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The Oakley eagle. [volume] (Oakley, Idaho) 1901-1908, October 26, 1905, Image 1

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THE OAKLEY EAGLE
VOLUME 9.
OAKLEY, CASSIA COUNTY, IDAHO. THURSDAY,
OCT. 26, 1905.
NUMBER 81
j
The Schools Again.
We call attention to the splen
did article in these columns from!
the pen of J. A. White of Twin
It is worthy the careful
Falls.
consideration of every citizen of
Cassia county. We would like
to have nothing but praise for
everything that concerns our
county for we realize that gom
me ndation and praise are stim
ulating and that censure fre
guentlv has tlie opposite effect,
but when it comes to the educa
tional conditions of our county
it seems to us that we are hardly
worth praising. Perhaps we
think we are doing fairly well,
but we certainly tire not doing
well enough, Our school-build
ings, our apparatus, our teachers
in many instances are not up to
date. Our school terms are al
together too short in rfiany dis
tricts, and our students are, as a
general rule, four years short of
where they should be.
Cassia Stake Academy lias a
large class of bright intelligent
young men and women—stud
ents of such calibre as should—if
they had proper advantages
would now be doing college in
stead of high school work. Four
teen to eighteen are the high
The high sthool
That these
young people are backward isno
fault of their own. Thev have I
school years,
students here range from 1G to
22. An average age of those do
ing first and second year high
school, we fire confident, would
be at least 18 years.
not been put in graded schools
and kept there in the time and
season thereof. We hope the
conditions will be remedied. We
invite also such correspondence
as that of today—not only on
matters educational, but on fill
matter's that pertain to the de
velopment of Cassia and the
welfare of her citizens.
Interesting Communication on
(School Matter.
Twin Falls, Oct. 13,'05
Mr. A. M. Merrill,
Editor Oakley Eagle.
Dear Sir:—I have just finished
reading the article in your paper
of the fifth instant, from County
Superintendent Charles R. Lowe,
anent the condition of the
schools in our county; together
with your article,—"A Crying
Need."
As a teacher, and a citizen, in
terested in the improvement of
the educational conditions in
our county, I want to say that,
in the main, I approve what you
anil Mr. Lowe have to say on
this subject, and I sincerely hope
that the agitation for better j
schools will continue until Cas- 1
in a j
position to boast of a school j
system second to none
sia county will be
in the
j
Superintendent Lowe, in his
letter, states there are two vital J
problems to be considered before
attempts to remedy other de- j
attempte d. viz: I
"Great New-West."
tects are
"Length of Term,''and, "Getting I
the Children to School." I heart
I
ily agree with the superintend
ent that the two problems men
tioned are, perhaps, the most
important. However, I would
change the order, and put first:
* 'Getting the Children in School."
This; in my opinion, is the great
est problem school, officials of
our county have to deal with.
The absolute indiflerence of some
parents to school matters is as
appalling as it is incredible,
deed, there are still those in
county who even go so far as to
oppose school entirely,—contriv
ing all kinds of excuses for keep
ing children out ol school. Fortu
In
our
j nately, however, these are few.
While a seven or eight months
tci 1,1 sc- ' u>0 ^ * s desirous, and,
' tu ^ et ' t ', tjuite necessary to attain
^ le nU)St satisfactory result, I
believe that a four qf five months
term of continuous and regular
attendance, with a good, well
equipped teacher, modern ap
paratus, backed by the interest
and co-operation of parents,
guardians and school officers, is
far better than a seven or eight
months term with a "good, well
equipped teacher," and poor,
out of-date apparatus, and an
indifferent .lot of parents, guard
ians and school officers. An in
different parent, an indifferent
child, An
indifferent teacher,
say this should not be .so; that
it is the teacher's business to al
ways be "alive and enthusiastic."
While this is quite true, it must
be remembered that teachers are
only human, and where is the
teacher that can go into some of
the "old,backwoods settlements"
of our county, and
thusiastic" in the face of condi
tions and opposition? If there
are any I would like to get a
peep at them.
