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The Emmett index. [volume] (Emmett, Idaho) 1893-1925, October 20, 1921, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091145/1921-10-20/ed-1/seq-7/

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Champion Ewe at Live Stock Exposition
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The Paéific International Live Stock Exposition which will be held at
North Portland this year, November 5-12, will probably contain the largest
sheep show in its history. Manager O. M. Plummer believes that there may
be 1000 head. In view of the fact that all the fairs and shows In the
Northwest this year are showing greatly increased sheep exhibits, his prophecy
is apt to come-true. .
The animal shown above is "Oregon iAasie," the champion yearling ewe
in the Cheviot breeds, owned by R. A. Templeton of Halsey, Oregon.
Western Oregon has long been famous for its middle wool sheep, and
already this year notable winnings have been made by exhibits from this
section at fairs and expositions throughout Canada and the eastern part of
the United States. , -, . . , ......
Perhaps it was not altogether a fable about Jason adventuring his life In
search of the golden fleece. While the wool growers of the Northwest have
had a hard time since the war, the ultimate future of wool and mutton prp
duction is certain to be financially profitable. The day will come when no
farm will be considered fully stocked without a small flock of sheep.
» There Is bound to be a great deinant) for breeding stock and the Pacific
International will furnish an opportunity unequaled for securing foundation
stock.
Stain» Photo» Fixing.
The brown or yellow stains which
ate sometimes found on photographic
prints after being taken out of the
fixing bath can he prevented by mix
lng a tablespoonful of vmégar In the
water In which the prints are washed
after being developed.
O
o
Rentals
Notary Public
W.W. WILTON
REAL ESTATE
I
Fir* Insurance In Depend
able Campania -
©
CIDER
I have installed the latest sty Je of
"hydraulic cider press at my ranch.
Every Friday during- the season
will do custom work.
Bring- your apples and barrels and
I will make your cider for 10 cents
per gallon. ,
Will Have Sweet Cider for Sale at
Right Price.
J. R. FIELD
WITH "LEGS UNDER THE TABLE"
FULL OF GOOD THIIÏGS FROM OUR STORE
IT*5 A WONDER ONE IS ABLE.
TO WAIT 'TILL GRACE IS O'ER
1/3SI
TTUSE
I
[OUR WEEKLY RECIPE
CARAMEL FROSTING
1% c. light brown sugar, % c. thin cream, % tsp. butter.
Boil ingredients together in a smooth granite saucepan until a
Beat until
ball can be formed when mixture is tried in cold water,
of Eight consistency to spread.
SEIL THE INGREDIENTS
M. tIORJON
flAAOWAlU Sc OROCC R.IE5
□QlPilONE CB — f MMETT, IBÄäKB
fi\wt Woman to Join Union.
Thp first wornan ' ever admitted to a
j ra( | e un | 0n composed or men Is lie
jj^^j t0 |, uve 6een Miss Mary Baker,
wfa(> lfi the late sixties was unani
e i ec t e d to membership In the
p h j ca g 0 branch of the Internationa!
Typographical union.
GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
— and —
REPAIR WORK
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
H. D. Buys
Washington and Dion Streets
(Riverside Addition)
GERMAN GRIP ON
RARE SUGAR GONE
America Now Producing Costly
Sweets Used in the Detection
of Disease Germs.
RESULT OF WIR NECESSITY
Prompt Work of Chemists of Groat
Assistance In Fighting Typhoid
In A. E. F.—Elaborate Caro
Necessary.
New Tork—Germany's grip on the
sugar Industry has been broken
rare
at last by several American manufac
turera who are now able to produce
those costly sweets used In the de
tection of disease germs.
The most expensive of these, quoted
at several hundred dollars a pound
Is far beyond the reach of the average
housewife, and yet It plays an lm
portant part In scientific research and
must be obtained.
At the outbreak of the European
the group of rare sugars used in
laboratories was manufactured in
war
cur
Germany. The Teutons had such *
bold on the processes that they were
able at any time to destroy competl
ttoo.
One of these sugars is of exceptional
value In the detection of typhoid, as
the organisms of that disease are-so
fond of It that they naturally select
It and so multiply upon It that their
presence can readily be detected. The
military hospitals of the
States called upon members of the
American Chemical Society to co-op
erate In the making of rare bacteri
ological sugars for typhoid work, and,
according to a bulletin Issued by that
society these efforts soon proved suc
The fact that the health of
United
cessful.
the American expeditionary force In
France was so good was largely due
to the quest for typhoid germs which
was made possible by the preparation
of these unusual saccharine substances
In laboratories of the United States.
