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The Emmett index. [volume] (Emmett, Idaho) 1893-1925, January 16, 1919, Image 3

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NEWS OF OUR SOL.
DIER BOYS
(Continued from Page 1)
but you ought to see me. My last
shave, bath and change of clothing
was at Camp Upton, and that was
two weeks ago and I've been living
in mud for a week! If I shave or wash
now I'll catch cold sure, as I'd lose so
much covering. I understand we are
going to move into more permanent
quarters soon, where we will have
shower baths and barracks. My! what
a luxury that will be, I may be sent
back on a hospital ship to help take
of the wounded—I don't know
rare
what I am going to do.
Dec. 6.—We left New York City on
Friday, November 15 in the evening.
Sailed on the S. S. France, the largest
and fastest of the French liners. Ar
rived in the harbor of Brest, France,
As the
on Friday morning, Nov. 22.
ship was too big to come up to the
docks we were transferred to a small
steamer and taken to shore. We
marched through the narrow, dirty
streets of the city out into the
coun
at the old
try to the rest camp
French Vontenegen barracks.
We left this camp on Sunday, Dee. 1,
cold drizzly morning, and marched
with our packs to the railroad station
Here we took the train. I
a
at Brest.
rode with six other non-coms in a
third class compartment of a third
class, four-wheeled coach, or buggy.
One entered from the side, all the
There were no cush
same as a hack.
the seats, just plain wooden
ions on
benches, no heat, no aisleways and
no wash rooms. We rode and slept
in this compartment for two days and
two 1 nights,
coast line south.
went the prettier the country got,
the better the towns and cities were,
and the neater and cleaner the people
Nantes on the river Loire
The road followed the
The farther south
«V
seemed.
Here we saw
especially pretty,
the sun for the firs\ time in France.
It sure cheered us up. We arrived at
Bordeaux early in the morning, then
started east, finally .arrived at Perig
at noon on
Here we detrained
our
neux, our destination,
Tuesday, Dec. 3.
and marched through town to
quarters.
There is a dandy Red Cross build
ing here where one ran go to write
or play games or visit around the
One night they had a dandy
stoves.
band concert and another night a mo
There is no "Y" or K. C.
vie show.
hall and no canteen. Tobacco is about
the only article here one can buy.
There is no candy. There are French
peddlers who sell grapes, apples, figs,
nuts, etc., but the prices are so high
cannot afford to buy very often.
one
Chewing gum is not to be had nor
have I seen any since leaving the
States.
From Fletcher Mingus.
Nov. 10—I have not much to write
Corner Grocery
THE HOME OF GOOD EATS
The place to buy Groceries for the least asoæy.
Everything fresh and clean and nothing but the
best carried in stock.
Fresh Green Vegetables of all kinds. Oranges,
Lemons, Bananas, Gfbpe Fruit and Cranberries.
Also Fresh Weinies, Bologna, Minced Ham, Pig's
Feet and Cured Meats of all kinds.
SAVE MONEY j*nd buy Nut Margarin« and
Oleomargin«.
SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH
SEE WHAT CASH WILL BUY
W. W. Wilkerson, Prop.
Auto Delivery
Phone 160.
There was
• a Crowd in
the Store
a]
and they were trying to josh the Tobacco Man
Have a chew on so long it costs noth
me,"sayshe."Break ing extra to chew
off just two or three this class of tobac
squares.
man's size
Real Gravely. It
holds its good taste
»
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:
That's a
chew of

co.
It goes further — that's
why you can get the good
taste of this clou of tobac
co without extra cost.
PEYTON BRAND .
Real Gravely Chewing Plug
e 2 ch piece packed in a pouch
EE
about this time, so will give you a de
scription of what' is going on over
here; that is, as much as I am al
lowed to tell. The traffic is some
thing immense and our trucks are sure
doing great work and there are scads
of them, too. In one place where we
waited by the road all day our trucks
went by in a steady stream on both
sides of the road about twenty feet
apart. On the main roat^s it re
minds one of the main streets in the
cities, traffic is so congested. The
French have a great number of trucks
also, but they are getting old and
worn out and do not compare with
ours in strength and size. Some
times when a division is moved by
trucks the trucks are lined up in a
solid column for five or six miles and
sometimes more. Our tractors sure
do great work also in moving heavy
artillery. They are very large and
of the caterpillar type and have some
power.
