OCR Interpretation


The Idaho recorder. [volume] (Salmon City, Idaho) 1886-1927, March 21, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091188/1919-03-21/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

PAPE'S OIAPEPSIN
FOR INDIGESTION
KAT one TABLET! NO GASES.
ACIDITY, DYSPEPSIA OR ANY
STOMACH MISERY.
Cnd'gcsted fmxi: I.umps of pain;
••ichitig bur, acids and Nournmtu. \Vh«*u
four ■fomiu ti is all upset, Here Is In
•tant relief—No waiting !
P
The moment yon eat u tablet or .t wo
•f i'ape's 1 Mil pepsin all the lndig«-*non
(tain Hnd dy«|>cp»in cilHtreaa »tops.
Your disordered stomach will feel
One at pnec.
These pleasant, harmless tablet* of
Pape'M Dinii. psin never fall und eost
eery little at drug stores. Adv.
Where Valkyries Ruth In.
We have fried to be sane in the
matter of |Mipulnr prejmllee against
fiertnnn imisle, hut when a five-piece
picture-show orchestra iimlertakes to
play I he ••Hide of the Valkyries,'* then
tfce A. I*. I,, anil It* allied forces of
suppression cannot act too quickly to
•ult M.-^Kansas City Star.
OPEN NOSTRILS! END
A COLO OR CATARRH
How To Get Relief When Head
and Noeo are Stuffed Up.
County fifty f Tour cold In head or
catarrh disappears. Your clogged no*
trtle will open, the air passages of your
head will dear and yon can breathe
freoly. No more snuffling, hawking,
mneoua discharge, dryness or head
■rhe: no struggling for breath at night.
Get a small bolfle of Ely's Cream
Ralm from your druggist and apply a
Mttlo of this fragrant antiseptic cream
•o yonr nostrils. It penetrates through
•wry air passage of the head, soothing
•,nd healing th«* swollen or Inflamed
•nuenua membrane, giving you Instant
rollof. Head colds and catarrh yield
like magic. Don't stay stuffed-up and
miserable. Relief is sure.—Adv.
Different Reactions
The Human-Il-r-r-r ! I think I'll go
Routh. '
The Bird—WheeI I think III go
North.
SAGE TEA BEAUTIFIES •
AND DARKENS HAIR
OwYt Stay Gray! It Darkene So
Naturally that Nobody
can Tell.
Too cen turn gray, faded hair hcau
(tfully dark and lustrous almost over
•light If you'll get a bottle of "Wyeth's
Heg« and .Sulphur Compound" at any
drug store. Millions of bottles of this
•Id famous Sage Tea Recipe, Improved
toy the addition of other Ingredients,
er« eold annually, nays a well-known
druggist here, because It darkens the
hair eo naturally and evenly that no
«•« can tell It has been applied.
Thom« whose hair Is turning gray nr
hecondng faded have a surprise await
ing them, because after one or two
•ppllfiitlone the gray hair vanishes
•ml your locks become luxuriantly
dark and beautiful.
This la the age of youth. Oray
hatred. unattractive folks aren't
wanted around, so get husv with
Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur Compound
to-night and you'll he delighted with
your dark, handsome hair and your
youthful appearance within a few
days.—Adv,
Getting Bored.
Knicker What were you wonihT
Hocker W'ticu trillions w III come In
«style.
FREI INFORMATION
FOR HOMC8ECKKR«.
The G 8. Railroad Adminifctretmn has
assembled information r> guiding hrm op
nortumtirs in the M-versI states, and will
famish it teJwnirwfUn free on request
mwly
h«-«d
The work will b* done through the m-wly
wUIiImM hi'iiw en li-r '
•«tarter* in Washington
*'W# era receiving »Unit 1,000 letter* •
week from person* who wish to engage
In farming, said J. L. Edwards, nisntget
of the Agricultural Section of the C. S
llatlcisid Administration "Tlie inquiries
«war from every state, asking about agrt
ratltursl advantage« in undeveloped tern
*»wy. We furnish dependable data, snd
through our ««true many investors have
hern able to hud ju*t wlist they were
ktoking for.
