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The Emmett index. [volume] (Emmett, Idaho) 1893-1925, December 05, 1918, Image 3

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NEWS OF OUR SOL.
DIER ROYS
(Continued from Page 1)
drove the enemy 14 kilimeters the
first day. 'That night six of us of the
intelligent section were put on an out
post. We were driven out twice by
artillery fire.
The next day just before we went
over the top 1 received a bullet thru
my gas mask. The result was I had to
We drove the Ger
get a new one.
mans two more kilometers, but had
to retreat that night to a position
on a hill. My partner and myself had
to dig in the hill with bayonets. Be
lieve me a bayonet is slow work when
you are in a hurry. We had to move
inuring the night on account of artil
lery fire.
The fourth day was the worst. We
advanced through artillery fire and
Part of us went in
captured a town,
the town at night and upon a hill
where we dug again with bayonets.
We were practically surrounded by
About
Germans, but didn't know it.
4 a. m. a lieutenant came to our res
and by good luck we made our
back to our own lines.
Well, Vera, I haven't time to des
cribe in detail the rest of the fight
will make it short. The other four
days we held the ground we had gain
ed and were under heavy artillery
When relief came
cue
way
fire all the time.
happy bunch of troops. We
then sent to the rear for four
we were a
were
days and then returned for four more
days of fighting. We had narrow es
which I will tell about when I
get home. The battle I took part in
in France is known as the battle of
Argonne Forests.
Every town I have been in for the
last month had been blown to pieces
by artillery fire. I saw a great many
air battles, too. I have been in England
Scotland and saw the coast of Ireland.
The
Halloween passed very quietly here;
about the usual stuff that we have
every day, work in the day time and
sleep at night. But some of the more
venturesome ones couldn't resist a cer
tain building that stands in one cor
of the hospital grounds, and in the
ner
morning it was on its side. But that
was all the damage I saw.
French celebrate the day in a differ
ent manner than we. All Saints Day
big church day with the French,
for practically 99 per cent of them are
Catholics, and the day is considered
a big fete day with them. All the
stores were closed and everybody
seemed to be on the streets, parading
in their Sunday clothes, and visiting.
The-day öfter Halloween is Memor
ial Day with the French and one regi
■ ment of American soldiers formed a
body guard for the French and Ameri
high officials and they marched
is a
can
to the French and American ceme
teries where appropriate services were
held over the graves of the heroes of
this war. I was unable to attend, but
those that were there say it was a
very beautiful and impressive
cere
mony.
We spend pur time in arguAig how
the war will be over, how long we
soon
will be here after the war is over and
what we will do when we do get back
to the States end in civil life again.
We heard yesterday that Austria had
capitulated, so that only leaves Ger
many against us.
ceived no papers for three days so
have no way of knowing whether it is
But we have re
true or not.
And of course we had to have bad
to counteract the good, so there
news
is a report
has come into the field again, this
time on the side of the Hun and has 2
million troops in the field. Of course
it is probably not true, and won't
make much difference if true, but it
shows what fine rumors we get every
day in the army.
Harry Foster leaves tonight with
another boy of this organization with
of medical troops for the
a convoy
front. They will deliver the troops to
officer there and then return to
some
this station. Harry expects to get a
chance to see his brother on his way
back, and it is probable that they will
also spend a day in Paris before re
home. John Gamage will
turning
leave tomorrow night for the coast
with a bunch of patients for a base
hospital, the same trip that I took
some time this summer.
From Harry Foster.
Oct. 30—There is nothing to the re
port about Paul that you received be
I received a letter from him
Tritten October 19 and he was still in
the thick of it and getting along fine.
I would give anything to have been
I do not think
cause
IV
through what he has.
that there is another fellow from Em
mett that has been at the front at
He went into the
long as he has.
trenches February 23 and has been
there ever since, having gone through
oQ
Get the Genuine,
and Avoid
@2
m
»•^economy
In tvery Caka
some of the hardest battles that have
been fought. His regiment has been
cited more times than any regiment
in France and his division, the 42nd,
is the only division that has received
four citations, which entitles them to
wear the sord with a bronze star, al- j
though he has received no promotions,
he is certainly entitled to more honor
than these fellows that have fought
the war in the S. O. S. (myself fori
instance), (retting their favors be- j
cause someone thinks they are the
whole A. E. F. Believe me, I would I
rather be in Paul's place.
Nov. 14— Dearest Mother:—Well,:
mother dear, it looks as though the
big fuss is over as far as hostilities
are concerned, though I suppose it 1
will be sometime before everything is
settled. I have been to the front with
troops and returned through Paris,,
having spent five days in the famous
town. I happened to be there the
night that the Kaiser abdicated: also |
the day that the armistice was signed :
and talk about a wild time, I thought
the people, especially the French !
would all go crazy. They lighted up i
solid mass of people. It seems as tho
the French lay the results upon the
the town and the boulevards were a
Americans and there is nothing too I
good that they can do for us.