Talking about motor trucks, acci
dents will happen sometimes. I saw
a soldier getting off of one that was
pulling a big gun which had wheels
about a foot wide, His foot slipped
and he fell and the wheel of the big
gun ran right over his head,
that is one accident in many. Most
all our movements are made at night
without lights and we get some merry
rides sometimes. Thirty of us get
into a truck with our packs and in
struments, which makes a tight
But
squeeze.
I saw a boche aeroplane over our
lines the other day taking observa
tions. Our anti-aircraft guns were
shooting at him, but he was not very
scared, as they only bring one down in
about 5000 shots. Suddenly five of our
planes dropped down out of the clouds
top of him and I soon heard his
engine quit on him and two of our
planes followed him clear
ground to make sure he wasn't fool
I also saw another one Jrought
on
the
t"
mg.
down the same day. The Hun also got
one of our observation balloons tjjiat
afternoon about a mile from here, and
I saw the two observers come down
from the balloon in their parachutes.
The balloon burned up in about a min
The balloons are filled with an
ute.
explosive gas and they are set on fire
with a special kind of bullet and burn
very rapidly.
In the place we are now we have
the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A and Salva
tion Army, from which we can pur
chase a limited amount of chocolates
and cookies and a few other articles.
But I believe the
does the mo'st good for the funds
receives.
Nov. 11.—The war ended yesterday
at 11 o'clock. Had a big time and
the band played on the street.
Nov. 30— I thought of you all on
Thanksgiving day and knew you
thinking of me. I spent a very pleas
ant day and had a nice dinner. In the
afternoon we (the band) played for
football game and gave a concert
the evening. I played while a fellow
were
in
OVERCOATS AND MACKINAWS
FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN
You need them now during this cold wea
ther. They are good Flu protectors. Come
in while the assortment is complete. They
are well made, nicely tailored and of excel
lent materials. We want to close them out
and they are priced right to move them.
MADAM PFEIL CORSETS
For style, comfort and durability the Mad
am Pfeil Corsets have gained a wide reputa
tion. A range of materials, models and prices
for every figure and pocketbook.
SKATING SETS.
Theâe are great days for skating. Great
sport and healthy exercise. To be comfort
able and warm you should have a skating
set, consisting of scarfs and toques, for both
boys and girls.
y
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f-jy rr 5 s
£1
Vs
US if«?.
SIMS
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Overshoes —Protect the feet as well as the
body from cold and wet. We have a big line
for men and women, boys and girls.
Woolen Socks —Warm as toast. Carried in
all weights and sizes.

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as ft
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When You Want Good Shoes
Go to
John MclNish's Store
General Merchandise and Groceries
it
is gone on a furlough, which seems
pretty good.
We landed in London, when we
came across and went to Southampton,
where we crossed the English channel
to Le Harve, France. After spending
a day in the rest camp there we went
to Bourges, near the center of France,
where we were billeted three weeks,
From there we were sent to the 28th
division of Pnnsylvania and joined
them just as they were going into the
Argonne Forest, in which engagement
they played a big part. It was a dif
ficult place to take, as the French and
Germans had been in the same place
for four years and had dug themselves
in vary securely. Our men sent one of
the worst barrages over during the
It started about 10 o'clock and
a
war.
lasted until daylight in the morning,
and was one big roar, like the ocean,
only much louder. The Germans had
concrete dugouts that were fixed up
like palaces, with pianos and every
thing in them,
to a place called Pannes, just in front
of Metz, where we were until the ar
mistice was signed, which, if they had
not signed, we would have taken in a
short time, because we had ar
From there we went
very
tillery hub deep and large ones too.
From there we moved to a place near
here* in some German billets, which
they had fixed up nice, for two weeks.
