?'
"Lawson, nodding towards the der
i gyman ln the pulpit, whispered back;
j " 'Just opened for the defense.' "
: -
. ..
I , An Optical Illusion,
, , «Pecks Mlstah Rastus Plnkley
1 *r ^ ° Ub * ! . Ba | d Ml8S Miaml Bn} wn.
, Las evenin' I saw de teardrops
: Rreamln' down hts face."
[ "Dem warn't teardrops " reDlied
.<• Ô, . l * arnro P 8 - ieplied
' " " *•*••*• "• W
_ A Sample Quip.
"Thomas W. Lawsqn's Thanksgiv
I Ing proclamation
I
' Bo8 t°n baqker.
ful1 of Q U *PS
was a very good
; piece of oratorical writing,"
said a
"La'wson is always
"Not long ago I attended the fu
1
hisse'f a little splattered up fillin' his
Christmas gif' fountain pen."
Don't part with your Illusions,
When they are gone you may still ex
1st, but you have ceased to live._
j Mark Twain.
\
!
!
It Is no use holding up the divine
I throne if you're treading on the chtl
I Iren's toes to do It.
CHEATED FOR YEARS.
Prejudice Will Cheat Ua Often If We
Let It.
Ton will be astonished to find how
largely you are Influenced ln every
' way by unreasoning prejudice,
In
many cases you will also find that the
prejudice has swindled you, or rather, i
made you swindle yourself. A case
in illustration;
"I have been a constant user of
Grape-Nuts for nearly three years."
'
»ays a correspondent, "and 1 am hap
î py to say that l am well pleased with
j the result of the experiment, for such
■ |t has been
j "Seeing your advertisement ln al
most all of the periodicals, for a long ,
time I looked upon It as a hoax. But
after years of suffering with gaseous
8nd bltter eructations from my stom
: a ch. together with more or less loss
| of appetite and flesh, I concluded to |
■ . ., , , , ,, , , -
try Grape-Nuts food for a little time
' and note the result. i
! -i fonild it d( ,| icious> and it was not
lonK till , b ,. Kan to e3£ , )t . rience the ;
ben oficiul effects. My stomach re
sumed its normal state, the 'éructa
| tions and bitterness ceased and I have
| gained all my lost weight back,
"I am so well satisfied with the
j result that so long as I may live and
retain my reason Grape-Nuts shall
constitute quite a portion of my daily
food."
Read "The Road to WellvUle." in
pkgs. "There's a Reason."
Ever read the ahove letter? A nm
one appenra from time to time.
d fall
They
•re frnvine, true,
f li h mai
Interest.
HITS NAIL ON HEAD!
ANSWER
WIFE GIVES POINTED
TO HUBBY'S QUESTION.
\
i
I
Attitude of Sexes Toward Meeting»
for Women Only and for Men Only
j
Î
- ]
It was 11:45 p. m. The man and |
hls wife had Just come home. They 1
did not come together. They had not
been to the same place. She had been !
to a meeting for women only, he to
one for men I
Made Him Feel Superior Until
Wife Spoke.
8ald the woman: "There was a
man at our meeting tonight."
Said the man: "There were about
a hundred women tried to push their
way Into ours."
"That one man," she said, "looked
awfully scared."
Those hundred women," said he,
"didn't look a bit scared."
I think," she said, "the man got
into our hall by mistake. Anyhow,
he got away as soon as he could."
There was no mistake about those
women being where they were," said
the man, "and they Btayed until they
were shooed away by the police."
There was a short silence. Said
the man presently:
"It la this difference in the attitude
of the sexes toward the meetings for
women only and for men only that
makes me feel morally superior. It
makes me proud of my
toe slightest desire—no man has the
slightest desire—to butt into a fem
inine confab, but the
breathed who wasn't on edge with ett*
rloslty in regard to what takes place
when a bunch of men hold a secret
conference.
sex. I haven't
woman never
I have known
who admitted that they would
lingly sacrifice
women
wll
a gear's normal pleas
ures for the privilege of being
gled Into a Masonic initiation
other masculine rite,
prying spirit with the modesty of
On your own showing, when a
Is accidentally trapped ln a hall where
a beauty congress or a dressmakers'
convention la ln progress, he Is so
miserable that the fly In the spider's
web had a picnic compared with his
martyrdom.
smug
or some
Contrast that
men.
man
That, to my mind, is a
pungent commentary on the disposi
tion of man and
explain It?"