While 1 believe it is encumbent
upon parents (and other citizens
as well) to make some sacrifice,
if necessary, for the education of
their own, and 'their
children, I would not advocate
their going to. the extreme of
mortgaging their farm
ing their last cow." This should
indifferent child, fin
Some will
remain en
neighbors'
or "sell
not be necessary, and if done,
might imperil' their home,
and
upon them a worse condi
t r
STTFian the lack of an educat
ion. This, however, is no argu
ment for the majority of districts
in Cassia county that have
font- five months school, and less
If I am not mistaken, nearly all
of the districts referred to,
contain men. of considerable
means, when the special assess'
ment of five, ten, or even fifteen
mills would not inconvenience in
the least, and this special
ment would amply provide for
and
assess
all
scho o'l
purposes
would soon accumulate a sur
plus. But as I said before, the
first, and more important thing
is to get the child i
That is the "Crying Need".
Let something be done to
arouse the people to the impor
tance of education for their
n school.
children. I well remember
first experience in teaching
school. It was in a newlv
organized district and where the
finish the district school
and,my every effort was being,
put forth to
to continue their education in
mv
people were, for the greater part
uneducated. I had several large
boys and girls who would soon
course
encourage them
some higher institution of leafn
ing. Of course the agitation of
the college appealed strongly to
them, and the matter was taken
up at their homes,
was that I was brought into the
discussion
The result
with the parents
over it. The statements of two
heads of families will serve to
illustrate the -attitude of the
people on the subject, and is
I think tvical to all communities
Both men were uneducated so
far as "book learing" goes, but
were thrifty and progressive,
and had accumulated a '•uffic
ient amount of this world's
goods to keep lliem in comfort
able circumstances. Both were
able to expend something in the
education of their children. One
was enthusiasm itself, on all
matters pertaining to the school
and declared that: "I never had
a chance to go to school myself.
I have no education but I re
solved
vears ago that my child
not grow up like I
I don't blame mv parents,
because they couldn't do any
better, but I can do better, and
mv children would have a riy:ht
to blame me if I didn't. It I live
and keep my health, thev shall
not grow up, ignorant". The
other man was indifferent to the
school and its interests. Hut
what he said will convey to my i
idea of what
ren would
did.
I
readers a better
sort of man lie
1 le said: i
was.
Schooling may be all right for
lawyers, doctors
find school'
teachers, but it don't help
pitch hay or shear sheep,
children can read and
figure a little, that's enough. I
never went to school myself and
I never failed to make a living
vet, and if my boys can't do the
same, thev can
to
If my !
write and
starve'
I have
quoted the above fis near as I J
can remember it and I dare
my fellow teachers will
that it is typical of the two ck
is "I people they have to deal
witii in school matters. The j
forniet class is I believe, in the
niajoi iii ' ut the latter class is far I
too nu nierons.
si iv
fierce
- ass -1
Let
something
- number;
nay, to eliminate them entirely!
Let us not permit them to blight
the lives of their children,
allowing them to
ignorance!
be done to lessen their
by Î
grow up in !
citiren i, ^ , ,gnorant !
ut«en ls the curse of the state
u ,, :
v «Hi means tlic chilHrpti
. , , , 1 c ren
in school find keep them there !
ri«î™,, u, ,■ , 1 e
during the entire schoo term
Tf h,. , jnn. j
*i no oilier means tHpti pnfni*pp
n entorce,
the compulsory attendance law
T.ïr. ,,,,, ,t, ' ,
loo much praise cannot be
given th^e-. citizen, „I Strict'
ti:..i.t. <1. w ,„ tv
recently ^petitioned the'bounty
. UI,L - V
commissioners to increase the
„ ,v, ,, c Lllt
school levy sufficient to enable a
, enciuic
nine months school to be held in i
*i, ■ • ' CiU in
their respective districts Let
L nn „ .
h0pe w.ll manife.t
the 8 ? mt ., ,n Ml "'~ rlin «
the school for tl< number ol
months they now lu
the same
ive.
us build good
school houses; supply first-u*
apparatus; put a real, live,
petent teacher in charge; get the
children to go
time; get the cooperation of the
parents, and results will be forth
coming, whether there is a term !
of^three, four, five
months.
