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The Oakley eagle. [volume] (Oakley, Idaho) 1901-1908, February 15, 1906, Image 1

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THE OAKLEY EAGLE
NUMBER 2
OAKLEY, CASSIA COUNTY, IDAHO, THURSDAY, FEB. 15, 1906.
VOLUME 10.
ceed
Its Too Bad-But I
Cannot Help You.
So Says Engineer Ross to Set
tlers on the South Side.
On Thursday afternoon last
fully 300 settlers met in the
Opera House at Burley to hear
what Engineer Ross had to say
reference to reclamation of lands
the south side of the river.
It was the regular meeting day
of the "Settlers League" but Mr
Ed wards,chairman having learn
ed that Mr Ross purposed
meeting with the settlers invited
him to be present, and gave the
meeting over to the citizens en
masse.
Mr L H. Sweetser was made
chaiman and E. G. Barber was
chosen secretary. It became the
duty of Mr Frank Riblett to
introduce th.- distinguished gentle
man. Mr Ross gave the audience
oneof his sweetest grins, and fa
cetiously explained that l e took
his position directly in front ot
thesecretary that the l itter might
take down all that he said. He
reminded the audience,also, that
he is a constant reader of the
Burley Bulletin. He began by
stating that he presumed his
hearers were desirous of having
him ex plain away their difficulties
but that unfortunately, he was
unable to do so. With this re
mark, the ever present hope, van
quished from the poor home
steaders heart, and he patiently,
sorrowfully, listened to his
doom.
Mr Ross expained that no de ve
lopment work ever undertaken
so completely touched human
interests as that of irrigation;
that men must precede irrigation
and this precedence usually in
volves sacrifices and hardships;
that the reclamation service had
absolutely no personal interests
in settlement and that the settle
ment was made upon the settlers
own responsibility; frequently
without any investigation; that
three vears ago when the prelim
inary arrangements for the recl
amation of the lands were made
that there was not a living soul
upon them, and that within the
past years the people had spread
all over them and without in
quiry.
He then went on to explain the
work of the reclamation engineers
the construction of the dam and
gravity system, and also the
plan for the establishment of
pumping ditches. That thegrav
ity lands will be provided for by
May 1st, but that no definite
time could be given for the com
pletion of the pumping system.
"We have continued with our
planfromthe very beginning with
out cessation but we are not
authorized to make any promises,
It would be absurd for us to do
so. All that has been said, hoped
guessed at has not changed the
orginal plans one iota. The
government|will|reclaim thejlands
as soon as possible but it is not
making any promises. Approx
imately 800 acres will be under
gravity ditches and 50000 acres
under tile pumping system. If
we had tile money we could com
plete the works, but we haven't
the mont}'. Sixteen states have
reclamation projects—most 0 f
them several projects and it is
the desire of the government to
treat all as fairly as possible."
Mr Ross regretted that so
much criticism and fault finding
were extant and suggested that
the reclamation service and the
people might come to a better
understanding if an organization
effecting the who project were
ed.
Mr
on
ed.
o{
of
Y
formed. Suggested that a com
mittee of three be appointed to
meet with 9 others selected from j
other parts of the tract and that
these twelve representative pro
ceed to form an organization.
After some discussion this was
agreed upon and Messrs Riblett,
Rohrbach and Cranerwere nam
ed.
Questions were aske d but the
people got no further satisfaction.
Mr Ross maintained that the
service was doing all they could
and would continue to do so.
But that making promises or
becoming interested in any
particular part of the tract was
outside of their business. The
gentleman was'tendered a vote ot
thanks for his presence and talk
and the meeting was adjourn
ed.
D. W Ross.
Considerable critic sm has
been passed by the press this
side of the river on the works
and movements of chief engineer
o{ the reclamation department
As to the
of Idaho D. W. Ross.
I "top" yet
Act
so
ti
THE BEAUTIFUL KINGDOM.
There are faces alight with the glory of love
In the ' 'Kingdom of never- g row-old.
There are hearts that are light as the clear skies above
In that Kingdom of beauties untold.
And happy is he who can dwell in that land
Where children are ruling with scepters in hand.
In the "Kingdom of Never- g row old.
No sorrows lurk deep in grim thickets of gloom
In the "Kingdom of Never- g row-old.
But flowers of beauty are ever in bloom
And the pathways are shining as gold
The laughter of little one borne on the air
Is surcease of sorrow and cure for all care,
For happiness reigns and has banished
In the Kingdom of Never-grow-old, ''
1 '
is
its
in.
its
of
it
' '
The little voices in harmany call,
And their little arms wait to enfold.
And Father 'Time pauses to taste of the joys,
Io join in the games full of romping and noise
That are played all the hours by sweet girls and boys
In the "Kingdom of Never-grow-old.
Y
»
Come, walk with me note through the cool shadows deep
In the Kingdom of Never-grow-old,
And barkward the years of our trouble will creep
While stories of youth are retold.