Can you
woman.
The woman confessed
could not explain it—furthermore, that
she did not Intend to try.
There was another silence,
the woman after a little:
"Whfct happened at
tonight?"
that
she
Said
your meeting
Oh, nothing much," said the man.
"What happened at yours?"
"Everything," said the woman. Then
she proceeded to tell what
thing" comprised,
half an hour to tell It.
î and then the man, for consistency's
I sake, tried to look bored, but the air
of Indifference was ill assumed. The
narrative really Interested him, and
The^Wrv^ne enrtoA flnlBhed -
I other alienee* whil ' th™
1 bralderi hpr hi a L , u woman
' 1^,7 a „ L X„r Y
| - W hat question»" Q * ° D D ° W
! "\vhv wnmln aVo
1 omen are
"every
It took more than
Every now
was an
crazy to go to
j men s meetings, .while men wouldn't
j give a fig to go to women's
; ings. It's because the
home and tell the
meet
women come
men everything
that happened, so they don't need to
go, whereas tha
men never tell the
women anything."
"By George," said the man, "1 don't
know but what you're right."
First Cheap London Paper.
There was a time when London !
t ould boast of possessing the cheap- i
est newspaper in the world.
14, 1873, the first number
lished of the "Six-a-Penny or Penny- j
a-Week Town
On July I
was pub- i
and
Country Daily
Newspaper."
nounced that "this journal contains
equal to five news columns of The
Times."
The
prospectus an
Those unwilling to subscribe
eek could obtain single
copies at a farthing apiece,
had reached its sixtieth number it
name was changed because
threatened injunction in chancery by 1
a magazine bearing a similar title. I
The proprietors purchased the copy
right of a paper called the Sun and !
bestowed that name on their venture.
It did not prove a success, however,
and collapsed within less th
for a whole
When il ]
a i
of a :
i
an a year
»
Not to Be Outdone.
'
A young looking couple ln a subway
:rain seemed to be very much excited j
the other day, relates the New York !
Sun.
. . . . „
, V a 81 1 0118 P mse
h * ,l , h " / ns " ' !"*' 1 * ® ng over
1 " v ' ornan 8 1011,1 d. Perhaps
°" are not aware that I had a dozen
|,ro ^ alR of niarriage
|
They boarded the
train
at
One Hundred and Forty-ninth
and H became
eentb street that the conversation had
Just when
street
very evident at Four
to
before I uc
yours."
Apparently
dutn
- founded at the loud utterance the
. .... . uc e, tne
i 'T' n0t *° be out,lone . honied back:
, And >' ou ar e "°t aware that
; P r °P° sel1 to 20
° re 1 bet>ame acquainted with you."
women be
A Circus Within.
Little Freddie had just made his
first acquaintance with animal mak
ers. After eating quite an
of them. Freddie became very thought
"What makes you so pensive, dear?"
asked his mother.
"Oh, 1 was Just thinking what a
circus was goln* on Inside of me."—
Harper's.
assortment
ful
IT IS A MISTAKE
Many have the Idea that anything
will sell if advertised strong enough. |
Thla i* a great mistake.
f ew galea might be made by advertia- j
absolutely worthless article
True, a
I
\ Ing an
i but It is only the article that is
I bought again and again that pays. |
An example of the big success of a
wor thy article Is the enormous sale
that has grown up for Cascarets ;
j Candy Cathartic. This wonderful rec
Î ord Is the result of great merit suc
cessfully made known through per
] slstent advertising and the mouth-to
| mouth recommendation given Ca»
1 carets by Its friendi and users,
Like all great successes, trade pl
! ratea P re Y on tbo unsuspecting pub
J lc - by marketing fake tablets similar
I ln appearance to Cascarets. Care
should always be exercised ln pur
chasing well advertised goods, espe
cially an article that has a national
sale like Cascarets. JDo not allow a
mbstitute to be palmed off on you.
I
Tell Wellman.
"So you have a new Idea for a di
rigible balloon?"
"Yes. Make the equillbrator larger,
put a motor Into It, and let it pull the
balloon."