I haven't heard from Paul since
Oct. 19. He was fine then and still
at it. He has been through the Ar
gon,re woods battle and helped capture]
Sedan. I tried to find him while I -
was up that way, but could not locate
him. I expect him now at any time.
John Gamage was up to Tours and |
had r fine visit with Clifford Annan. |
The Dumb Heroes of Sedan
For nearly half a century Sedan ;
had stood for military humiliation to
the uttermost degree, for it was Sep
tember 1, 1870, in the Franco-Prus-1
sian War, that the French under Mar
shall MacMahon were defeated by the
Prussian Army, with 17,000 casualties j
and the loss of 82,000 prisoners, in-1
eluding Emperor Napoleon III, by j
capituaiation. France could forget all |
it could sooner forget the tear
ing of Alsac-Lorraine from the moth
erland—but Sedan was seared into the
soul of the nation.
elsi
So if any one spectacular feat were ;
necessary to endear America to the I
French people, it was that the Yankee i
Array should take Sedan from the:
German forces a few hours before the ;
armistice ending the world war was j
signed November 11, 1918. America)
obliterated the stain upon French i
arms, and for that fact France per-1
haps is grateful as it will be for the j
return of the "Lost Sister" after the I
peace congress has been written into j
history.
But there is another memory of Se- j
dan, less harrowing if equally pathetic !
It is the story of the "Riderless !
Steeds," which an anonymous poet :
told in verse after the war of 1870-71 ]
had ended. A prefatory note explain
ed:
"A newspaper correspondent relates
that on the morning after the terrible
Battle of Sedan six hundred cavalry
horses, without riders, galloped up at
the sound of the bugles and took their
places in the French ranks."
The story was referred to in Harper's ]
Weekly for December 24, 1870, which j
said of the horse's remarkable per-1
formance:
"They were jaded, and in many I
cases maimed-; but they had wandered
about in affright till they heard the j
familiar sound, which their discipline
made them obey."
Harper's Weekly quoted Lieutenant
Colonel Pemberton:
"Only those who have seen a battle
field can form a notion of the extra
ordinary way in which the horses, as
irilffellow 6 *
will follow a regiment to which they
belong. I saw what evidently had
been sergeant's horses keeping their
position in the rear of their squadron
wheeling with it and halting exactly
and all the time streaming with blood,
as if their riders were on their backs.
Poor creatures, they are indeed to be
pitied, for they have neither country,
promotion nor coveted medal to think
of, whatever may be the issue; and
few indeed there are that have not
;
j
some honorable scars to show.'
Diamond Edge knives and razors
at Reilly's.
'

C. D. BUCKNUM
Funeral Director
and
Licensed Embalmer
Finest Equipped Funeral
Chapel in the state.
Calls to city or country
responded to promptly.
.
Agency for
MONUMENTS
of all kinds.
Day and night phone 4-J
v
Ni
»ft
A?
• *
EËÊËE55»
vr
m
i
N=
» — .
What About Christmas?
It's less than three weeks away and many of us haven't made a start at buying- yet. Why
not do it now while stocks are complete, and avoid the rush and jam of late shopping?
What to give Friends, Father, Mother, the Boys and Girls is a problem easily solved at this
store.
These suggestions may help.
I
A personal inspection is needed to get a conception of
all we are showing to meet the ladies' Christmas fancy.
LACE COLLARS, HANDKERCHIEFS.
BOOKS, BOX STATIONERY.
TOILET SETS, ACCESSORIES.
BROOCHES, PINS, FANCY COMBS.
KID, SILK and WOOL GLOVES.
HOSIERY—In silk, lisle and wool.
MATCHED TABLE LINEN SETS.
SILK UNDERSKIRTS, FANCY PETTICOATS.
BATH ROBES, ROBE MATERIAL.
KIMONAS, NIGHT GOWNS.
GEORGETTE and CREPE DE CHINE W AISTS.
BOUDOIR CAPS, SILK CAMISOLES.
SILKS, WOOL DRESS GOODS.
That's just where we shine. Men's wear of all descrip
tions can be found here in great variety. Priced right,
too.
HANDKERCHIEFS—In linen, silk or initial.
HOSIERY—In cotton, lisle, silk or wool.
NECKTIES that will please the most particular.
SHIRTS—In Madras, wool or silk.
GLOVES—To work in or wear to church.
UNDERWEAR of all descriptions.
