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Wood River times. [volume] (Hailey, Idaho) 1882-1915, May 20, 1882, Image 1

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WOOD RIVER TIMES.
VOL. I.—WO. 1.
HAILEY, IDAHO, SATURDAY, MAY 20. 1882.
(TWELVE AND ONE-HALF
} CENTS PER COPY.
WOOD RIVER TIMES
HAILEY, IDAHO.
Published Every Evening, Sundays Excepted.
OFFICE: TIMES BUILDING, S. E. COR.
MAIN AND CROY STREETS.
Subscription Rates:
On* copy, one year, by mail............... $20 00
On* copy, ail months, by mail............ 10 00
One copy, three months, by mall.......... 5 00
One copy, one month, by mail.......... j gg
One copy, one week, delivered by carrier! so
Single copies..............................
Mail subscribers are required to pay in ad
vauce.
Advertising Rates
Furnished on application at the office, or to any of
our Agents.
T. E. PICOTTE, Publisher
Frank P. Cavanah,
U. S. Dept. Mineral Surveyor,
—AND—
MIKING ENGINEER.
HAILEY,......IDAHO
LAND OFFICE ATTORNEY.
W.
•Ives prompt snd careful attention to land and
Mineral papers, patents, and contested esses.
Office with Frank P. Cavanah.
S. B. Miller, M.D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Hailey, Idaho.
Office and residence: On Bullion street, between
Main snd Biver streets.
Calls Attended promptly, day and night.
Or. W. M, KILLER,
SUBGEOV DKNTIST,
'Office and residence: With Dr. 8. B. Miller.
EDWARD B. TRUE, C. E.,
DEPUTY
U. S. MINERAL SURVEYOR,
Hailej-, Idaho.
T.N.Snow,M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Bellevue, Idaho.
Dr. W. D. Wheeler,
Surgeon and Physician.
(Graduate of the Miami Mediral College of Cin
cinnati, Ohio. Licensed under the medical law of
Illinois and the late law of California.)
Office in Burch building, first door south ef
postoffice, Bellevue, Idaho.
U. B. Kinobbury.
A. J. McGowan.
Kingsbury & McGowan,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Hailey, Idaho.
T. Angel,
ATTO RN E Y-AT-L A W
BULKY, IDAHO.
Frank Ganahl,
Attorney-at-Law,
HAILEY.....
IDAHO
W. F. ANDERSON,
ATTORNEY - AT - LA W,
Hailey, Idaho.
Xycurgus Vineyard,
Attorney-at-Law,
HAILEY.......IDAHO
F. E. Ensign,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
'Will practice in all the Court*.
N« M. Ruick,
Attorney-at-Law,
Deputy District Attorney Second
Judicial District,
BELLEVUE, . . (Wood River) . . IDAHO
Office next io Kurey'* store.
J. H. HARRIS,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Bellevue, Idaho.
Office in Teeney's building.
A. J. BKUNKR. P. M. BKl'NEU.
BRUNER & BRUNER,
Attorneys-at-Law,
Bellevue, Idaho
Will practice in ail the court*. Mining law a
specialty.
Office in Teeney's building.
W. H. Johnson,
Attorney at Law and Notary Public,
BELLEVUE, IDAHO.
^WUI practice in *11 /the Court* of the Territory.
Wp**i*l attention given to collection*. Remittance*
■** 4 * am Jv «f collection
SMELTING FURNACES FOR WOOD
RIVER.
Appliances that will Insure Success in
Treating Our Ores.
The Pacific Iron Works, Rankin,
Brayton & Co., of San Francisco,
have recently shipped a 40-ton smelt
ing plant to the Philadelphia Co. at
Ketchum. This with the smelter
and sampling works constructed by
this firm, for the same company,
last fall makes a complete plant of
the capacity of 80 tons per day.
The same firm have, also, just com
pleted an 80 ton plant for the Little
Wood River company, to be erected
at once on the Muldoon mine. Roth
of these enterprises arc owned and
operated by the Philadelphia com
panies under the general manage
ment of Col. Green, a gentleman of
large experience in mining opper
ations in California. No expense
has been spared to make these works
the most perfect and complete in all
their appointments of any that have
ever been constructed. The amount
of bullion they will turn out when
fairly in operation will convince the
most skeptical as to the resources of
the Wood river country. The Pacific
Iron Works' smelters, for both gal
ena and copper ores, have worked a
revolution in the smelting business
of the country, and it made a success
of many an enterprise that would
have otherwise been a failure.
