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The Emmett index. [volume] (Emmett, Idaho) 1893-1925, November 28, 1918, Image 8

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FIRST NATIONAL BANK
The Bank You Will Eventually Patronize.
General Banking Busi
ness Along Safe,
Conservative Lines.
ssoanAL nisenvti
kk^SVSTSM
Emmett, Idaho.
NEWS OF GEM COUNTY
By The Index's Correspondents
SOUTH SLOPE
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Harpt and j
daughter Ada motored to Boise Satur- j
day.
By Mrs. C. W. Cook
The Washington county schools did
not open Monday as was expected,
Mrs. Stinson who was to supply a va
rancy there, and Miss Grace Cook re-j
reived word in plenty of time so they
did not go. The schools will open next
week Monday.
ly, passed the examinations, received
his uniform and is on a boat training
for the merchant marines.
Winfred West reached Seattle safe
The bean threshing crew are sched
uled to thresh for C. P. Hartley this
week.
Arthur and Alice Wright visited
cousins in Caldwell several days last
week, returning Monday of this week.
HAW CREEK.
By Mr*. E. Tennyson.
Miss Marie Hanthorn came home
Monday from Weiser to visit home
folks till the ban from influenza is
lifted and her school starts again.
Mr and Mrs. Nephi Ycrgenson were
Sunuay dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Abe Yergenson,
Mrs. James Stippich left last Thurs
day for Weiser to reopen her school.
Mrs. R. E. Rose is spending the week
with Mrs. Nephi Yergenson.
Mrs. Grace Sanders and daughter
Miss Gertrude were 6 o'clock dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sanders
Andy Little brought down a large
drove of hogs from his Willow Creek
ranch to be fattened at the home
ranch.
School opened Monday with a large
attendance.
UPPER MESA
A new bell has been placed at the
schoolhouse and its pleasant tones
called the scholars to school
Monday morning.
Farmer's Union meltings will be
gin again Friday, Nov.29.
Mrs. Charles VanFleet and Mrs.
again
CHEVROLET
FOUR-NINETY
44
The Product of Experience
t
We are making a special price on the
cars that we have in stock and those who
have been wanting and needing a car
and have been putting it off until the end
of the war can now buv one at the old
price of $835.00.
Now is the time to purchase one, for
our next shipment will be at least $100.00
higher.
This i& an opportunity for you. Come
in and let us demonstrate this car to you.
We know that a ride in it will convince
you that it is the car you need.
Wilson Garage
Phone 12-J
Home of the Monroe and Chevrolet
a
»
Brogan visited with Mrs. Downing
one day last week.
Mrs. Claude Barnes and daughter
Cflatiys visited at the Loe Reed home
Thursday,
Mr. Trebles are expecting their
daughter Mrs. Allan Rinewalt, hus
Betty
j the east here to visit them. Mrs. Rine
wait is also a sister of Mrs. Loe Reed
BISSELL CREEK
By Mrs. Ward M. Fuller
Mrs. Walter Craig spent the past
w ,, ek at h ,. r m()t her'» home at Quartz
| )url{
Emmett Cooper was a caller at the
Ward Fuller home one evening last
week
Eilis Walters recently purchased 40
acres belonging to Ward Fuller.
Miss C. Procter of Emmett spent
the v eek-end at the Thos. Slone home.
W'. E. Hill and Ed Hill took Sunday
dinner at the Ward Fuller home.
Mr. Earp, of the Earp and Osgood
real estate firm of Boise, was on the
bench one day last week.
Mrs. Ward Fuller entertained at a
sumptous turkey dinner a week ago
last Sunday the Hill, Slone and Soran
families.
Thos. Slone, John Soran and Ed Hill
were Boise visitors last Friday.
Mrs. Slone and children and Mrs.
Sor.ui and children spent Friday and
Sat irdny at the W. E. Hill home.
Ward Fuller this week purchased
the -3) acres of the Craig Bros, form
erly the Nichols place, and is taking
possession at once.
LETHA
Men from the Clinton ranch are un
loading oats from a car received at
Letha last week. They also received
a huge tank of molasses and it is a
matter of some conjecture as to how
they will move it to the bench.
AI Wilson blistered his hand last
week while working on the road. It
became infected and he was under the
doctor's care for a time but is at
sent himself again.
James Kiggins moved his family to
pre
Emmett Monday, where they have tak
en rooms for the winter. They will
live in the I). and C. addition.
