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The Oakley herald. [volume] (Oakley, Idaho) 1908-1961, February 24, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091130/1911-02-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE OAKLEY HERALD
VOL 15
OAKLEY, CASSIA,, COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY,
FEB. 24, 1911.
' NUMBERl
ejjtW' 1 f i*nii I*
While They Last !
Free For Every Family.
ONE VALUABLE
amilton
ousehold
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B rown
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You'll be sorry if you do not have one in your
home.
CALL AT ONCE !
Remember ! We deliver goods at your door
and guarantee satisfaction. You can't Better
the Beet.
PEOPLE'S UNION, LTD.
Oakley, Idaho.
Phone all orders to 37.
Tell your neighbors.
CiiiUfcti. aAJuU*lA.ii .tAll jiilAililAlA. .ill Lift
1
Weeter Lumber Co., Ltd.
OF OAKLEY
Yards at the Following Towns
Hagerman
Hansen
Filer
Milner
Murtaugh
Tv in Falls
Pocatello
Blackfoot
Gooding
Burley
Kimberly
Buhl
American Falls McCammon
Shoshone
Wendell
Richfield
Jerome
To Everybody Who is in Need of Any Kind of
Building Materials:
We are not intending to put a yard in
your town, for we already have one of
the best equipped yards in Cassia Coun
ty. Don't forget that your money buys
as much here as any place else. A look
over our stock will convince you of its
superiority.
it
Yours for a business year.
Weeter Lumber Co.
j
Oakley, Ida.
Telephone 6
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Ch*tr
at tfilà' i'Oaà'Oft oß t&e many
iuktUtute mak&iàr in
eohneb^ and Sy iïuyinÿ tfaciïi overstock
ÿot a eohnc\ on a Cot oÿ ÿood
f}U\nitu>ie^ Sceaux vn had the ea&h
to heCji them out. ou\ àjyeeiaC hkiees
ehaPià'^eCotheà' eaCinetà'^ehiÿjonie\&
dïeô^eïï and Sed \oom ^età v^iCC deCi~
when hound ouh way hun
in and Cook abound,
pay a CittCe now and then,
the Suf ôJobe with the CittCe pbie&y
The D. P, Thomas Furniture Co,, Oakley.
liÿht j
a
we
on
çhl you.
Suy now.
Let U« Have a Parcels Post
-
IN THREE PARTS—PART 1.
It is said that General Grant,
t Hampton's Magazine)
when shown a curious electrical
machine by which the human
voice could be transmitted many
1 miles, and was told that its in
I venter had decided to call it a
■ "telephone," displayed consider
able interest in the scientific curi
ousitv, but observed: "Very
striking, indeed, but who on
earth do you imagine is going to
use such a contrivance?"
Likewise, the legend is brought
down to us when a charier was
sought tor the first railroad in
j New England, from Boston to
1 Quincy, our New England for
bears protested vigorously
, against running a lot of noisy,
smoking, steaming iron demons
up and down the landscape. The
thoughtful Puritans declared
that existing transportanion fa
cilities were ample, and that
these locomotive monsters would
scare the cows and hens so badly
that they would decline, respec
tively, to give milk and to lav
eggs!
Those things seem merely hum
orous to us now, What would
the world think of the American
people if suca arguments had
prevailed, and throughout the
last eighty years the people of
the United States had refused to
allow railroads to he built while
every other country built them
by hundreds of thousands of
miles, and decade after decade
derived from them the tremen
dous commercial and social ad
! vantages which everybody now
recognizes.
Of course, you reply that such
a thing is absurd. Yet it is ex
actly what the people of the Uni
ted States have done in the mat
ter of transporting light parcels.
While all other nations have
supplied their people with the
best, cheapest, and most effici
ent facilities for handling this
kind of freight, through parcels
posts established and operated
by governments, the United
j States Ins persistently denied its
people the advantages of this
! system.
It is commonly said that we
j have no parcels post because the
(express companies, controlling
for private profit the package
freight business, will not permit
Congress to give the public the
facilities it wants and ought to
have. In too large part this is
I true; and it is unjust and scan*
j dalous as if the owners of toll
j roads and stagecoach lines of a
[century ago had been permitted
I to prevent this great .country
evutpping itself with railroads.
There would he some shadow
of excuse for refusing to accept
so great a convenience as the
parcels post if, in accepting it,
we would destroy a large invest
ment in the business of the ex
press companies. But, in fact,
we would not destroy any legi-Ulie
timate values in these companies,
They own practically nothing
on which they would lose a dol
lar. Most oi their money is not
in the business of transporting
freight, but in banking and in
vtstnaent enterprises. These
would not b e interfered with.
Their tangible property actually
used in transportation would be
required, and undoubtedly be
taken over at good figures bv
the government, when it estab
lished a parcels post business.
Their investments in stocks
j bonds and banking business
| would b e undistributed. The
express companies would lose
! nothing except their graft—the
! privilege of charging outrageous
rates for the service they render,
In morals and equitp that ought
to be ended as soon as possible.