Finally, let
es
com
regular, and
on
or nine ■
!
Success to the county
tendent and all others
efforts to
superin
in their
raise the educational j
standard of our county.
Very truly yours,
j
J ACK W- White,
Good Words for Cassia.
The Oakley correspondent to
the Deseret News, relates among
other things this interesting bit
of history:—
The almost unequalled advan
tages of southern Idaho may be
estimated by the following: One
gentlemen moved to this state
less than eight years ago with ;
scarcely enough means to pay
his transportation, but he saw
tlic opportunity offered to enter
(»rise JHld industry; he rented
ow roofed log !,„„*■ nod began
life on the ground Hour and to
day that man can count Ids :
wealth by the thousands; houses,
lands and money of his own in I
abundance, with a vast field of
possibilities inviting him on to
boundless prosperity,
is only one cireumstaftce in many
that might be cited of a similar
nature. All testifying of the in
trin-ic value of homes and the !
And this
reward of industry in the Gem
state.
Men living in crowded
cities, or working day labor for
a scant living, as well as
young
men employed in stores and oth
er concerns could not do better
then venture out into these new
districts, and "grow up with the
country." Every SO-aere tract
of land under this irrigating sys
tem will be worth $5,U0U in five
years. From tins viewpoint of
possibilities in Idaho, Cassia
county is in the lead and will!?
take on a larger and more per
i manent growth in the next 10
years than any ocher locality ol
i the west.
Brief and Breezy.
(By our Associât' Editor.)
Gen. Gomez is now ''viewing
with alarm." He is apparently
the Brvan of Cuba.
!
A nephew ofGassaway Davis
who has been working "incog
nito" in the steil mines has dis
Probablv he is in
J appeared,
scheme to kjdnap JohnD. Rocke
j feller and hold him for $2,000,
000 ransom, but had to abandon
I it bee use lie
hiding find intends sometime to
run *' or vice-president'incognito.'
Pat Crowe savs he had a
could not get a
trusty pal. Wonder if he offered
the job to Tom Lawson?
This contention that there never
was an angel with whiskers,
looks like a personal thrust at
Dr. Parkhurst and Dr, Dowie.
The Mutual Life has paid Presi
. i , .
dent McCurdy and members ofhis
^ •. . .
family something over $4,000,
aha * . , . .
000 in salaries andcommissions,
'n . . .
One purpose of the investigation
i
seemstobetoshowthat "Violet"
r ,t , ,, -, ,,
Jimmy Hyde was a mere "piker"
-
"P 1 *
Some n,™ ,-ire l,,«^,. S o w
."'T' ,
jobs under their fathers in the
Yr •
life insurance office.
e i
Some day, let us hope, tile-eol
i -n i
lege will produce a graduate
i ■ i -,
who is a happy compromise be
the f 0 ,! t b a ll player who i s
all brawn and the physical wreck
, vh „
get
Count Witte will probably go
down in history as the man who
saved the Russian bear from be
ing skinned, after it had been
licked to a standstill.
Mr. Thos. Ryan of N. V. has
engaged a private chaplain. As
Mr. Ryan has been dabbling in
'ik insurance
syndicates, the
private chaplain has a big job
cut out for him.
Young Leonard who secured
$360,000 worth of securities
N. Y. bank by working a bluff,
ought to try and get his case be
fore a jury composed of dummy
directors of life insurance com
punies.
M. Witte has one cause for
congratulation,
by both birth and "trains" from
being made a Russian grand
duke.
He is barred
the Finnish constitution and
tablish martial law in Finland,
If reports are true, the Finns
will have difficulty in noticing
any difference.
