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The Oakley eagle. [volume] (Oakley, Idaho) 1901-1908, September 28, 1905, Image 1

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THE OAKLEY EAGLE
NUMBER 28
OAKLEY, CASSIA COUNTY, IDAHO. THURSDAY, SEPT. 28. 1905.
VOLUME
Arid f arising.
We are firmly convinced that
the getting of water on the thou
sands of acres in snake-river val
ley, is not the only way ol solv
ing the problem of making these
rich lands profitable. Not many
hence hundreds and thou
years
sands of acres above the canal
lines will be successfully farmed
When that
without irrigation,
time comes, hundreds of our
farmers who are to-day scramb
anoth
ling and running over one
get land under the canal
er to
and suffering every privation to
meet the payments of such lands
and water, will condemn them
selves lor not having filed on a few
hundred acres of bench land and
learned thru wisdom and experi
how to successfully farm
en ce
such lands,
mean
ing done on every side of us and
conferring with those who aie
verv successful in
Bv wisdom we
the reading bi what is lie
this line of
work.
Down the river a little way to
the north there are the Gibson
boys— the editors of the Gem
state Rural— who are telling in
the columns of their paper their
actual success as practical
own
1-1
actual success as practical
own
arid farmers, and a little way to
the south at Lova : Utah there
are the Utah Agncultual boys
Widtsoe and Merrill the editors
of the Deseret Farmer who are
telling exactly the same story
with reference to their 6000A.
Now
dry farm in Juab County,
these men have wedded science
and are putting
and practice
forth every week most excellent
papers which if persued by
farmers would result in giving a
great impetus to the agricultual
interest of the west.
Not only are these gentlemen
experience but
our
giving their own
they are giving the experience of
dozens of other practical, success
To read their pa
ful farmers,
pers, makes one feel that this is
indeed a "farming age" and that
no field offers more inducements
to day than does that of agricul
Of agricultural pursuits
ture.
there is none surer than that of
arid farming.
Most of the people of this re
presume have traveled
Western Cache Valley, and
gion we
over
have noted the dry bench lands
near Cache Junction. More un
inviting, more barren, more des
olate hill sides would be hard to
find. And yet these same hill
sides have been taken up in re
am! thru careful and
cent years
scientific agriculture have been
made to produce abundantly
without irrigation.
One of the most successful far
mets of the west Hon. George L.
Farrell of Smithfield Ut. is the
who has been largely in
man
strumental in making this prac
tical demonstration near Cache
His dry farm there
made him a
Junction,
has practically
For that reason
wealthy man.
have reproduced in another
column a letter of advice to far
in Utah from his pen with
we
mers
the belief that the same advice
will apply equally well to the
farmers in Idaho, and with the
hope that it will bear good fruit
in Cassia County.
ADVICE TO F,
(From the Logan Republican.)
By George L. Farrell.
Now is the titne to prepare
fallowed land lor sow
summer
ing tall wheat. See to it that
the ground is well pulverized and
free from weeds and trash of
every description, before you un
dertake to sow grain. Then
procure the very best of seed viz:
Gold Coin or the Winter Lasalle,
but if possible procure the Gobi
Coin if you have to go one or
two hundred miles to get it, as
it is the best vielder and the best
milling wheat in the market,
also the best dry farm wheat in
the state. It has a good stiff
straw about 3 feet long, does
not lodge or rust and will sell
readily from one to three cents
per bushel more than any other
kind of wheat in the market,
and will yield from 3 to 5 bushel
more per acre, and the straw is
good for feeding stock in the
winter. Therefore, my advice to
all farmers is, sow the Gold Coin
Winter Wheat, as it is a nice
white grain and all millers are
seeking it, find the wheat mer
chants are buying it in prê
tera nee to any other kind. It is
very hardy and stands the win
ter well. If sown any time from
Sept. 1st to Oct. 15th will get
well rooted in any land that is
well pulverized and • free from
weeds. My advise to all dry
farmers is to commence to plow
your ground that you wish to
summer fallow as soon as pos
sible this fall, not less than eight
inches deep, aud if you can -pos
sibly do so, subsoil the same 6
inches deeper which will make
1-1 inches in depth to receive all
the moisture that may fall
the moisture that may fall
through tht winter; leave the
ground rough until spring for
the frost and snow to fertilize
through the winter, then in the
spring soon as the ground is dry
enough, go over it cross-wise
with your disk, and lengthwise
with the harrow, and continue
disking and harrowing at inter
vals through the summer to kill
fill weeds and pulverize the soil
perfectly so fis to preserve all the
moisture possible; then a short
time before sowing put on yOur
lcveler and level the surface nice
ly, previous to sowing the
wheat. My advice to all far
mers, especially? those who have
dry farms is to sow fall wheat
in Sept, and none later than
Oct. 15th. After this time, wait
till spring, then work over the
soil with disk harrow and level
er, aud sow in March if possible,
with New Zealand spring wheat
but not sow later than April
15th to raise a satisfactory crop.