True charity will seek to purify
the well and not rest content with
jalnting. the pump.
A
*
By Lydia EL Pinkham's Vegetable Compound
The Change of Life is the most critical period of a
woman's existence, and neglect of health at this time
invites disease.
Women everywhere should remember that there is no
other remedy known to medicine that will so successfully
carry women through this trying period as Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, made from native roots
and herbs. Here is proof:
Natick, Mass.,—"I cannot express what I
went through during the Change of Life before
I tried Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound. I was ln such a nervous condition I
could not keep still. My limbs were cold. I
§! had creepy sensations and could not sleep
I nights. I was finally told by two physicians
Si! that 1 had a tumor.
I read one day of the wonderful cures made
by Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound
and decided to try it, and it lias made me a well
woman. My neighbors and friends declare it
has worked a miracle for me. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound is worth its weight in gold for women during this
period of life. If it w r ill help others you may publish this
letter."—Mrs. Nathan B. Greaton, 51 No. Main St., Natick,Mass.
ANOTHER SIMILAR CASE.
V
v
ÜI

^ 'IfnflVj.
I
I

3:
««
m3
ÏI
r
Cornwall ville, N. Y. — "I have been taking
Lydia E. Pinkliam's Vegetable Compound for
some time for Change of Life, nervousness, and
a fibroid growth.
"Two doctors advised me to go to the
hospital, hut one day while I was away visiting,
I met a woman who told mo to take Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound. 1 did so and I
know it helped me wonderfully. I am very
thankful that I was told to try Lydia E.__
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound." — Mrs. Wm. Bough ton.
Cornwallvllle, N. Y., Greene Co.
The makers of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com»
pound have thousands of such letters as those above_
they tell the truth, else they could not have been obtained
for love or money. This medicine is no stranger— it has
stood the test for years.
%
m
For 30 year» Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound ha* been the standard remedy for
female ills. No sick woman does justice to
herself who will net try this famous medicine.
Made exclusively from roots and herbs,
has thousands of cures to its credit.
_ Mrs. Pinkhara invites all sick women
m , ■ ^ to write her for advice. She has
guided thousands to health free of charge.
Address Mrs. Pinkham. Lynn, Mass.
!>?
S
!
i
j
and
I
i
m
ivclA t
INK!
1
I
!
]
i
:
-^ ENOUGH
* for the
IGGEST GAME
§&

'
'emlnÿtnn
AUTOLOADING RIFLE
j
!
Five one-ton shots ! As quick as you can pull the
trigger and as straight to the mark as you can look.
Meeting a "big 'un" with this gun is like shooting a hole in a bam
from the inside—and if the first ball shouldn't stop him, he can't gain
a yard before he gets it again.
Remington Autoloading Rifle solid breech, hammeriesa—ejects,
reloads and cocks by recoil without the loss of an ounce of muzzle
energy. The only automatic rifle which locks the cartridges m the
chamber. Safest and best of big guns.
Made in .25, .30-30, .32 and .35 Remington calibres.
Game." Inspect it at any dealers.
1 h* Gun lor tha game
" Game Laut for 1910 " mailed free.
THE REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY. Aa.nc, 299 Bro«jw„, N.w York Citr
For
DISTEMPER
Pink Eye, Epizootic
Shipping Fever
t» Catarrhal Fever
fey*)
tel
SPQHH MEDICAL CO., »K GOSHEN, IND„ U. S. A.
Hood's
|
j
I
Sarsaparilla
| . . ,
Eradicates scroiula and all
c ^er humors Cures all their
; _ , ' , , , . ,
ertectS, makes the blood rich
and abundant, strengthens all
the vital organs. Take it
Get it today in usual liquid form or
chocolated tablets called Sarsatabft«
ADVICE TO THE AGED
Affe bring» Inflrmltlca, auch a a alugglata
bow el a, weak kldneya and torpid liver.
Tuffs Pills
I have a specific effect on these organs,
stimulating the bowels, yli es natural action,
and imparts vigor to the whole sytaem.
DEFIANCE Gold Wafer Starch
makes laundry work a plaasura. It os. pkg 10a
ISOS
B J
r IS THE NAME
or THE WEST MCDICINI
^^COUCMI e> COLDS

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