-The only trouble now to 1*
1>e leared . i s thut hclure ,
win be plentiful"
„ N. V. report. The public « ill
refuse to he scared,
-- - -
w ¥ o e* *1
^ * A * vL»3ÉiN
Russia threatens to abolish
tv
Tonsorial Artist
Courteous attention, prompt service
Bath room in connection
OAKLEY, IDAHO
"=r
B. P. ITOWELLS
Attorney at Law
OAKLEY, IDAHO
!
T> t-tp»* :.«■!
G

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£
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-
M >«<4 mot
'■'WOWO-t .r&t n.'-;
;
©aklev f&barmacç»
? .
CARRIES A FULL LINE OF
Drugs, Fancy Stationery, Sundries, Proprie- *
I ary Remedies, Combs, Hairbrushes, Candies, f
Soaps, etc. A Fine line of Cigars Just i
Treatment best. Prices lowest.
11XH. fliy.Mortbtnjton, «
Proprietor.!^
m.
I
6 6
EAGLE CLUB
n
M A ! N S r i: K E T
OAKLEY, IDAHO.
FINE WINES, E1QUORS and CIGARS
OLA UK LEE,
Proprietor«
JOHN N. PRICE
- DEALEU IN
Dry Goods, Groceries, Shoes, Hardware, Notions, Etc.
Prices the Lowest, Goods the Highest Quality
Corner Main Street and Blaine Avenue, § g OAKLEY, IDAHO
j. j. mum m sons
W E CARRY the celebrated Bain and Cooper Wag
ons, also Racine, Enterprise, Columbus and
Hesse Buggies. Buggy Harness to match.
Goods in Season Always on Hand. Investigate our
])rices before buying elsewhere.
_
-1
Main sireel, Osfeieg, [flats«.
MILLINERY, MILLINERY.
Please step in and see our Ladies
Waist and Skirts, Ladies & Childrens
Underwear. Union Suits for Lad
ies. We will try to please you with
a Hat if it takes all day.
Mrs. C.C.Nelson, Oakley, Ida.
| }
©When the
Most Particular®)
x
ItBusinerfan
#
©
Endeavors to(G>)
lease
© His Most Particular®
HCustomer
© He Advertises [email protected]
iTHE OAKLEY EAGEL f
in
DELBYSHIRK DUNN.
Attornevs and
Counsellors at Lav/.
Offices ALBION ami OA KLE V,
IDAHO.
NEW BLACKSMITH SHOP
AT MARION. IDAHO
We have tools for all kinds of work
Can weld anythin« from a fork tyne
to » four-inch shaft. All k I n d s of
WaKoii repair« kept la «toc k :: ••
=H#KSESHOEINfi \ SPECIALTV=
We guarantee to set shoes so as to
prevent Interfering or overreaching
GIVE U h A T8IA L
ROBINSON At JOHNSON
MARION
IDAHO
Gorringe & Keed
Dealers in and
Manufacturers of
Harness and Saddles, Gloves,
Whips, Spurs, Etc.
ooo
Cal! and sec our Stock before
buying elsewhere
OAKLEY,IDAHO
OAKLEY -- BIßLEV
STAGE LINE
Daily Except Sunday.
Sta,.'« Leaves l)akl«y for Hurley. 8
Arrives at Burley
Staue Le
Arrives Oakley
..ID.
12 ru
is Burley for Oakley.2 p.,n.
8 p.m.
I'uro one Way, 81.60
Round trip, $8.50
I'lfty pounds of Hogg age allowed free,
in excess at rate of
AH
cents per hundred.
Leave and call for all express
cents.
at Oakley
Co-op.
Minimum charge
H. J. WELLS, Proprietor
J. W. S. EMERSON, M. I)
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Offlup over Oakley Pharmacy,
OAKLEY. I D A H O
A. F. O. NIELSON, M. I).
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Oakley Pharmacy.
Office Hours: lu a.m. to 2 p.m. ami 4 to 8
O A K L E Y ,
p.m
IDAHO
DR. N. RAY M ECU AM
DENTI ST
Office located over Hannherif's Drug Store
Office hours 8:38 to 12
a.m. and 1 to 6 p.m
OAKLEY,
IDAHO

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