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The Emmett index. [volume] (Emmett, Idaho) 1893-1925, April 24, 1919, Image 2

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THE EMMETT INDEX
Published every Thursday by
ED SKINNER
Entered in the Emmett postoffice
as second class mail matter.
Subscription Bates
$ 2.00
One year_
Six months „
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Ml
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Look at the printed label on your
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the subscription expires. Forward
your money in ample time for renewal.
Notice date on label carefully, and if
not correct, please notify us at once.
Subscribers desiring the address of
their paper changed please state in
their communication both the OLD
and NEW address.
CURRENT COMMENT.
JN connection with the good roads
proposition, The Index suggest* that
road* through irrigated «ection« t>e
lined with tree*. What a sight ami
what a comfort it would he if the
highway* were lined on each aide with
maples or cork elms! And u* an ad
vertisement for the country it can't
he heat. Of course it would tie im
|>osaihle to plant ail these trees in
on* year, hut the planting of a few
each year would in lime accomplish
wonders. If nut trees were planted
the revenue from them would in time
amount to many thousands of dollars
annually. The only objection to nut
tree« is that they are alow growers.
we get it from the telegraph, the
Teutons, who were convicted some
months ago, are to lie sentenced to
morrow, April 26. It was a disastrous
frolic for the Teut*. They lost Al
sace-lxiruinr, all of their colonies,
their navy, their merchant marine,
their foreign trade, their emperor, 3
or four million men and the respect
snd esteem of the civilized world. And
they still have the fiddler to pay.
r pHE national administration will at
once issue an order for the elec
t roe'll ion of Senator Jim Reed of Mis
souri. Senator Jim said in a speech
the other day that the United Stales
would feel a whole lot safer if Elihu
Root, Henry Cabot Ixidge and Philan
der C. Knox were sitting at the peace
table In Pans instead of the bunch
that is there.
'J'HKRE is tittle occasion for you to
worry. In due time things will he
patched up and some sort of peace
concluded. It will not he entirely
satisfactory to any of the countries
intimately concerned In it, but the
probabilities that it will affect your
pursuit of life, liberty and happiness
are exceedingly remote.
J> EDUCTION of taxation will he
"the cornerstone of the platform
which the Republican congress will
build during the extra session ami next
winter's regular sessioi
Washington. Taxation
now comes to a round 4 billions a year.
, ... 1
war it required a billion to
,, ^
- .. 1
of the appropriation t commit
giung over department re
, _
iiulteim id- and will make in effort to I
..
cu ( appropriations 2f> per cent ne.i
, .. ,, ,
year, or 1 billion dollars. But there
, .
great depreciation in the
, . ,
aniounl of revenue derived from li
quors. because of prohibition, and on
top of that the cost of enforcing the
prohibitory law will, it is estimated,
amount to 200 million dollars. It is
So says a
report fioi
federal government.
tun lh<
I lean
tec» «t«
ill h
evidently a big problem that the new
congress face». We have come to the
place where congress must heed the
recommendation of Roosevelt, Taft
and Wilson, three presidents who have
laid liefore it a budget system.
wOMEONE has taken the trouble to
send u* an alleged scientific mag
azine published in 8t. Louis, supposed
to I« devoted to research of spiritual
phenomena. In reality it is devoted to
the promulgation of Spiritualism. It
is filled with interview* or lectures or
whatever you may call them, said to
have been delivered by prominent per
son* who used to be on earth. Bob
Ingersoll takes up quite a good deal
of space giving hi» views concerning
the world here and the spirit world.
We must say we are disappointed in
Bob. If he is really talking from the
other side, he is retrograding. When
he was on earth he was generally rec
ognised as the most brilliant word
painter of his time. Thousands of
persons who disagreed entirely with
his theological opinions were charmed
by his marvelous wit and eloquence.
But these spiritual talks of Bob's
strike u* as inane, stupid. One of oor
fond hopes has been that in a future
existence we shall experience a
tal improvement, and not do or say
the bonehead things we realise we
have been guilty of doing and saying
at various times on earth. But if in
the spirit world we are to have less
sense than we have here, and if we
are doomed to associate with a lot of
chumps who have aloe deteriorated
mentally, through the endless ages of
eternity, great scott! that win be
fierce. But, then, maybe the ort ho
ir that the reason
Bob Ingersoll has deteriorated is be
men
do* person will
cause that is part of his punishment.
In other words that is the hell of it.