Buxieres, Dec. 16—Our division has
been picked to reinforce the occupa
tion troops going into Germany, so
do not know when we will be sent
The division has also been giv
home.
en the name of the "Iron Division" by
General Pershing for their good work
We are also one of
during the war.
the . ed fighting divisions and wear the
red keystone on our left shoulders.
view from a
We have a very nice
high hill close by here. We can
all over because the rest of the land
is low. Fifteen town are in sight, but
the towns are close together, some
times not more than a mile apart, and
are not very large. The view reminds
of Frcezeout hill, only much larg
Anothcr fellow and I are going
Mount Sec this afternoon and
the trenches and dugouts. They
the Germans had tunnels clear
see
one
er.
over to
see
say
through the mountain.
The orchestra is going to Nancy
a show. They
tonight to play for
went to Toul last night and may go to
Pans. One of our battalions has been
pick»c' to parade before President Wil
son in Paris.
CASH IN ADVANCE.
One of the mistaken business prac
tices which newspapers have followed
in the past and which the exigencies
of war conditions relegated to the dis
card was the habit of continuing sub
scriptions on and on after their orig
inal term had expired. Especially was
this true of weekly newspapers pub
lished and circulated in communities
comparatively small and limited.
The publishers were always between
two fires. They could not demand
cash in advance because a large pro- j
portion of their subscribers were per- |
i sonal friends and many of these would
j have resented such a course as a re
flection upon their own credit and good
intentions. In order to avoid suspend- (
i n g these friends the publisher was
ordinarily compelled to adopt the
rather shiftless policy of allowing the
name to stand until something hap-1
pened to get it paid up or stopped. |
Under orders of the war industries |
board last fall this practice was sum- j
marily stopped. The country weekly j
newspaper was told that, regardless I
of whom it might offend, it must dis
continue subscriptions which were in
arrears.
The paying in advance method is
much preferable from the standpoint
of the subscriber as well as of the
publisher. He buys a subscription for 1
a certain length of time and if not
renewed at expiration it ceases at that
date. No further obligation is in
curred. Under the old plan the paper
would continue to come to him for a
year, two years or many years and I
eventually he would have to pay the j
accumulated bill or be marked down !
bad egg on the books of the pub-1
lisher. Under the new scheme he re- i
news if he wants to and does not re- ,
new if he doesn't want to.
as a
Now that the war is over and war j
restrictions have been removed, The j
Index will not return to the old credit
We are convinced that no
system.
body ever eared much for a newspaper ,
anything else, he got for nothing, '
matter how good it might be.
Credit will be gladly extended to |
those deserving of it, but it must be j
arranged for. This paper will not j
be forced on anyone who does not care
for it enough to pay for it.
Watch the label on your paper; it •
tells when your subscription expires. 1
If you don't want to miss an issue
renew promptly, either by paying
cash or arranging for a short credit.
m ■
Cured at a Cost of 25 Cents.
"Eight years ago when we first
moved to Mattoon, I was a great suf- |
ferer from indigestion and constipa- j
tion," writes Mrs. Robert Allison, Mat- 1
toon, 111. "I had frequent headaches \
and dizzy spells and there was a feel- |
ing like a heavy weight pressing on
my stomach and chest all the time. I
felt miserable. Every morsel of food _
distressed me. I could not rest at
Tablets cured me and 1 have since
felt like a different person."
A healthy man is a king in his own
right; an unhealthy man an unhappy
slave. For impure blood and slug
gish liver, use Burdock Blood Bitters.
On the market 35 years. $125 a
bottle.
Dairymen, Attention!
Have you tried shipping cream to the Coast
markets ?
We pay highest market prices and remit
promptly for each shipment
Price today 73c per lb. No. 1 Butterfat
f. o. b. Portland, Oregon
No deductions except for express.
Correct weights and tests guaranteed.
Write us for tags and cans.
We also buy poultry and eggs.
UNION MEAT COMPANY
PORTLAND, OREGON
»
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■f
i
sV
AVi
PALACE MEAT MARKET
CHAS. CLICK, Proprietor
FRESH AND CURED MEATS
Sausage, Lard, Chickens
Fresh Fish Every Thursday and Friday
Highest Market Price Paid for Hides and Pelts.
Auio Delivery
BUTTER WRAPPERS AT INDEX OFFICE.
Phone 160.
UP-TO-DATE STATIONERY—INDEX OFFICE
SALE BELLS AT THE RIGHT PRICE—INDEX

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