Eli Lanktree cf Emmett and Robert
''filler of Middleton with the boyi
made up quite a hunting party in these
parts Sunday.
Esther Lanman was soliciting for
the Children's home at Boise, Tuesday.
The men report that they will fin
ish working the roads in this district
this week. Already many words of
appreciation are heard as to the im
provement in the roads.
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Langroise and
Hazel took birthday dinner Sunday
with the Riggs family.
Mrs. Lanman and Esther and the
babies drove to New Plymouth to
trade and visit Thursday of last week.
There is a stray fat steer in Mr.
Lanman's feed lot tied up. Any one
minus one will know where to find it.
Mrs. Sadie Jones leaves tomorrow
for Ontario where she will be joined
Friday by her uncle, cousin and mother
Mrs. Fishback, who will go on to the
coast. Mrs. Jones will go to her home
at Irrigen, Ore.
Mrs. Kiggins had word of the death
of a cousin in Colorado from Spanish
Influenza,
tuONTOUR
By Mrs. R. E. Noland
School is again in session, after a
month's vacation.
The cold, frosty mornings make one
think of winter.
Dr. and Mrs. Vadney have gone to
Council to make their home.
Charlie Baldic sent two crates of
dressed turkeys to Seattle markets
Tuesday.
Mr. Scott has been doing consider
able fencing on his homestead.
Otto Schultz was a passenger on the
down train Tuesday.
Charles Henry of Dry Buck has
moved his family to this place for the
winter.
Misses Edna and Minnie Wellman
went to Emmett Sunday to resume
their studies.
Mrs. Harry Hamilton of Sweet ship
ped over nine hundred pounds of
dressed turkeys from this place last
week.
Word has been received from Mrs.
E. F. Juvenal near Pendleton, Ore.,
stating that she is in good health and
very much in love with her new home,
John Hanley, a little orphan of the
Brownlee country, is at preserit mak
ng his home with Mr. and Mrs. Swear
ingen.
Dusard Montgomery of Round Val
ley was a business caller in Montour
Tuesday.
Mrs. Victor Sheldrew and Miss
Grace Noland were callers at the
Wood home Saturday afternoon.
Mrs. Amos and Miss May Vaughn
were Emmett visitors Saturday
CAN KEEP INSURANCE
Ex-Soldier'a Policies May Be Con
Ordinary
Preparations by the government for
reinsuring the lives of soldiers and
sailors on their return have been hast
ened by signing of the armistice. Al
though regulations have not yet been
fully drafted, it is certain that each
of the 4,260,000 men in the military
naval service now holding voluntary
government insurance will be permitt
ed within five years after peace is de
clared to convert it without further
medical examination into ordinary life
20-puy life, endowment maturing at
he age of 02 or other prescribed forms
of insurance.
This insurance will be arranged by
the government, not by private com
panies, and the cost is expected to be
at least one-fourth less than similar
forms offered by private agencies.
Private companies would not write in
surance on many wounded men.
The government will arrange to col
lect premiums monthly, if men wish to
pay this way. or for longer periods in
advance. This may be done through
postoffices.
The minimum amount of insurance
or
to be issued probably will he $1000,
and the maximum $10,000, with any
amount between those sums in mul
tiples of $500.
There will be provi
sion for payment in case of disability
as well as death, according to the
tentative plan. The insurance may be
purchased by any soldier, sailor or
marine officer, enlisted, and by wo
men members of the army or navy
nurse corps; providing they already
hold government voluntary life insur
ance. About 95 per cent of the 4,250,
000 men in the service are covered by
this insurance, which
i
expires after
they go hack to civilian life and pay
ing premiums. This is the old system
devised to replace the pension plan
of providing for ex-soldiers and sail
ors.
Want to Buy a Airplane?
The government proposes to encour
age the production of airplanes,
cording to the report from Washington
Maybe, you sniffed at this item of
r 'ws, thinking it is "more tomfoolery,"
which the government is engaged in.
For you don't believe now that the
airplane will come into
Without venturing a prediction as to
the popularity of the flying transpor
tation system of the future, this
ac
common use.
con
99
ii
HONOR WEEK
Commencing Monday, December 2nd, the six days of this
week have been designated as a time when in honor to Our
Country—Our State—Our Community—and so as not to
be a disappointment to our Brave Boys—we redeem our
pledge and Buy Our Quota of War Savings Stamps.