The Investigations which developed
from the employment of these agents
did much to forestall outbreaks of
typhoid fever and to Indicate the need
of special vigilance In vaccination
against that dread disease, which In
the Spanish American war caused
deaths than did the bullets of
more
the enemy.
Guido In Selecting Germs.
Other rare sugars are used as guides
In the detection of germs
are therefore invaluable aj weapons
against the pestilence which walks in
darkness.
Bacteriological or rare sugars re
quire the utmost care In handling, for
the presence of any Impurities or of
another kind of sugar renders them
unfit for the precise purposes for
which they are intended. It requires
the utmost patience and scientific
skill to put them through the various
steps of purification. Often through
some slight slip or mishap days of
work may be lost, and It Is necessary
to go back and repeat the processes
In order to obtain the required stand
ard.
This elaborate care Is responsible
for the seemingly enormous prices at
which the rare sugars are listed. High
as these costs may appear they are
said to yield only nominal profits to
the manufacturers.
The most expensive rare sugar
quoted In the catalogue Is duleltol, for
which $375 a pound Is asked.'
Mannose Is worth $140 a pound. The
ivory nut better known as "vegetable
ivory," is Imported In large quantities
from Ecuador, and Is used for the
manufacture of buttons for coats and
The chemist makes mannose
gowns.
from the scraps of the button fac
tories, btrt the high cokt of the result
ing product is due to the many ac
curate processes through which he
must put it tn order to obtain abso
lute purity.
Sugar From Manna.
Another sugpr is ma unite, derived
from manna, that nutritive gum with
which the Bible tells us the children
of Israel were miraculously fed during
their wanderings in the Wilderness.
Manna is secreted from a tree and
forma In thin scales, which at. certain
times and under unusual weather con
ditions may be blown high into the
air by the wind and then deposited
npon the ground. The Biblical narra
tive recounts that the Hebrews found
the bread from heaven lying upon
the earth In the early hours of the
morn. As manna has a delicate and
delirious taste which resembles that
of a sweet wafer, it is not so good
when long exposed to the air—as is :
alao told in Holy Writ j
Xyiose, held at $120 a pound, ^ Is
the dahlia, but can be obtained at only j
Other rare sugars are : Artbtnose, for ;
which 9100 a pound is asked; levu
lose, an 980 a pound product ; and raf
finose, for which the manufacturing j
chemist receives 978 a pound,
Only small quantities of these su- :
made from the lowly corn cob.
Inuitn la derived from the bulbs of
certain seasons of the year.
gars are employed at a time in the j
laboratory, so they are usually sold
In 28 gramme bottles, or by the
ounce. An ounce of some of them
would last even a busy bacteriologist
American chemists feel that in pla
ring these aids to medicine at the dis
position of research a distinct step
baa been made on the road to ehern
lad independence.
« year.
TkKlTCM
m 9
<©> 1921, WMt«n nt«ip*p«r UnJoa.)
He who would bring homo the wealth
of the Indie» must carry the wealth
of the Indie» with him, »ay» the Span
ish proverb. So it If In traveling; a
mar. must carry knowledge with him
If he would bring home knowledge.
HOT WEATHER GOOD THINGS.
A good-sized fowl Is not always
made tender by ordinary cooking. The
following method
Is s good one :
Out the fowl In
pieces at the
Joints, wash and
dry, roll in sea
soned tlour and
fry brown in hot
fat. Pnt Into a
baking pan, sprinkle over It one-half
cupful of celery and two tablespoon
fuls of minced onion. Cover with hot
water ; place another pan over It and
cook in the oven until tender. More
water may be needed If the chicken
Is an old one.
Cottage Chicken.—To two cupfuls
of cooked chicken, cut In pieces, add
one cupful of cooked macaroni, one
half a large canned pimento, one
half of a grated onion. Prepare a
white sauce, using one cupful each of
milk and chicken broth, three level
tablespoonfuls each of butter and
flour with one teaspoonful of salt:
mix with the first combination and
cover with a rich biscuit dough. To
keep the gravy from going into the
crust, place an Inverted cup or small
bowl, well greased. In the center of
the dish before pouring In the gravy.
The gravy will thus go under the cup.
Loosen the crust and remove the
bowl before serving.
Watermelon Cocktail.—Cut a chilled
melon Into thick slices, remove the
seeds and cut out with a vegetable
stamp or a potato cutter Into balls
or shapes. Sprinkle with a little pow
dered sugar and serve In stemmed
glasses as a beginning for a luncheon
or dinner.