The truth is that it is not the
political and financial influence
j of the express companies which
1 keeps Congress from giving this I
nation a parcels post. It is the
pathetic and benighted ignor
ance of a considerable section of
our own people, who have been
led to believe that the parcels
post would injure them. It is
I well-nigh impossible to believe
j that there can still bt millions
of intelligent Americans who
doubt that national prosperity
I must be promoted by every in
! crease of the facilities and eheap
icning of tfce cost of transpocta
tion Yet there is such a section
j of the American public. Mis-.
j
I guided and ignorant, it lias per-
niitted itself to become the chief
bulwark of protection to the ex
press companies' graft. It per
sists in believing, in the face of
P earl Y a century of world exper
tence to the contrary, that there
is danger in too easy, too cheap,
and too universal transporta
tion!
sides to the story.
' i > only human,
(Continued Next W«*«ki
A "Put Off'
Unpleasant consequences usu
ally follow a put off. Of course
you intend to start a bank ac
count with us in the near future.
Why put off until tomorrow
that which you can just as easi
ly do today? We not only ac
cept your deposits, keep your
money safely and render you
every possible accommodation
that the best books in the coun
try can render, hut we will take
care of your valuable papers and
give you our assistance in your
business transactions free of
charge. Our methods are thor
ough and'conservative,
sources abundant and our sta
bility and trustworthiness be
yond question. We
carefully after your banking in
terest and treat you with
our re
will look
every
courtesy and consideration.
Why be a "Put off?" Call today
and let u9 start you on the road
to prosperity. Let that
that is now in your pocket earn
money
you some interest tonight.
We pay 4- per cent on savings
deposits and compound the in
terest quarterly.
Farmers Commercial & Sav
ing Bank, Oakley Idaho.
Plain Talk to Parents.
"Do not fail to make allow
ance for
slight exaggerations
when hearing of pranks in school.
"Do not accuse the teacher oi
undue favoritism.
It she is kind
er to one child than to another
it's because that one does not
take
advantage of the liberty
allowed him.
This is simplejus
tice,
"Do not tell the teacher that
Willie will not lie. She
know better.
may
"Do not condemn the teacher
without a lair hearing,
accorded to even the worst crim
inal. There are
This is
Usually two
"Do not send a scathing note
to the teacher by Nellie, the
tents of which the latter knows.
con
Ho - aggressive look of triumph
is nui soothing, and the teacher
"Do
not make unfavorable
I comment upon the methoiis ol
teacher in the
jyour child.
presence ol
Send him to carry
in wood while you urc doing
it it must be done.
"Do not expect the teacher to
understand Jimmie's disposition
tlie first day. You have studied
it lor six years and there are still
kinks in it which you huved fail
ed to straighen out.
"Do not plead lack of time to
visit tue school. There is no ex
cuse for shirking a duty.
"Do not reproach the teacher
with the tact that 'Tommy has
not learned a single thing the
entire year. She is not respon
sible for his lack of brains,
"Do not send a verbal request
to have Jennie's seat changed.
There is often no vacant seat
and one change usually means
at least a half a dozen,
"Do not forget that the teach
er's interest in your child is per
sonal. She will do more to help
him than any one except your
self,
80,
"Do not expect the teacher to
manage without friction a child
whom you yourself have never
been able to control.
"Do not insist that the teach
er i s keeping your child back
through spite. She will hardly
risk her leputation as an instru
ctor to gratify a personal grudge
however disagreeable the child
may be.
"Do not forget that the par
ents owe a duty to the teacher
just as surely as the teacherdoes
to the child."
Last September
to hold good until further notice: "Tbmatoes.Gorri,
Peas and Beans, 10c per can; Oysters, 10c and
20c per can; Sardines. 5c and 10c per cap; Sego
Milk, 5o and 10c per can; Kingston!'» Corn, and
Silver Gloss, Starch, at I0c per package; Ke ogg'z
Corn Flakes, 10c per package; Walter Baker's
Chocolate, 20c. per cake,
been withdrawn,
never undersold, quality considered, and that
your children can do just as well as you can.
5'
»
These prices have not
Please remember that
we are
:
TERMS CASH.
flbnce'e.
agjrra.JU.ST
COM MON^CEN T5
THAT MAKE
COMMON DOLORS
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Save a pait of the money you make and put it iu the
bank. Just put five dollars a week in our bank, and in
twenty-five years this will be a snug fortune.
To the borrower, as well as to the lender, we offer this in
ducement,; the soundness of our long years of business in
this community and all reasonable courtesies to our patrons.
MAKE OUR BANK YOUR BANK.
The Old Reliabe,
I
THE OAKLEY STATEJBANK,
The Bank with the Backing."
a
Milner Drug Co.
Milner, Idaho
When in Milner make it a point
to dall on us.
We carry a complete line of
Drugs, Candies, Toilets, Etc.
Sarah E. Lynch
Hotel Grinnell
Milner, Idaho
James Tada, Prop.
Milner, Idaho.
BOARD AND LODGING
Good Meals and Comfort
able Rooms
Meals at all Hours
Good Service and Courte
ous Attention
Good Home Cooking
Meals at all hours.
RATES REASONABLE
WE DEAL IN QUALITY!
If you want good goods at right
prices, trade with us.
\Ve handle a complete line of sta
ple Groceries, Hardware, American
Fence, Stoves, Ranges, Etc.
Longenberger & Belmont Co.
Milner, Idaho.

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