All burdens grow light and all cares we dismiss;
The gales are unlocked by a sweet baby kiss,
And Love sits enthroned in the City of Bliss
In the Kingdom of Never-grow-old.
>>
;;
Will M, Maupin.
Dst. |
we must admit consistent \. e
answered all questions ran \
anc ^ while it was exulent t iat
his hearers were opposed in their
feelings to his recoid as they a
understood it, yet they gave.
most respectful attention.
W hether the people have iecn
wronged or not, they are
t- a * n b' * n a tffibt place and t ie\
deserve sympathy. Mr. Ross
evidently does not deni m tha 1
commodity. His bearing and
attitude are those of a cold
blooded official, and his cynic.d
smile is enough of itself to arouse
most bitter antagonism. T ere
may be times when it is proper >
sa >' " l told y° u so " or "> ou P ut
your own head in, now get it
ou ^ **• wou ^ seem to us
^at to face such an audience as
that at Burley on Thursday Last,
to look into the anxious, despair
i°g supplicating laces of from
3 to 5 hundred heads of fami
justice of these, there is much !
difference of opinion. Mr. Ross
certainly gave the settlers
straight-forward talk at their
meeting in Burley on Thursday
He talked fearlessly and
a
cer- :
lies, was enough of itself to melt
the strongest heart. It seemed
to us that Mr. Ross was unmov
ed. Peerhaps, like the surgeon,
he has become accustomed and
hardened to scenes of misfortune,
but if so we can but pity him.
Finance Looking Into Idaho.
A business man of Oakley re
ceived the following letter of in
quiry last week.
•'Knowing you have lived in
Idaho a number of years, as a
business man I thought you
must be posted in the matter
of real estate and land values,
so I take the liberty of asking a
favor. In any reply would ap
preciate the benefit of your con
servative business judgment.
Is there favorable opportunity
for investment in real estate in
your particular county or sur
rounding country? And what
do you consider a fair and rea
sonable expectation of increase
of values covering on the aver
I age say, 1, 3, 5 and 10 years?
I am informed there is at pres
I ent upward tendency, but is the
I "top" yet reached? How far off
Speaking generally what is the
_>, , t
The cousu erationofconditions
tract south of the Snake river
.
1 ra '" d *>>« . ■ » a good plan
bit to Look Before 1 ou Leap
We heard one gentle man explain
last Thursday that he and his
p ar tner came from Washington
lMt summer and , land
......
, h ^
direct influence 24 of their friends
had made similar filings. I'er
haps their friends had done like
w j se anc j i n t ha.t way a hundred
, Qr so are now so to sneak
j . . ' .
up against it. They have risked
M, Maupin.
is it? Or are values too high
Judged or
Idaho's natural resources and
guaged by
industrial conditions already
tablished what opinion is justi
fied?
es
present situation and tendency?
Look Before You Leap.
that prevail on the Minidok
a
:
and the prospects of
settlers thereon suggests to
many
otir
in
their all, and it looks now, as if
they had lost.
While we do not feel at liberty
to discuss just now the wisdom
OJ unwisdom of the filings and
risks on _the Minidoka project
we do feel justified in saying that
foolhardiness characterizes tin
American people, and that at the
merest suggestion they will run
hither and thither in great hordes
to secure the wrath of some new
ly discovered mining district or
to get located on some choice
reservation land or newly dis
T o a cer
weare a wild im
We have an in
covered arable lands,
tain extent
pulsive people,
satiable thirst for gain and do
not hesitate at all to risk our
lives and our all in greedy desires
for quick returns. It is a gen
eral and a true principle that we
get what we work lor. All rules
have exceptions and so it is with
this one.
some one that has gotten some
thing for nothing but to every
such one we may count ten who
have signally failed in their wild
ventures.
In affairs of less importance
too we can afford to be conserva
it pays in the long run.
Weigh, consider, deliberate, and
proceed cautiously and wisely.
Act well your part for not only
does the honor lie therein, but al
so ultimate success.
Once in a while we see
ti
ive.
so ultimate success.
A Cheerful Face.
(The Homestead.)
Next to the sunlight of heaven
is a cheerful face. There is no
mistaking it, The bright eyt,
the unclouded brow, the sunny
smile—all tell of that which
dwells within. Who has not felt
its electrifying influence? One
glance at his face lifts us out of
the mists and shadows into the
beautilul realms of hope. One
cheerful household will keep
everything warm and light with
in. It may be a very plain lace,
but there is something in it
we feel, yet cannot express, and
its cheery smile sends the blood
dancing through our veins for
very joy. Ah, there is a world
of magic in the plain, cheerful
face, and we would not exchange
it for all the soulless beauty that
ever graced the fairest from on
earth.
We are still taking subscriptions
to the Deseret Farmer. Those that
have already subscribed are highly
pleased with the paper. No wonder
for it is the most practical—the
best agricultural paper in the inter
mountain region.