S AM YTHE, old time newspaper
correspondent and one of the prin
cipal contributors of the Saturday Ev
ening Post, has spent a good deal of
the time since the war began in Eu
rope, and has picked up some mighty
interesting stories of experiences
among the soldiers. Here is one; A
young man, a favorite of fortune, the
son of a multimillionaire and husband
of a young wife whose family have
more money than they really know
how to spend, desided in a burst of
patriotism that he would enlist as a
private. Incidentally it may be men
tion«^ that the draft caught a good
many pets of fortune, but this partic
ular one enlisted. He put on a pri
vate's uniform, went into camp and
took his training along with the rest
of the privates. Instead of having
somebody wait on him at his command
he waited on himself and took com
mands from ail sorts and grades of
officers. He went to France and did
his duty as u soldier without complaint
marched in the rain and the mud, car
ried stretchers loaded with his wound
ed comrades for 72 hours at a stretch
without rest or steep; In short, he
saw all the dangers and hardships that
had to be endured by the ordinary
buck private. He came through with
out getting hurt and with unimpaired
health. Rut his experiences gave him
a new viewpoint. As he expressed it
to Sam Blythe, he had seen life from
the underside and it had changed a lot
of his opinions. He was coming home
with radical opinions about a number
of things and determined to see if he
could help the under dog. He related
an instance where he had been acting
as stretcher bearer until he had just
about reached the limit of his physical
endurance. At lust he was permitted
to go back for a rest. Stumbling along
through the rain and mud, so weary
that it was nearly impossible to drug
one foot after another, he came to
mess tent where there was good bacon
frying and the smell of fragrant cof
fee and new baked bread. He stopped
and begged for something to eat, but
was told that this food was for offi
cers only; that he must go back seven
kilometers to find a place where pri
vates could eat. And so he had to
drag through that weary four or five
miles further before he could get rest
and refreshment. He said it gave
him an idea of the sort of feeling the
hungry man without money must have
had when he tramped by the windows
of the house of his family at home.
There was abundance, for more than
the inmates of the house needed or
could use, while the one on the out
side was cold and weary and desper
ately hungry. "Is it any wonder," he
said to Blythe, "that we >rich are hat
ed by the poor?" We do not know
how many other rich young men hud
similar experienc
them they, too, will come buck to this
country with a new viewpoint.
Among all the privates he talked with
of all sorts and conditions, says Blythe
, . , .
there seemed to he a practical unamm
... . ,
it y on one point, ami that was a deep-
seated hatred of the military system,
, .......
A few have imagined that when the
, . .. ... ,
bovs get home they will be in favor
' ■
of universal compulsory militai y tram
. . .... ,
ling. As a matter of fact, any political
* , ,
party that stands for such a policy
, , ,, . ,
will get a solar plexus blow at elec
, but if they had{
lion from the hoys who come hack
from over there, that will put that
if business.
These lads
party out
have found from experience that the
military system is tyranny; that is is
undemocratic; that it makes snobs
and martinets out of men; that ineom
competent men are placed in positions
where they can bullyrag and punish
their betters. Mark it well, no univor
ililary training system will he
established in this country
consent of the hoys who fought in
France.
sal
ith the
TALES OF TOWN )
I- >
LET'S FORGET IT.
Say! Let's forget it! l-et's put it
aside!
I.ife is so short and the world is so
wide;
Days are so short and there's so much
to do;
W'hat if it was false—there's so much
that's true.
Say! Let's forget! Let's brush it
away
Now and
say ?
All of the bitter words said shall be
praise.
forever! So, what do you
One of these days.
Say! Let's forget it! Let's wipe off
the slate;
Find something better to cherish than
hate;
There's so much gi
that we've had;
Let's strike a balance and cross off
the bad.
Ssy! Let's forgive it whatever it be;
Let's not be slaves when we might be
free.
We shall be walking in sunshiny ways
One of these days.
Say! Let's not take it so sorely to
heart!
Hate* may tic friendships just drifted
apart.
Failure may be genius not quite under
stood;
We could all help folks so much if
in the world
we would.
Let's get closer to somebody's
Say!
side,
See what his dream is and know how
he tried,
Learn if our scoldings won't give way
to praise
One of these days.
f u |
Say! Let's not wither! Let's branch
out and rise
Out of the byways and nearer the
skies;
Let's spread some shade that's re
freshing and deep,
Where some tired traveler may lie
down and sleep.
Say! Let's not tarry! Let's do it
right now;
So much to do if we find out how;
We may not be here to help folks, or
praise
One of these days.
Curious, isn't it, that the Loan
should start just after it's Lent.
• • <•
It "the good die young" lots of old '
folks in the world are in a mighty
embarrassing position.
* * «
Another thing husband can't under
stand is how wife can tell anything
on earth about a pattern.
« * *
The difference between a fighter and
a knocker is the difference between
the affection of a dog and a mule.
« « •
The crucial days for the peach, the
prune and the other fruit crops is here,
and the peace conference hasn't any
monopoly on crises.
« « «
It is said goldfish eat mosquitoes.
If this be true, we know where a gold
fish of good .character can find a
steady job this summer.
« • «
People who find so much fault with
this good old world had better be care
There is only one other place to
go and there are no return tickets.
« * *
The time is coming, and it is not
far distant, when a man who indulges
his taste for tobacco will draw a jail
|
|
sentence in connection with his fine.