"Our information is put out in form
»( illustrated Issiklets, hi «totes, sent (o
Musse suttiitruth intmestrd to »rile and
Ml a* wlva« kind of a farm project they
bave in muni, and •taming the state the
•>Pt««>rt uni dee in wliirli tltev desire to in
festigst«? Mumrvi'vkers von lind in the
I nurd States productive laud at tvivw
able prices and on hlwral term«, tirât rUs
markets, evcellent transportai ion facill
ties, a satisfactory climate and ideal liv
i«v«| cvndttiohs Now that the war is over,
I look for a revival of form development
bejron «1 that of mi pre war pent»! '' for
>ndeiii e from Viomeseekcrs is solle Ur-1
Addrvfs*. ltisun 'June. IP inex-eker*' Muresu,
C S li cln a I \<)iniuisi ration. Wssh.ng
ton. D C \dv
...
Faint l>rai*
of words.
will net olivtruct a flow
all a man n fool ;
ich to posent tt
Your
Eyes
I Gtaoulaled Eyelids,
K«c* inflamed by up.».
•utt to Sea. Devi and «1*4
quick » relieved Hv Me«tae
j f *r(?ri»ed>. N'oS uarung,
-- -- J 1 '»» l**t Comfort At
Vow Dt.ia,«,or by ma,! ftv c per Bottle.
lot Meek fl Ike fy« free «ente eu
«F« Remedy Ct^ Chlcago
BRITISH NAVAL OFFICER
HONORED FOR G ALLANTRY
Awarded the Distinguished Serv
ice Medal by President
Wilson.
----
SAVES BOO YANK SOLDIERS
------ -----
j
I
i
I
I
i
i
I
j
I
i
Coes to Assistance of Transport
Otranto When She Was Sunk in
Collision Off Irish Coast With
American Troops on
Board.
By E. W. BARRETT
Editor Birmingham Age Herald
If ever a man were enftfled to the
fffstlnguisheil service medal, it was
that yqu it g British lieutenant, l-'ran
els \V Craven ol the destroyer Moun
•ey.
V dispatch from London announced
that I'rcsldcnt Wilson had awarded
blur this medal and thin Maj. Gen. Bid
dle. commander of the American
forces In Ijie Lulled Kingdom, had
presented it to him.
The medal was awarded. In the
Words of tlie London cable, "In Lieut.
Francis W. Craven, who commanded
the British destroyer Mounsey, which
saved HMO American soldiers from the
British transport iitranio, when she
was sunk in a collision off Hie Irish
coast on Oct. I», 11118. wllli the loss
of .'157 America ii soldiers."
Though the British government con
ferred no honor upon Lieut. Craven for
Ids work, because Ii was not nn net
of valor In war combat, no uiun In any
navy ever showed more courage nor
demonstrated more perfect seanmu
shlp than did Lieut, Craven on this
occasion.
*Tlie full story Is worth telling, now
ttial the censorship Is off and no fur
ther obligation rests upon the news
paper man who was in the offing, so
to speak, when this horror of (lie sea
occurred.
Flagship of Convoy.
The Otranto, w deli went down, was
the flagship of a convoy of fourteen
troop laden. Influenza Infected ships
which sailed from New York on Sept.
'-It last. She was a British Australian
liner, with something like a thousand
Americati soldier hoys aboard. On her
sister ship. I In- I »routes, a nasty old
plague Infected refrigerator freighter
with limited and dirty passenger ac
commislalions, eighteen huhdred sol
dier hoys, the writer and about fifty
oilier passengers were erovvdis) to
gether like cuttle.
We were accompanied from New
York by a hattl
destroyer. The i
the north of I
Irish channel i<
Kill
hip, a cruiser and a
was io he around
•laud and down the
Liverpool. All sorts
of hard luck hit the convoy and pur
tlctilnfly the. Iltrnnto. She first ran
Into a fishing Meet and cut down two
boats, hut saved the crews. In doing
she fell behind, but caught up
when we ran Into a fearful storm and
ont limed buttling against It for sev
ntl days.
Scattered In Storm.
Before reaching British waters
north of Ireland, the American naval
vessels turned hack or were scattered
In the storm. l»ur old ship was si rug
gling and our captain was begging In
wireless messages to ('apt. 1'avhlsoti
of the «Mrniitn fur more sen room,
lie feared going on the rocky shores
of North Ireland ('apt. Davidson
made no answer to repotted calls.