HONOR
The thing: we fight for—the thing* we prize most—it means
Country—Home—and Loved Ones—It is our measure of
worth while values—Without it we have nothing—Life it
self is not worth having.
OUR COUNTY IS IN HONOR BOUND TO BUY OUR
QUOTA OF W. S. S.
This space Contributed by The Emmett Index.
servative old family guide begs
to call to your recollection of the let
ters you wrote in for publication ten
or twelve years ago in which you ad
vocated measures to keep the few
strange and noisy motor cars then
sputtering about town off the streets.
You wanted to ride down behind "old
Baldy" without the menace of a
"chugging" motor ear to disturb the
established order of migration.. You
remember, of course, how you pointed
the finger of scorn at the dreamers
who predicted that motor cars would
come into common use. Of course,
if your going to write an order for an
airplane today, you wouldn't know
whether to call it a "roadster," a run
about or a limousine. But, for that
matter, ten years ago you didn't know
the difference between a runabout and
a touring car, and you refused to prp
nounce the word limousine in public
for fear of making a spectacle of your
self. Now, just see how glibly you
talk of the different styles. You are
sure, today, that you do not intend to
invest in an airplane, because you say
the motor car "gets you over the
ground as fast as you want to go."
But it seems only yesterday that you
had your first ride in a motor car,
and you held your breath and clenched
your teeth until they needed the atten
tion of a dentist—-you were such a
fraidcat. When some gay young blade
rode by in a motor car at fifteen or
twenty miles an hour, you exclaimed:
"It's a wonder more foole are not kill
ed by these rich ducks riding around
here in those things," That was only
yesterday, and last night the mar
shall threatened to arrest you for ex
ceeding the speed limit. You were sure
then that the train could "get
you over the ground as fast as you
anted to go." hut today you are think
ing of trading in your second or third -
car {dr another one—"one with a
little more 'pep'." If you want to or
der now, you can buy a gay little air
plane runabout, say, for five thou
sand dollars or so, or, if you want one
of the nifty 7-passenger kind, you can
get it, maybe, for something like twen
ty-five thousand dollars. But, if you
have old-fashioned notions about it.
don't buy now. Wait a few
the mail carriers on the rural routes
begin to drop their letters into the
back yard from the air.
v:
years un
W. T. C. U.
The next regular meeting of the W.
T. U. will be held at the home of
Mrs. Wilbur, Tuesday afternoon Dec. 3
Acalled business meeting at the
place was held Tuesday of this
same
week.
Ttnu, all line, at JUUly'i.
j
!
|
|
j
k
Over
One Million
In Use
Fatten i
I Your
Butter-Fat
Profits !
\1
ILLIONS of dollars
are wasted every year by
American fanners—through wasteful cream separa
tion. Swedish farmers don't waste any cream. They
can't afford to. They have to make every penny ol
—^ profit possible. That'
separator is Sweden today
I
G
M
m
y the most popular
is the
s wh
!.l
[i
r CREAM I
separator}
'iM'l
Here is the separator we sell because we can guarantee it to skim}
down to a mere trpee.
Furthermore, because it is made by the most economical and efficient
methods in the la gest cream separator factory in the world, it is sold
at a lower price.
Investigate the Viking. Come into our store and let us demoustrate it
to you. Let us prove that it is the easiest run
ninsr. the closest skimming, the longest lived i
separator made, L
r*
I
Pioneer Furniture Store
P. O. & E. Auto Stage Line
STANTON BROS.. Payette. Idaho.
Phone 210
LEAVE Miles
Payette ..
Ontario ..
Fruitland
New Plymouth....13
Falk ..
Arr. Emmett
Daily and Sunday
Emmett
Falk ....
Miles
LEAVE
1:30 p. m.
2:30 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
p. m.
3:30 p. m.
4:00 p. m.
CAR, CADILLAC SPECIAL
Emmett Phone 16
.8:30 a. m.
6 9:00 a. m.
5 9:20 a. m.
9:50 a. m.
20 10:00 a. m.
33 11:00 a.m.
l::
New Plymouth....20
Fruitland ....
Ontario.
Arr. Payette
28 3:20
32
33
DRIVER. J. W. LEE.
UP-TO-DATE STATIONERY—INDEX OFFICE
The Index Want Column Brings Quick Sale*.

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