The advantages demonstrated in
these furnaces are facility and cheap
ness of transportation and construc
tion, economy of fuel, fineness of
bullion produced, and capacity for
continuous and uninterrupted work.
Any ore that can be smelted, it
is claimed, can be worked cheaper in
in these furnaces than by any other
process.
The mining interests of the coun
try arc largely indebted to the enter
prise of this firm for working up to
such a state of perfection this im
portant branch of mining machinery.
A large number of companies in Ar
izona, New Mexico and Nevada are
operating these furnaces with most
satisfactory results. And we feel as
sured that nothing will insure the
success of our various smelting
enterprises so much as the general
adoption of these approved appli
ances for treating ores.
A TRAGEDY RECALLED.
Unexpected Conviction of the Lawyer
Who Shot Ex-Judge Thurmond in a
Court Room.
Dallas, Texas, May 7.—On March
14, 1882, Robert E. Cowart, a leading
lawyer of this city, killed ex-Judge
J. M. Thurmond in the County Court
room. Thurmond was a well-known
politician in this part of the State,
was bitter in his hatreds, and a nat
ural-born agitator. Great enmity
had existed between Cowart and
Thurmond, growing out of Cowart's
appearing as counsel for the city
when Thurmond was voted out (if
the office of Mayor three years ago
by the City Council. A bitter speech
was delivered by Cowart in the can
vass when Thurmond ran for Mayor
to fill the vacancy caused by his re
moval, and in which Thurmond was
defeated. This bitterness was in
creased in February last, when Thur
mond entered thomunicipal canvass
as a candidate for Alderman of the
Second Ward. A small evening pa
per, since suspended, contained a
number of articles extremely bitter
against Cowart and others, and no
doubt existed that Thurmond was
the author. The culmination came
in the tragedy of March 14, when
Cowart killed Thurmond. He was
shot while advancing on Cowart with
a heavy cane in his left hand, and in
the act of drawing a pistol from his
hip pocket with his right hand, ex
claiming, "Draw, damn you; lam
ready for you." Public sentiment
was almost unanimously with Co
wart, as it was believed that it was
a clear case of self-defense. He was
arrested and afterwards released on
habeas corpus, with a bond of $800.
The trial of ('owart on a charge of
murder in the first degree came up
on Monday last, and occupied all the
week. Great interest has been man
ifested in the proceedings, the court
house being crowded all the time,
night and day. It took over two
days to get a jury, so many persons
i had formed an opinion. The testi
j mony was very favorable to Cowart,
! and when the ease was given to the
jury on Friday night tho general
opinion was that he would be ac
quitted. Four brothers of Thur
mond were present from various
points in Texas and Arizona, and
all the week the community has been
listening to rumors that Cowart
would be killed if acquitted. Con
sequently Sheriff Jones had all his
deputies, a number of special otli
eers, and a part of the city police
force on duty at the court house
Friday night and j'esterday to pro
tect the prisoner and preserve the
peace. The jury could not agree
Friday night, but yesterday morning
thej' surprised everybody by render
ing a verdict of guilty of murder in
the second degree. The Court sen
tenced Cowart to the penitentiary
for seven years.
Yesterday morning's Herald con
tained a severe criticism of the jury,
charging that some of them were
drunk that night and not deliberat
ing on the case. A reporter had
gotten into an adjoining room and
Hstened. When the jury heard of
the publication they were very in
dignant. They certified to the
Court that no liquor was in the jury
room. The Herald proprietors were
fined $100 for contempt, and the
jurymen are starting libel suits for
damages.
Cowart's counsel moved for a new
trial, which came up for argument
at 6 p. m. Meanwhile newspaper
reporters investigated the charges
against the jury, and soon traced
three bottles of whisky to different
jurymen, and the publication of the
facts in the Evening Times added
interest to the case. The motion for
a new y-ial was argued before Judge
Aldridge last night. The court
house was packed, the most promi
nent citizens being present. All
necessary precautions were again
taken. The motion was granted,
and the spectators attempted to ap
plaud, but the applause was sup
pressed by the Court. After the
adjournment Cowart received the
congratulations of his friends. The
new trial was granted on the ground
that the verdict was not in accord
ance with the evidence.