Notice of Forfeiture.
To John Adams and Job Howell:
You are hereby notified that I
have expended (One Hundred Dol
lars) in labor and improvements upon
the Stranger mining claim, as it will
appear by certificate filed January
2nd, 1906, in the office of the Reeord
of Cassia county, in order to hold
said premises under the provisions
of Section 2324, Revised Statute of
the United Stales, being the amount
required to hold the same for the
ending December 31st, 1905,
er
year
and if within ninety days after date
of this publication, you fail or refuse
to contribute your proportion of such
expenditure,
interest in said claims will become
the property of the subscriber under
said Section 2324, Revised Statutes
as co-owners, your
of the United States.
. Mrs. Comfort H. Kinney,
Oakley. Cassia Co , Ida , Jan. 2, 1906.
Subscribe
for the-<r
'
OAKLET EAGLE
I
/
£
JOHN N. PRICE
UKA 1. E 11
Dry Goods, Groceries, Shoes, Hardware, Notions, Etc.
Prices the Lowest, Goods the Highest Quality
Jorner Main Street and Blaine Avenue,
§ § OAKLEY, IDAHO
I J. MILLARD AND SONS
E CARRY the celebrated Bain and Cooper Wag
ons, also Racine, Enterprise, Columbus and
Hesse Buggies. Buggy Harness to match
Goods in Season Always on Hand. Investigate our
prices before buying elsewhere.
w
Main Sireel, Oakley, idaho.
PHRENOLOGY.
1
j
Don't be a round peg in a square hole, a miss
fit, but get your head examined and learn
what you are capable of doing best.
Examinations oral
«•.
V
$ .75
withdescriptivechart $1.25
" book and cha. t $2.00
1
I
ALVA A. TANNER, Phrenologist
Oakley, Idaho.
FOR BARGAINS
Come to the MILLINERY STORE, we are
closing out our winter stock to make room
for our Spring Goods.
We will always give you your money's worth
in what we have left.
Mrs. C.C. Nelson, Oakley,Ida.
N. RAY MECHAM D. D. S.
DENTISTRY
Office In front parlors of Eagle Office.
Hours, » to 12 a m. and 2 to 5:30 p. m.
IDAHO
OAKLEY,
B. P. HOWELLS
Attorney at Law
OAKLEY , IDAHO.
PATENTS
I Promptly obtained or no fee. Write for our
CONFIDENTIAL LETTER before
applying for patent: it is worth money. We
obtain PATENTS THAT PAY.
and help inventors to success.
I Send model, photo or sketch, and we send
IMMEDIATE FREE REPORT ON PAT
ENTABILITY. 20 years'practice. Regis
tered Patent Lawyers. Write or come to
us at 606-507, 7th St., WASHINGTON, D, C.
I
, 60 YEARS'
L EXPERIENCE
D

a
4
A
M
■a. 5
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anvono »ending a «ketch find description m*y
quickly uncertain our ©pinion free whether an
invention in probably patentable. ( on• ninnies»
ttonsRtrictlf conrtdentlal. HANDBOOK on I aient*
sent free. Oldest agency for seen ring patent«.
Patents taken through Mutin & t o. receive
tpcrùil notice, without c harg e, in the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest otr
dilation of any scientific Journal. Terms. f3 a
-. .•ar: four months, $L Bold by all newsdealers.
ïlîiNH & Go. 361 c ' cadw!,, 'N2W York
Branch Olhoe. 626 K SU Washington, D. C.
DR. C. PETERSON,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Office at Hannberg's Drug Store.
MRS. VIRA PETERSON
M1DWIFE
Will give first-class service In all obstetric
cases.
Oakley, Idaho.
I
Gorringe & Reed
Dealers In and
Manufacturers of
Harness and Saddl es Glover,
Whips, Spurs, Etc.
ooo
Cal! and see our Stock before
buying elsewhere
OAKLEY,IDAHO
OAKLEY - BURLEY
STAGE LINE
Daily Except Sunday.
Stage Leaves Oakley for Burley
Arrives at Burley.
Stage Leaves Burley for Oakley.
Arrives Oakley.. .
8 a.m
12 m.
.2 p.m
.6 p.m
Fare one Way, $1.50
Round trip, $E.5o
Fifty pounds of Baggage allowed free. All
In excess at rate of 25cents per hundred
Leave and call for all express at Oakley
Co-op. Minimum charge 25 cents.
H. J. WELLS, Proprietor
J. W. S. EMERSON, M. D
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Oakley Pharmacy.
OAKLEY.IDAHO
•Ernest M. Dunn,
Arthur!!. Derbyshire,
DERBYSHIRE & DUNN,
Attorneys and
CODNSELLORS AT LAW.
Offices ALBION and OAKLEY,
IDAHO.
A. F. O. NIELSON, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office OTer Oakley Pharmacy.
Office Hours: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and! to 6 p-m
IDAHO
OAKLKY.

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