* * *
Far be it from us to suggest any
thing, hut we read in an eastern paper
the other day that a woman found a
dollar while spading up the garden.
• t «
The burning issue is not what vari
ety of a league of nations to adopt,
but whether father should take an af
ternoon off to make garden or go
fishing.
• • •
Ho walked into the jewelry store
with a bashful air, and murmured: "I
—ah— er — um." "Bring that tray of
engagement rings here," Joe called to
his clerk.
* • •
All that the German peace dele
gates need to take along when they
start for Paris tomorrow is a foun
tain pen apiece and the price of a
night's lodging.
♦ ♦ *
Well, there is this nice thing about
national prohibition: After July 1 a
man can go away from home ami re
turn with a suit case without being
under suspicion.
♦ » ♦
A little fellow said the other even
ing to his mamma: "Isn't it funny
how the days go 'by, one after the
other, just like a train of cars, with
Sunday for the engine?"
♦ » *
We would like to know how a boy
who has to pay a luxury tax of 10
per cent on baseball hats and masks
and mitts can over be expected to
grow up into a man and a soldier?
» ♦ ♦
Little Billie was looking at Elijah
going to heaven in a chariot of fire.
Pointing to the halo about the proph
et's head, Billie exclaimed: "See,
mamma, he's carrying an extra tire."
m m •
"How many of you boys," asked a
Sunday school superintendent, "will
bring another boy next Sunday?"
Nobody answered for a few minutes,
when Willie's hand went up. "I know
two hoys. One of them I can lick and
I will try my derndest to bring him,"
"Have you got any of this yur
White Lightning Liniment?" asked a
man in the drug store the other day.
"My wife's rheumatism is pestering
her powerful,
horse liniment," said the clerk.
"Well, gimme a bottle of it. Nuthin'a
too good for my wife, by cracky!"
• • •
A Luisville A Nashville box
went through here the other day with
the letters L. 4k N. covering nearly
the whole side of the car. A stranger
asked what the letters stood for, gnd
a small boy standing near said: "That
car is to haul President Wilson's
League of Nations in—that's what
them letters stand for."
• mm
A fsrmer and wife recently lost
their last hog. They agreed not to
say anything and they would know
the first person mentioning the fact
would be the thief. Sunday they en
tered the church and the preacher
read- out his text: "I have meat to
eat that ye know not of." Nudging
his wife, the old farmer whispered,
"Maria, we never did suspect him,
did we?'
" "But that is
• • •
A boy who stuttered badly
standing in the Grand Central station
one day in New York. A stranger
came up and asked him how to get
— !
Ü1
ss
SS
SS
==
Ready to Wear
MILLINERY
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DRY GOODS
NOTIONS
CORSETS
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WHITE FOOTWEAR
Choose now, from a wide range for selection. We =
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Ladies' white high lace shoe, Sea Island fabric, 555
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Ladies' extra quality, high lace white
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29c 35c 43c 98c
= SPECIAL VALUES IN WHITE HOSIERY
$4.19
Ladies' fine white mercerized lisle hose,
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pair
33c
Misses' and growing girls' patent leather vamp
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. 2.69
Ladies' out-size mercerized lisle hose,
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5 Vi to 8
8'4 to 11 ...
11H to 2.
2Vi to 7.
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high ribbed top, the pair
Ladies' white artificial
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Just a limited quantity to offer.
3.19
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3.85
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We are equipped with a well selected stock of the
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Ready-to-Wear Department
CHINA
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Don't fail to visit the balcony when in need of
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Kentucky Double Disk and
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Most simple feed known. There is no complicated
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There are no printed quantity directions to follow.
Metal indicator plate attached to the hopper designates
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There are no reducers necessary to sow alfalfa or
millet; simply close with the feed lever.
There is no shifting of cog wheels or bevel pinion
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The bevel deflector in the feed cup causes an even
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the next begins, and there is an absence of wavy sowing.
Simplicity, durability and efficiency are paramount
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We Are Exclusive Agents for All
McCormick Tillage Implements
Hawkins Hardware Store
to Central park. The boy told him
best he could, and then turned to
a man standing by and said: "G-g-gee,
that's t-t-tough luck. There's f-f-four
m-m-million s-s-seven hundred and
eighty-three p-p-people living in N
N-New York and yet h-h-he h-had to
p-p-pick me out."
as
• • •
Two travelers began talking—and
became friendly.
"Have a cigar?" began one.
"Don't think I'll take one, thank
you!" said the other.
"Have a cigarette, then?"
"No, thank you!"
"How about a chew?" the first per
sisted in desperation.
"Don't use tobacco at a
». thank
you!"
"Well," the first man ejaculated in
consternation, "what in the name ' of
guineapiga do ye do with yer mouth " I
4 s WHERE '£•
r ^ C0ES #
it
I saw it in The Index.
99
j j., » - * „„ not subscribe
and read it yourself. All the news. $2.00 per year
UP-TO-DATE STATIONERY—INDEX OFFICE

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