BERNHARDT'S BRIDAL.
Mhy She Finally Consented to Take a
Husband.
[S. F. Paper.]
"Mamma, where is my fader?"
" Sarah dropped her chizel in
amazement. The impudence of her
daughter was new and astonishing.
"Mind your own business," she
said angrily. "How do you suppose
I know."
The child began to blubber. " I
want a fader; gimme a fader."
" Keep your mous shut 't.ite bote,"
snapped her mamma. " E is in busi
ness in Paree an" gone to New York
art' mekkin trip to Algerie. How
you suppose I can tell?"
The child began to roar. She
wanted a father to play with. All
the other little girls had fathers, and
she was going to have one if it took
every lung in her body.
Sarah called the nurse.
Nanette gave her some bon bons;
but bon bons were a drug in tiie
youthful market. She was dissolv
ing in tears and roaring like a toy
pirate.
Nanette said: " Mon Dieu, Ma
dame. I can do nossing wiz her.
She will have a fader or she will die."
Sara knit her brows thoughtfully.
" Lcmme see," she said. "It is many
days since I am not in ze papers.
Ze hemorrahe bizness is played out.
Besides, it is copy of Clara Morns,
which is unworzy of my genius. Dry
oop, petite," she said affectionately
to the child. " I git you a fader."
" Ouieh one?" queried Nanette,
wonderingly.
" Damala. He is a Greek. Mek
more talk. Go tell 'im."
Damala came. He waved his
hand with Grecian grace. "Whatta!"
he said; "you ketcha de matterimo
nia?"
" Yes."
" Whatta for?"
" t or instans," and Sara laughed
merrily.
"Alla righta, my angela; I go fix."
And the marriage bells chimed
merrily, and all the world said
" Bernhardt again," and the Bern
bardt child was happy.
An Editor in Heaven.
A story is told of an editor who
died and went to Heaven, but was
| denied admittance, lest he might
meet a delinquent subscriber and
bad feelings be called up to the de
triment of that peaceful abode. Huv
ing to go somewhere, he went to the
region of darkness, but was posi
tively refused admittance, as the
place was full of delinquent sub
scribers. Wearily the poor editor
turned back to the celestial city, and
was met by the watchman at the
portals, who smiled and said: "I was
mistaken; you can enter; there isn't
a delinquent subscriber in Heaven!"
The First Freight of the Season.
Kails, all sizes, from 3-penny to C0
peuny, enough to supply all of Wood
River, just received at Cliff <& McKay's,
Main street, Hailey.
SEX IN MINERAL VEINS.
A New Theory, the Soundness of Which
Can Be Tested in this Section.
The following curious communication,
signed by J. Van Cleve Phillips, appears
in a late issue of the London Mining
Journal:
In reading Fourier's Philosophy in a
new book by Van Buren Denslow, called
"Modern Thinkers," and having read
Erasmus Darwin's "Love of the Plants"
(Dublin, 17!*.>; grandfather of the late
Darwin), I find inv idea of sex in min
eral veins fortified'. M v study of the up
per Mississippi lead fields was from 1st:
to 1853, and of the Missouri lead fields
from 1855 to 1880 : 1. Tho lead fields are
basins of limestone, these being from 100
yards to five miles wide, and the vein
system duplicated in each basin. 2. All
the discoveries of ores in the upper Mis
sissippi ami Missouri lead fields may he
located geographically in the basin
where they occur, and stratagraphieallv
in the rock and family of veins to which
they belong. The lead ores mined in
these fields have yielded to date $150,
000,000 worth of lead, all of which has
been taken from tho small basins, or
along the edges of the larger ones, and is
trom the edge of the vein system, and
will not include 1-fiOth of 1 per cent, of
the ores contained in the basins, as
shown in my unpublished geological
surveys of the upper and lower Missis
sippi lead fields. It will he seen from
this that tiic existence of lead and zinc
is now known which will supply the
people of tlie center of the continent
with these metals when it shall have a
population of 300 to tlie square mile, as
England lias to-day.