Then all your summer fallowed
land that was not plowed last
fall commence as early as pos
sible while the ground is moist,
but not too wet. Plow deep
and thoroughly pulverize the soil
through the summer months as
before stated, and unless some
unforseen thing happens you are
almost sure of a good crop.
I am receiving dozens of letters
askiug so many questions that
it would take fill my time to an
swer them, I therefore have con
cludrd to write and answer all
these questions and give such in
formation that is necessary at
intervals through the season
each year and have them publsh
ed in The Logan Republican
which has promised to print
them regularly, therefore send
me your subscriptions and I will
have them entered upon the list.
I have received 8 letters today
asking the questions which I wall
answer in this issue of the paper.
I recommend farmers to sow on
dry farms from 30 to 40 lbs. per
the
all
it
a
acre and GO to 72 lbs. on irriga
ted lands.
I find the Danielson Double
Disk plow and subsoil attach
ment a splendid implement and
er sily handled. 4 good horses
will run it and plow 5 or 6 acres
per day when the ground is rea
sonably moist, the same team
will plow and subsoil half that
amount by taking off one disk
and put on subsoiler, which can
be done in 10 minutes or less and
the off horse will be walking up
on the solid ground, which can
not be done with a subsoiler
alone. Some farmers burn their
stubble before plowing,
should never be done. Plow it
uuder and reap the benefit,
consider the superior disk drill,
far better than a shoe drill, as it
much more room for the
This
I
gives
seed to spread in falling while
the shoe drill drops the seed so
dose that its roots draw the
moisture from the ground so
much quicker than where it has
more room to spread.
Haul your straw out and
spread over your fields for the
attic to eat through the winter,
so that ail your land gets the
benefit of the manure. Some
people carelessly let their stock
to the straw' stack and feed
through winter, which is not
economy, far better pay a man
$1.00 per head to haul it out
and spread it for them to eat
which will give the small cattle
the same chanee as the large
ones and make them all a good
bed, and have the manure spread
all over the field evenly.
I hope the farmers will be
united in sowing wheat of the
run
same color so that if it is mixed
it will not be dockin price, as
red and white wheat is not
marketable.
Yours for good grain, good
crops, and good markets,
Geo. L. Farrell,
Smithfield, Utah.
to
at
in
The School Opening.
The schools are open again;
the streets are gay with bright
dresses and swinging satchels,
and they have the right of way.
Around the school houses are
swarms of little humanity and
the chatter is as though a wilder
ness of mocking birds were bold
ing a convention. There is no
finer sight; there is no sweeter
There they are on the
in
music.
threshold, not a care in their
lives, not a thought in their
minds but of hope and a future
filled with gladness. They do
not realize how swiftly the years
are hurrying them on, what a
little while it will be when those
that are facing the heat of the
day now will be pushed aside,
and they will have to pick up
the burdens and carry? them.
What a farce-comedy this life is
anyway; how swift the acts,
how soon the curtain will be
rung down and the whole play
will be forgotten. Goodwin's
Weekly.
Thomas Huxley's Definition of
Education—
That man, I think, has a
liberal education whdse body
has been so trained in youth
that it is the ready servant of
his will, and does with ease and
pleasure all that, as a mechan
ism, it is capable of; whose intel
lect is a clear, cold, logic engine,
with all its parts of equal stren
gth and in smooth running order; j
ready, like a steam engine, to be
turned to any kind of work and
» >
well as *
to spin the gossamers as
forge the anchors of the mind;
whose mind is stored with the
knowledge of the great funda
mental truths of nature and the
laws of the operations; one who,
no stunted ascetic, is full of life
and fire, but whose passions
have been trained to come to
heel by' a vigorous will, the ser
vant of a tender concience; one
who has learned to love all
beauty, whether of nature or of
art, to hate all vileness, and to
esteem others as himself.
Better to be »Good Father Than
President.
President Roosevelt, amidst all
his cares, finds time to devote to
his boys, and once every summer
he takes them out on a camping
expedition. This year they all
boarded a boat and went off to
some spot on Long Island, where
camp was pitched entirely out of
the world, no one hut Private
Secretary Loeb knowing where
the family had gone. When the
boys grow up, every last one of
them will he found loyal in the
highest degree to their father
There are many fathers who
wonder why it is that their boys
manifest but little interest in
them. These might learn a les
son from the president. Boise
Statesman.
Level Headed Proposition.
A well known writer remarks
that if you own a farm and are
out of debt, don't work your
self and wife into premature
self and wife into premature
graves for the sake of getting
more land and making more
money. You have but one life
to live and it is a very brief one
at the best. Take a little com
fort as you go along day by day
and try to do a little good to
others. A morbid insatiate de
sire to own the earth, to grab
everything in sight, lies at the
foundation of more unhappiness
in the world than any other
thing. After you are gone the
world will not long remember
you by the size of the estate you
left behind you, but a good life
well lived will keep your memory
green.
In
Chinese Treatment of- Animals.