Then our wireless went down, out
boats were crushed, tli
doors and lions wen* smashed In. th
galleys, dining saloon and many state
rooms were Hooded Only cold foods
were obtainable. To make matters
worst*. -UNI soldier hoys were down
with pneumonia. They were dying
... ...... ... ,n I" 1 '' 11 *' i-ooms and
on maîtresses strewn about wherever
there was enclosed room. Medicines
were exhausted, and dead and dying
were all about.
In the meantime every ship put
«bout lo save Its own, heading Into
the sturm. The Otranto and other
ships not heeding our captain s warn
lugs were almost upon the rocks of
Ireland A veritable hurricane was
blowing. Waves broke entirely over
III.« ships.
Thu Otranto, In trying to get out of
its predicament, to rural across the
. , . , !V. k .l!'*. rn !!! n ! .
.......'
WHIPPET TANKS USED IN PEACE WORK
1
f
«
I ortm-rly deadly «•>. g ti. •* . f wer. tin-,« whipuet
manth-,1 and arc ,..,w he enqjh.yeff in Kramv In „«
"but oue hauls a coital boat
Âlàî. ; "A
tanks have been dis-
-tul agru-itltanU work.
» ailed with tootUiufls for [Uo iuterior.
^
Ss.
Ihcv of the Kio-htncr»*, another crior
I mous old freighter crowded with!
I troops. The Kiishmcre's how eut i
1 through her sides mid deep into 1 er
engine room, stopping her engines arid
' lining mil 1e r lighting system Ml»
r; ^
dared attempt assistance. Each was 1
I struggling to save itself.
Mounsey to the Rescue.
► Th-n emae the little d<*8tro>er Mnua ,
«■'•>. plic.dug through the wuvi ike a
submarine. She managed in nia m
I beside tlic foundering ship. I.i l'eteint»
hud been lowered, hilt Wen «mashed
in. and the little Mounsey was pound
j lug against the liull of the big ship
first Jammed against the side and then
I knocked far off. In the meantime
tlie soldier hoys Jumped fur their lives j
toward the deck of the little destroyer,
i Hun) would land und be rushed Into
I rhe hatches. Others would miss the
I distance, jump arm drop Into the sea.
i Still others would strike each other In
i the long jump from the high deck of
the Otranto to the swash deck of the
I Mounsey ; some would land on the
deck of the Mounsey with broken
limbs and be washed overboard,
j The reports to Gen. Biddle, while
I was In London, told of the horrors
I of the scene.
Stuck to the Job.
The .Mounsey was veered off several
times by powerful blows from tin 1
i steel sides of the pounding Otranto.
One side near the stern was battered
in like an old tin can. Her engineer
signaled ty Lieut. Craven that the de
stroyer roll Id slant! no more; she would
go down if another effort was made to
run alongside the big ship. But Craven
took the chalices, lie manipulated the
little ship With great skill and got
another bundled American soldier
hoys. In all lie saved about (kin. leav
ing only 357 to perish, und nearly all
fliese were lost In the effort to jump
from the big ship to' the little de
st royer.
Craven landed the (loo In Belfast.
II Is true many of them died there
I'rom I Ip* exjKisure and wounds, hut the
GOO were put ashore from the badly
haltered destroyer. How lie stored
away the dOO In the little lighting craft
Is difficult for naval officers to explain,
hut It was done.
A British admiral in discussing the
Made In Germany
Now Taboo Here
•A'-
sues
.........(nations, hut
American Public Wants No More
Products From Hands of
"Baby Killers."
TRADE MARK IS OFFENSIVE
From Germany Americans Want Noth
ing but Souvenirs of Victory—Ger
man Toys and Other German
Goods Doomed in U. S.
By FREDERIC J. HASKIN,
In Chicago Daily News.
Washington. D. C. F'or the tlrst
time In over .»ii years. American stores
are practically emptied of German
toys. Only a few bisque dolls ne
main, and In most eases these have
! . ...... ' " I'efilUv packed away until some
«Um» «»» it day when American toy buy
ers sim 11 have become reconciled to
the trade mark "Mode In Germany."
Today this trade mark Is not only
unpopular It Is offensive. Americans
will still buy Turkish rug-.. Austrian
musical comedies and Bulgarian color
from Germany thev
want nothing hut souvenirs of victory.
According to one department store buv
er. a woman came into his store not
long ago, in search of tl certain kind
of gloves which, she said, she had been
unable to obtain in two other cities.