M.v first attention to the physical out
line of the crystalliz; tion of lead ( re was
in 1848, while superintending a lead fur
nace in Wisconsin. The teams were
bringing in ores from twenty different
lead discoveries, having north and south
veins, cast and west veins, and stratified
veins from the rock and clay. The cast
and west veins had regular cubes, the
north and south veins had the edges of
the cubes truncated, and the horizontal
veins had the solid angles of the tubes
cut off or truncated. The ores from the
clay were amorphous, and this form of
crystallization was duplicated in each
lead basin. This went to establish the
fact that tho lead-producing and crystal
line action liad been directly connected
with the vein system in all'p,arts of the
lead basin; that the same force which
had been exerted to till the vein system
in one basin of limestone had duplicated
that system in the adjacent basins, and
the physical outline of the ore was an in
dex of its geographical and stra Digraph i
eal position in the basin. Afterwards I
was led to the conclusion that the
north and south veins were the
positive or male veins, and the
j;as* and west the negative or
female veins. The north and south
veins were few in number, the east
and west veins many, and the north
and south veins always pointed low
aids the basins of the east and west
veins. This law is noticed in tin
animal and vegetable kingdoms, in
the sheep and goat families, and in
the cherry and apple trees, the males
being in the minority . In applying
this law to iron ores we sup, ose the
magnetic ores are the positive or
male ores, other varieties the nega
tive or female ores. In the silver
fields the Comstock, being a north
and south vein, would be a positive
or male vein, and the east and west
' lens of New Mexico and old Mexico
the negative or female veins.
The great vein known as San Pie
tro, in the town of Hidalgo del Par
ral, is an east and west vein; also
the largest and richest mine worked
at the old Spanish mining town of
lode, in the State of Durango, Mex
ico, and known as the Del Aqua
(water mine), is an east and west
vein. I am not sufficiently ac
quainted with the courses of the
veins in the mountain States to ap
ply this law of sex to the vein sys
tem of the numerous silver and gold
bearing fields, yet I have identified
it in tiie vein system of the upper
and lower lead fields of the basin of
the Mississippi, and feel assured
that it can be applied to all the fam
ilies of veins which, as a rule, are
aggregated around a central knob or
Boofa, which forms the water shed
of individual families of veins, and
which families as aggregated form
the great stellar silver' belt from
Montana south through New and
Old Mexico, and that by close ob
servation the explorer and miner may
profit by its application.
A GOOD DISTINCTION.
An Arizonian Who Thinks that there
arc Cowboys and Cowboys.
To the Editor of the Sun —Sir:
I notice in the morning Washington
dispatches that tho President, on the
advice ot the Cabinet, has determin
ed to issue a proclamation calling
upon the cowboys of Arizona to dis
band, and in the event of their re
fusal, to turn loose the army upon
them. Being myself an Arizonian,
and recently from there, and know
ing the situation, and also to whom
the epithet cowboy is applied, I was
much amused at this threatened pro
nunciamento. Tho term cowboy is
a Texas name applied to men who
are employed on cattle ranches. In
Arizona, every man who wears big
spurs, a broad bat. and the legs of
his pantaloons stuffed into his boots
is called a cowboy, and for the most
part they are employed njioii ranches
as vaqueros, herding cattle. There
is no organization among them. Yet
the President orders them to dis
band. What does he mean? Is it
that they must put on white shirts
and engage in other pursuits? The
proclamation will bo directed against
one of the most important industries
of the Territory—stock raising. If
the army is to be used to hunt down
criminals, why not say so, and not
by proclamation insult and slander
hundreds of law-abiding citizens en
gaged in cattle raising? In conclus
ion, permit me to say that this whole
thing is claptrap and buncombe.
Nkw Y'ouk, "May 3. Cochise.
Jones & Fox,
Real Estate ani lining Brokers,
Office: Over Riley k Tracy's drug-store,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
Complete abstracts of records of Alturas county.
Conveyancing a specialty.
H. Z BURKHART,
TT OTARY IFTTIBIAia
INSURANCE BROKER,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
John H. Bacon,
ASSAYER,
Office: Main street, opposite Grand Central hotel,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
Ores carefully sampled and assayed. Every
assay given at its true value.
m. McFarland, c. e.,
DEPUTY
U. S. Mineral Surveyor,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
MRS. F. C. MITCHELL,
In stone building, corner Second avenue and Car
bonate street, Hailey, Idaho,
DRESSMAKER,
Agent for Mine. Demorest's patterns.