Peach Betty.—Use the soft crumbs
from the center of a stale loaf of
bread. Mix three cupfuls of crumbs
with one-half cupful of melted but
ter. Have ready a pint and a half of
sliced peaches. Put the buttered
crumbs and fruit In layers In a bak
ing dish, sprinkle each layer with
sugar, grated orange or lemon peel.
Bake one hour. Cover the dish during
the first half of the cooking, but re
move to brown the crumbs. Serve hot,
with sugar and cream. Apples may
be used in place of peaches, or any
'IheKtrcnm
asm
(©, 1921, Western Newspaper Union.)
Seldom, if ever, vu any knowledge
given to keep, but to impart. The
grace of this rich jewel ia lost in con
cealment—Bishop Hall.
WHAT TO EAT.
It Is not necessary to be a graduate
of household economics to understand
planning a well
balanced ration of
palatable and nu
trltous food ; but
It Is essential that
study .should be
put upon the se
lection of foods,
for a small
amount of food rightly combined win
give Jtnore energy than a large
amount lily combined. Some one has
said that the selection and organiza
tion of f >od In the diet is as Impor
tant as the organization of an army.
A properly disciplined force of soldiers
Is more effective than an untrained
mob, we will agree.
One of the essential things to re
member is the different groups of
foods :
I Aw,
»1
sa it 8i vegetable acids and body-regu
lating substances. This is a most im
portant group and has been slighted
In the planning of the ration far too
We find these substances In
np pies, ]«ears, berries, melons, oranges,
lemons and other fruits; In salads of
gre en vegetables, such as lettuce and
cre ss; In greens, like spinach, green
peas , tomatoes and squash,
when purchasing supplies for the
1. Foods which provide protein
which builds muscle; these are milk,
eggs, cheese, meat, poultry, dried
peas, beans and lentils, as well as
fish.
2. Foods which furnish u« starch
and sugar; these are cereals, meals,
flours, bread, macaroni, potatoes and
such starchy foods; sugar in various
forms such as honey, molasses, can
dies and sweet fruits, preserves, sweet
cakes and desserts.
Sup
3. Foods which furnish fat.
, cream, olive oil, com
: Ark, suet and other
plied by butter
oil, bacon, salt
cooking fats.
4. Foods which supply mineral
often.
family table think in terms of these
Some housemother will say:
groups.
- My family will not eat such and such
foods, or certain members of my fam
w tn not eat the kinds cf food
necessary for them to keep in perfect
health." With rare exceptions this Is
admitting your own lack of properly
training the children to eat the things
that they should eat
M . . . * j\ 4 a
I w •
Think of This. Bachelors.
The happy married inan d es In good
stile at home, surrounded by his weep
ing wife and children. The old bach
elor don't die at all—he sort of rots
away, like a pollywog's tall.- -Artemns
Ward in "The Draft In BaidinsvlMe."
T
Aero-Cushion Inner Tires
No Punctures, Blow Outs, Rim Cuts, Flat
Tires or Road Delays
* Instead you get Double Mileage and save temper, time,
tires and trouble. End your tire troubles by using Aero
Cushion Tires. Nails and spikes do not hurt them. See
H. D. BUYS, Emmett, Idaho
Local Agent
92
92
$2
$2
$2
?2
$2
$2

Don't Worry About
House Cleaning
This Fall--
«
\
<N
$2.00
»
Is All It Takes to Put an
OHIOorHOOVER
u
Electric Vacuum Cleaner
in Your Home Now
N
Balance in Small Monthly Payments
to
Put one of these good cleaning plants in
your home now and have a clean, dustless
house with little effort.
THE OHIO is now offered at $50—
terms of $2.00 down and $4.00 a month.
Call or phone for a demonstration today.

Electric Shop
Idaho Power Co.
<M
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Beat Old Man
Winter To It!
He
You've got the jump on him.
isn't quite here yet and you have
time to tighten your defences.
First, there's the house to be made
How about the
That's where protection
cozy and warm,
floors? . 1 .
counts. A good, tight floor will save
its weight in coal.
Then the barn. What can be done
to make it safer and more comforta
ble for the stock? Put new shingles
your roofs to keep out the rain
and snow.
on
Money Well Invested
These little repairs make home life
cheerful and they protect the
more
stock and machinery.
Our sales manager is always glad
to assist a customer in planning re
pairs along the most practical lines.
H. D. MAC VEAN, Manager Emmett Yard
Boise-Payette Lumber Co.
Mouse Kept Receipted Bill.
A worker In a house near Derby
academy, Hingham. found a piece of
paper In a mouse nest which prosed
to he a receipted bill for the construc
tion of" the nouse and was dated 200
years ago.

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