Stic was delighted when he ttnal'y
brought out a pair from some old stock
that met with her requirements He
was very much surprised, therefore, to
Hnd bet in an argument with one of
the salesgirls the next day over the
return of her purchase. "1 won't have
1
FROM THE BATTLEFIELD
i
/VF
J;
r.tiss Lillian •'. Nielson of New York
a nurse lu 1 >r. Alexis Carrel's hospi
tal in France, recently returned with
a six-months-old baby, which she says
was picked up on a battlefield when
only nine days old. This is the firat
orphan or foundling the Fretioh gov
ernment lias permitted lo leave the
country. Miss Nielson will take the
baby hack with lier when she returns
lo France.
matter with me In London just after
It occurred said few destroyers could
have stood the strain. He could only
account for her standing the pounding
against the side: of the Otranto by the
fact that her hull was cold riveted
and that she bent without the giving
away of the rivet heads.
I saw her afterward tied up In Bel
fast. She was fearfully bent In, like
a battered tin thing, hut not torn open.
The heads of the rivets held.
It was different with the Kaslimere,
which I afterward saw in Glasgow.
Her how was crushed in. The rivet
heads had given away and the plates
opened up. She had been hot riveted.
English naval officers are giving
study to this rivet question, and are
preparing a report to the admiralty
for future consideration in the build
ing of destroyers.
In t tie meantime all America owes
a ilel.t of gratitude to Lieut. Craven,
lint for his pluck and seamanship not
a man from the Otranto would have
lived to tell the tale.
them," she was saying vehemently
"yon <nn see as plainly ns 1 can that
they ire marked 'maile In Germany.'"
Boy Burns Rocking Horse.
One mother recently espied her
young son standing in n Napoleonic nf
titiide before a blazing bonfire. In the
midst ol which could lie seen the CadY
disappearing head of a white rock
ing horse.
"Why, Nathan," exclaimed his moth
er in a grieved voice, "you used to
he so fend of that rocking horse."
,>M 'm. hut I'm not any more," de
clared lux- soil emphatically. "It's got
elude in Germany' on It."
We hear much about the necessity of
protecting the new American dye In
dustry from German compétition now
that the war Is over, hut few people
1 know that before the war our Importa
lion of German toys was greater than
that of dyes. The figures show that
S',UN loot) worth of toys were Import
ed w here only SX.-loo.iiOt) worth of dyes
were Imported in 1014. the Imports' of
both these lines of goods from Ger
many showed such a startling Increase
that It Is now believed German dye
and toy agents in this country were
aware that war was approaching.
U. S. Toy Business Now Is Vast.
1 he only difference In the histories
of these two Industries is that toys al
ways had been made to a limited ex
tent in tlie 1 tilted States, whereas
dyes—at least coal tar dyes—had not
been made here at all. in miS there
were already 71 toy establishments,
designing and manufacturing Ameri
can toys, and doing an annual business
of $7..YJ 1.485. When the German tovs
stopped coming this Industry unde-
went an enormous expansion. Today
there are MV. American toy firms, do
ing an animal business of $U0..V)0.00rt
T here Is no doubt at pres««nt that the
American toy product Is every hit ns
giH«l ns. If not better, than that nmd)
in Germany. It is a fact that our Amer
ican toymnkers have not yet lenrned
1 " "<'* y' t lenrtteu
to make hisq„ P drills or Christmas tree
haiK hut most |x«opte consider that
the American dolls arc much raor
■aatnral" and abundant Christmas
troc halls may he hnd from Japan.
Inns everybody was prepared for p
peaceful. American toy Christmas this
year, when suddenly a cargo of Ger
man toys arrived in t he port of New
Y ork.
' n eariluj nake eould not have
.-.urod greater consternation In the
Xmerionn toy Industry. Immediately
. ss ,,>oîi "l' the matter with the
r '' fitter invective and the
vice president of one of the firms to
consigned issued
nt : "We have
shipment of Ger
to qs from Ho'.