Fred. Hunnel,
(Formerly of Hill k Hunnel,)
Carpenter and * Joiner,
Carbonate street, in rear of Rupert's store,
IIAILEY, IDAHO.
Plans and specifications furnished. Estimates
given at lowest living rates.
William Specht,
CABINET-MAKER
C A III* ENT U It AND JOINER,
. ...IDAHO.
ctly in rear of the
IIAILEY,.....
Shop: On the nlle;
Grand Central Hotel.
Special attention paid to fitting up offices and
st >res. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Tables, bedsteads, and spring mattresses, of the
best workmanship, at reasonable prices, on hand
and made to order.
T. R. JONES,
BANKE
Salt Lake City, Utah,
____and____
Hailey, Idaho.
Transacts a general banking business in all its
branches.
Dealer in foreign and domestic exchange.
Careful attention given to collections, and re
mittunces made on cloy <*t payment.
Long loans made on city real estate at low rate*
of interest.
Special attention given to the selling of ores and
bullion, of which consignments are solicited.
Advances madj: on base bullion, gold and silver
bars shipped for refining.
CORRESPONDENTS:
New York —J. Ii. Colgate k Co.
Omaha—Omaha National Bank.
San Francisco-—Bank of California.
Redwood and Native
East side Main street, between Bullion and
Carbonate streets,
HAILEY, IDAHO.
Always on hand: Inch and inch and a-half
surfaced redwood and rustic;
Native lumber of all descript ions, double and
single sash doors, planed doors, and
window sashes of ail sizes.
HALL, CEDERH0LH k CO.
& WILLIS
dealers in
Wines, Liquors, and Cigars.
West Side Main Street,
between Carbonate and Galena Streets,
IIAILEY.
Sole agents for the famouB
Milwaukee, St. Louis, and Boca
Beer, and Gold Lion Whisky.
$66
a week in your own town. $5 outfit
free. No risk. Everything new.
Capital not required. We will fur
nish you everything. Many are
making fortunes. Ladies make a*
h ns men, and boys and girls
make great pay. Reader, if you want a business
at which you <>»n make great pay *11 the time you
work, writ* for particular* to H H.VLLETT A CO.|
Portland, Maine.
W. B. NOBLE,
NORTHEAST CORNER MAIN AND CAR
BONATE STREETS,
, HAILEY,
IDAHO,
DEALER IN
Groceries and Provisions,
HATS AND CAPS,
ROOTS AND SHOES,
CLOTHING,
SHELF HARDWARES,
AND CROCKERY*,
Wines, Liquors, Tobaccos
and Cigars.
A full line of
MINING SU PPLIES.
RILEY & TRACY
DRUCCISTS,
Northwest cor. Main and Bullion sta.,
IIAILEY, IDAHO,
Dealers ia
Perfumery, Fancy Goods,
Stationery and Blank Books,
Fishing Tackle, Paints,
Oils, Dye Stufik,
Varnishes,
Toilet Articles, Etc.
Bole Agents on Wood River for
Dr. Hohly's Miners' Bitters,
A specific cure for Painters' Colic and a aa.
preventative of lead and antinionial
poisoning, to which all lead min
ers and smelters are liable.
Prescriptions filled by eompiUst
potliecaries.
AND CONFECTIONERY,
MAIN STREET,
Next to White's Furniture Store.
HAILEV, IDAHO.
FEES ifGAN DIES,
Taffies, Caromels. etc., manufactured daily.
Also, Bread, Pies, Cakes, Rolls, Rusks, etc.
We are both practical men and will run a first
class establishment.
SOLANDER & COBURN, Prop's.
CLIFF & M K AY,
.DEALERS IN....
Mining Supplies, Stoves and Tin
ware, Paints and Oils, etc.
TINSMITTIING
•ad all kinds of Job Work done to order.
HATLEY, IDAHO.
H. SHAFER.
SHAFER & CO.,
o-em saloo nsr,
Fourth street (next door to Tribe's),
OGDEN, UTAH.
M. J. O'NEILL. H. SHAFER. T. SALTER.
M. J. O'NEILL & CO.,
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGAflS,
Fifth Street,
OG-ZDZEJST, TTT.A.H.
FOB SALE AT COST.
A cottage of taro room*, comfortably
*nd taro lots 30 il 20 , with sice gard*a
vegetable*, with plenty of water tat
....... ' ' '
will b« sold for coat.

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