They
mule that in the hands of a for
eigner would he useless or dan
gerous to those about it becomes
in the p «session of a Chinaman
as a lamb. We never beheld arun
punish; hence a
never
away, a jibing or a vicious mule
in a Chinaman's era
or pony
ploy ment, but found the same
rattling, cheerful pace maintain
ed over heavy or light roads, by
means of a tur-r or cluck-k, the
beast turning to right or left,
and stopping with but a hint
from the reins. This treatment
is extended to all the animals
they press into the service. Ol
ten have I admired the tact ex
hilrted in.getting a large drove
of sheep through narrow, crowd
ed streets and alleys, by merely
having a little boy lead one of
the quietest of the flock in front;
the others steadily followed.
Cattle, pigs and birds are equally
trained.
a
j the kindest people in the world
be in their treatment of them,
Geo. T. Angell.
We met in paris in 1SG9 Mr.
Burlingame, who was then our
minister to China. We ask him
whether a society for the pre
vention of cruelty to animals
ought not to be formed in China.
His reply was that there was no
such thing in China as cruelty to
animals; the Chinese were about
* *
77
EAGLE CLUb
s F R E E T
IDAHO.
M A I N
o A K I, V,
to
all
of
to
FINE WINKS. LIQUORS and CIGARS
O L A U K LEE, Proprietors
JOHN N. PRICE
-I) K A L K It I N
Dry Goods, Groceries, Shoes, Hardware , Notions, Etc.
Prices the Lowest, Goods the Highest Quality
Corner Main Street and Blaine Avenue, §
§ OAKLEY, IDAHO
Cassia Stahe Hcafrcm^,
all
to
all
to
of
the
of
the
in
les
Qaklcy, flfrabo.
O ff e r s d u r ing t h e p resent y e ar:
U?) Three A'eai s Normal Coure. (3)
( 1) Elementary Courses in Agricul
(5) Thorough Courses
(1) a Prepartory Course,
Three Years Science Course,
ture, Domestic Science, Manual Training,
in Vocal and Instrumental Music.
For catalogue or information, address the Principal.
J. J. mum AND SONS
E CARRY the celebrated Bain and Cooper Wag
ons, also Racine
Ilesse Buggies. Buggy
Goods in Season Always on Hand. Investigate*^
prices before buying elsewhere.
w
Enterprise, Col"mbits and
Harness tovjnatcb.
Hain Sired, oahicsj, ifidw.
S E P T E M B E R the 121 h.
are
life
one
com
day
to
de
Watch for the Date. We will op
line of winter hats. If we
en up our
cannot please you, tell us what you
want and we will make it for you.
Mrs. C. C. Nelson, Oakley, Ida.
mm ~ Bum
STAGE LINE
•lay.
Daily Except S
Sta#»' Loaves Oakley for Burley.K a m.
.13 m.
Arrives at Burley...,
Hta|{«< Leaves Burley for Oakley . ~ P-m.
.ft p.m.
Arrives Oakley.
Hound trip, $2.50
Fare one Way, $1.50
AH
Fifty pounds of Basil lie allowed free.
In excess at rule of V
Leave and call for
Co-op.
■nt.s per hundred.'
ll express at. Oakley
Minimum chante 25 cunts.
H. J. WELLS, Proprlet,
B. P. HOWELLS
Attorney at Law
oakley , Idaho.
DERBYSHIRE & DUNN,
Attorneys and
Counsellors at Law.
Offices .—ALBION and OA K LE Y,
IDAHO.
George Parkinson
Painting, Kalsomining
and Paper Hanging
First-Class Work
OAKLEY, :: :: IDAHO
NEW BLACKSMITH SHOP
hi MdtioN. min«
We have tools for all kinds of work
Can weld anything from a fork tyne
to a four-inch shaft. All kinds of
wagon repairs kept in stock :: ::
^HORSESHOEING A SPECIAETV=
We guarantee to set shoes so as to
prevent Interfering or overreaching
G I V F. US A TRIAL
ROBINSON Ai JOHNSON
MARION
IDAHO
Gorringe & Reed
Dealern in and
Manufacturera of
Harness and Saddles, Gloves,
Whips, Spurs, Etc.
► OGO
Cal! and see our Stock before
buying elsewhere
o A K L E Y , I D A B u
R. T.OLSEN
Tonbörial Artist
Courteous attention, prompt service
Bath room in emu cel ion
OAKLEY. IDAHO
-- « -——
OAKLEY PHARMACY
WORTHINGTON & ELISON, Props.
Drugs
Stationery
Druggists' Sundries
Proprietory Remedies
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded
J. W. S. EMERSON, M. D
PHYSICIAN ANI) SURGEON
Office over Oakley Pharmacy.
OAKLEY.IDAHO
a. f. o. nielson, m. u.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Oakley Pharmacy.
Office Hours: 10 am. to 2 p.m. and 4 to ft p.m
OAKLEY, IDAHO
DR. N. RAY MECHAM
DENTIST
Office located over Hannberg s Drug Sion
Office hours, 8::» to 12 a.m. and 1 to 5 p.m
IDAHO
OAKLEY

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