Though these
ami paid for before
„ !|r property we wilt
GenuAo made goods In our
when
i the toy
s w
t*re
Hie i
idlowing
St;
ItK'fl
refus
cl to «,«,»
cpt
UlO
man
toys with
•h i
uni
land
without
no
tiev
have no
*t«H'k."
s «ere hough
var and are
pSuanAKTElO 1
> rouo HONEY I
YourNoseKn<
All smoking tobaccos use some flavoi
Encyclopaedia Britannica says about the
facture of smoking tobacco, "on the C«
and in America certain 'sauces* are employed
use of the 'sauces* is to improve the fiai
burning qualities of the leaves.**
Tuxedo udes chocolate —the purest, most
some and delicious of all flavorings! Eu
likes chocolate—we all know that chocolate
to anything as a flavoring always makes 1
still more enjoyable. That is why a dash of c
added to the most carefully selected and |
aged hurley tobacco, makesTuxedo more <
" Your Nose Knows**
Try This Test: Rub a little Tu
in the palm of your hand to bring!
aroma. Then smell it deep—its de
fragrance will convince you. Tiyl
with any other tobacco and we will I
stand or fall on your judgment—
"Your Nose Knows?
The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and
n Guaranteed by
^ ÿrui/ Jr***jL*ic<i*<*
^fcsfemCiiiada'si
Horn, of Pleirbr"
OffersftuBeaUh—
Farm Lands
- _ the world .
.— bility of production«
While high -prices for Grain, C
•re sure to remain, price of tandis mm
Land capable of yielding 201
•Is of wheat to the acr* cm
easy tarais at from $18 I
acre-good grazing landet
Many farms paid for from ■ aingle yen»
, cattle, sheep and hogs brings equal succen.
encourages farming and atocK raisii
Land Companies offer unusual inducemM
era. b arma may De stocked by loans«
Webern Canada offers low taxation, good I
ping; free schools, churches and healthful!
reduced railway rat* »
crated literature, etc., apply to Supt. of In*
W. E, BUck. Clifford Block, Gn
Htdilland, Dunn Block« (
Canadian C
Spirited Meeting.
"I nttomh'il a seance last night."
"Any spirits raised?"
"Yes; a reporter present exhibited
• spirit of investigation, and tills
raised a spirit of resentment."—Boston
Evening Transcript.
Doctor Pierce's Plestant Pelleta. Ad». * UCh **
Testing the Theory.
"No man wants to be too hard on
nls children's follies."
"Then. sir. if your daughter map
rles me, will you make some allow
ance for her?"
A Profitable Pen.
"I make a living with my pen
"Writer?"
No. Chicken fancier."
WEAK KIDNEYS MEAN
A WI
creTk'a
creTk'a ** to
more s | ow and dU£ ra u" g "\-„ t Mot, ° n U
** I used to h«>" Not to young
«»me thought Certaî^^a ^ a ", d unwe!_
upon which good h,»-iitK " w j I,y tuactions
•» much depend^are^mpa^red g °Th
•P*'» » generally the bhdd„ I W Wcak
»toltCn r C ;P Ln M P AL
convenience and' p.a ln dnJ'V' ng a the in '
years, it ls « j j le ■dvancing
remedy, and need« nn art î' ®W-time home
imt "p ^t^JT^eV'r l \ 15
lT»e«e ire cas er ant „ ' ,a ,"' s capsules,
than the od'in brnt!« p,ea, " Dt take
five drops P *Tak?'t'hei , n*'*+°rt ° De of
ÏP- with 1 . stV^allow 5 »?
1 hev .oak into *v,„ . allow of water,
the poisons w Meh are'rrf w * n< ^ t ^ lrow off
for* jour time Thet ^n in * r , 0 , u old t""
quickly relieve
Tool or Till
Mary Pert—"Th
have a perfect com
Kntt—"But you can?!
for luck?"
RECIPE FOR
To half p'nt of waterjj
e small box of Barbs *
ox. of glycerine. Any (
up or you can mix it i
tie cost. Full dir
use come in each box «
It will gradually
gray hair, and make iU
will not color the
greasy, end does not i
Self-righteousnes* j
degradation, hut it 1
liness.—ltobert son.
Many a man's ««•
—merely a hollow
those stiffenei
matism, lum
gravel, "bricl
effective rem
bladder, kidn
organs.
GOLD ME
cleanse the k
They frequen
dangerous an
neys. They
often complei
bodily organs
kidneys.
If you an* '
the loins or v,
in the back t
preliminary i
malady which
if taken in ti
Go to your
of GOLD! MF
Money refum
Three sizes, t
original impo
Accept No I

xml | txt