PAJAMAS and NIGHTGOWNS.
SUIT CASES and TRAVELING BAGS.
RAZOR SETS and POCKET KNIVES.
SCARF PINS and CUFF BUTTONS.
SWEATERS You can see a mile away, or the kind
made for work and warmth.
Gifts for Boys
Gifts for Girls
THE BABIES
NECKTIES, FANCY HOSE.
SWEATERS. GLOVES.
HANDKERCHIEFS, MUFFLERS.
-MACKINAWS, OVERCOATS.
HATS, CAPS.
SLIPPERS, SHOES.
TIE PINS. CUFF BUTTONS.
ROCKING HORSES, TOOL BOXES.
CANDY, NUTS.
HAIR RIBBONS, WINDSOR TIES.
BOOKS, FANCY STATIONERY.
DOLLS, TOY FURNITURE.
GAMES, TOILET SETS.
GLOVES, MITTENS.
JEWELRY, NECKLACES.
HANDKERCHIEFS. HOSIERY.
SWEATERS, SKATING SETS.
TAM O' SHANTER CAPS.
FELT SLIPPERS, SHOES.
We have
a host
of things
suitable
for them.
V
Useful Gifts for the Home
Bed Spreads, Blankets, Towels, Table Linens and Rugs make useful and acceptable gifts
Remember that we are closing out our Rug Stock at greatly reduced prices.
The Golden Rule Store
PEOPLE
Colonel Roosevelt Outlines His Uni
versai Training Plan
To clear up misunderstandings pur
. ...... , v
posely cultivated in the Middle West
by opponents of Colonel Roosevelt con
C erning his attitude toward universal
AN ARMY OF THE
military service, Mr. Roosevelt recent
ly stated his views as follows:
"Believe in a small standing army
ahd in the principle of universal train
ing for all our young men. Let the
, . X„ , .
ages of 19 and 23, have nine months
with the colors. Pick out every- candi
date for noncommissioned officers or
for officers from those who desire
such nositions and whose services dur
such positions and whose services dur
mg the nine months showed them to
be most fitted for such positions.
"Under that system we would have
almvst no standing army, certainly a
. ' ' , ■
standing army no larger than ours
[was at the outbreak of the war. Wei
.....
wou d have all our young men receive
a- training which would take the
physical and moral stoop out of their
shoulders, would make them infinitely
better citizens in time of peace as re
gards the state, and would so improve
them physically and mentally that
they would be more useful to them
selves and their families and more val
uable assets in the country. We could
have a great reserve army which
woud not be particularly efficient for
-- ». , , . _ ,
offense but would be very powerful
for defense. It would be composed of
men voters, your sons, and my sons
and our neighbors' sons, who would
not make a separate militarist class
. . . \ „ , *
but would simply and actually be the
people themselves. It would not offer :
the slightest temptation for aggres- j
sion and it would effectively guaran
tee us as not even the wisest peace
Iea -' ue «»«*" guarantee us against
.(all likelihood of foreign war and would
jt abso , ute , y certain that no j
nation ; n its rig , ht senses would ever
attack us and anv nation that did at
tack us could not by any possibility
j
i conuuer us."
Greatly Benefited by Chamberlain's
Tablets.
.. , . .. ...
I am thankful for the good I have
received from chamberlain's Tablets,
About two years ago when I began .
taking them I was suffering a great
deal from distress after eating, and
from ht?ada rhe and a tir «l languid
fee , jnfr due to indi)jestion ^ a torpid
jj ver Chamberlain's Tablets correct -
ed these disorders in a short time, and
since taking two bottles of them my
health has been good, writes Mrs. M.
P. Harwood. Auburn, N. V
Washing Poor People's Feet.
The custom of washing the fPet of
[».«or on Mann-ly Thursday at
Whitehall
sovereigns until the end of the aev
pnteenth century. After that the oere
tnonv was performed on their behalf by
the ArcJibishops of York until the mid
of the eighteenth century.
was observed by English
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy,
Do not imagine that because other
rough medicines failed to give you re
lief that it will be the same with
chamber lain's Cough Remedy. Bear !
mind that from a small beginning
this remedy has gained a world wide j
reputation and immense sale. A med-j
idne m " St ^exceptional merit to
win esteem wherever it becomes
known.
PROPER FOOD
Produces endurance and endurance pro
duces Success. Success depends greatly
on human health. Wholesome food not
only establishes Health, but it maintains
Vitality essential to daily work.
Our Groceries
Are selected according- to the above.
They are wholesome, kept cleanly and
represent standard manufacturers.
Choice Teas and Coffees Here
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
CASH GROCERY
Phone 189-J.
W. C. LANGROISE. Propr.
Where They Have Things

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