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The Blackfoot optimist. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1907-1918, April 20, 1911, Image 3

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CITY DIRECTORY
POPULATION OF BLACKFOOT.
4000 '
Grove City Cemetery—Owned by
the city, W. Priestly, Sexton.
Commercial Club—L. R. Thomas,
president; C. S. Beebe, secretary.
LODGES
With the total membership, time of
meeting anidi the names of presiding
officers and secretaries:
The Royal Highlanders.—Meet ev
ery second und fourth Wednesday of
each month. P. C. Barker, I. P. ;
Ethel Thompson, secretary.
I. O. O. F.—Every Thursday even
ing. E. M. Hubbell, N. G.; G. PI.
Holbrook, secretary
Rebekah—Second and fourth Wed
nesdays of each month. Ethel Thom
eon, Mrs. B. W. Holbrook.
G. A. R., Geo. H. Thomas Post.—
Meets first Frida<y in each month at
the Armcry. E. E. Thompson, com
mander, W. A. Crawford adjutant.
Grove City Lodge No. 33, A. F.
add A. M.—Meeting (regular) second
P'riday in each month. Percy Jones,
W. M.; W. D. Gagon, Sec'y.
Esther Chapter No-. 14 Order of
the Eastern Star, 80.—First ar.d
third Wednesday. Mrs. Katie Chap
man, W. M.; Percy Jones, Sec'y.
Knights of Pythias—First a>nd third
Tuesdays of each month. Frank
Farmer, Guy Hippie.
M. W. A. 150—First and third
Mondays. Geo. Ezell and S. B. Willis
W. O. W. 86—Second and fourth
Tuesdays. V. Van Gramer, C. C.; G.
W. Glianville, clerk.
Royal Neighbors, 85—Mrs. T. H.
Christy, Mrs. Lena Gaumer.
Wv.'nen of Woodcraft—Second and
fourth ivUndays.
Guardiati* Neighbor—Ethel Thomp
son.
Past Guardian Neighbor—Mrs. M.
E. Larocque.
Adviser—Mrs. Jessie Richardson.
Magician—Mri. V. Van Bramer.
Current Event—President, Mrs. Mat
tie Wilson; Vice-President Mrs. Susie
H. Biethan add Mrs. Mina> B. Rock
wood; Secretary, Mrs. Nan B. Curtis;
Treasurer, Mrs. Inez W. Simmons.
V. I. S.—President, Mrs. J. W.
Chapman; Vicee-President, Mrs. R.
N. West and Mrs. Jessie Woodin;
Treasurer, Mrs. Geo. F. Gagon. Meet
ings are held the first Tuesdays In
each mnoth in the City Hall on Tay- |
lor St., Everybody invited' to at
tend.
CHURCHES
Methodist Church—Mornii.ig service,
11:00; Sunday School, 10:00; Junior
League 4:00; Epworth League, 7:00;
Evening Service, 8:00; Ladies Aid,
Wednesday afternoon. C. A. Edward
pastor.
Baptist Church. Corner University
Ave. und Bridge street. Morning
worship 11:00 a. m. Evening serv
ice 7:30 p. m. Sunday school 10:00
a. in. Prayer meeting Thursday eve
ning 7:30. Ladies' Aid Wednesday
afternoon 2:30. Choir practice Fri
day evening. 8:00. Visitors always
welcome. Parsonage 'phone 228.
W. R. JEWELL, Pastor.
L. D. S. Church, First Ward.—
This church will hold meetings every
Sunday during the following hours:
Sunday school from 10:00 to 11:45 a.
m.; afternoon services frbm 2:00 to
3:00; evening service will commence
at 8:00 p. m. A general invitation
is extended to all. No charges con
nected with our services. Bishop, F.
C. Parkinson; R. H. Clayton, Frank
Hesse, Bishopric of Ward.
Catholic Church—Services are held
at the Catholic church by Fathe
Fuchs of Idaho Falls on the first
second and third Sundays of each
month, services at 12:15 and 10:45.
St. Paul's Episcopal Church—Sun
day morning service at 11 o'clock;
evening service at 7:30 o'clock. These
services will be conducted on the
second and four th Sundays of each
month. Rev. J. E. Williams, Rector.
New Short Line Time Card
est Bound»—
No. 1, 8:05 a. m.
No. 3, 9:34 p. m.
No. 113, 3:15 p. m.
No. 15, 1:08 a. m.
ist Bound—
No. 4. 10:21 a. m.
No. 2, 12:25 a. m.
No. 114, 12:12 p. m.
No. 16, 12:44 a. m.
ackay Branch—
Depart 8:25 a. m.
Arrive 6:25 p. m.
Freight leaves 9:00 a. m. trl-weeklj
lipments must be billed the prev
us day. No passengers carried.
SHIPPERS NOTICE
Freight going north must he bïlled
e day before, freight going south
reived until 9:00 a. m. for ship
e-nt the same day.
EXPRESS OFFICE.
Express office hours 8:00 to 5:30;
eight office hours 7:00 to 5:00. Shi
ents north must be delivered th
ly before.
POSTOFFICE HOURS
Week days from 8:00 a. m. until
:00 p. m.; money orders from 9:00
ntil 5:30; Sunday mails are handled
3 usual; delivery' windows open fret
) to 11 a. m.
03IIIIIIIIIIIIC
3IIIIIIIIIIIICC
I H AWKEYEI
(Optical Co.I
1 IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO I
r% ___ rv
W* I ■ III»— —i
z Dr. 0. M. Drake Dr. A. E. Von Harter ~
3 Modern and Complete. By E
= using the latest and best in- =
= stniineiits with scientific and E
3 practical training we give you E
= the best of service and comfort. E
H Your correction obtained with- E
2 out asking a question. We D
S take every ease for one year E
S and give a written guarantee. E
Sjiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiimiiiiiito
FARMERS APPEAL TO
THE PRESIDENT
Master of National Grange Shows
That Canadian Reciprocity Will Re
duce Value of Farm Lands and
Cause Financial Panic, Through
Genera! Calling in of Loans on
Farms.
Concord, N. H., February 28th, 1911
To Tile President.
Sir:—
I regret that o:ii the occasion of the
recent visit of some forty represen
tatives' of the Grange to Washington,
for the purpose of protesting to the
Senate Committee on Finance against
the enactment of the pendiiiiig Cana
dian Reciprocity Bill, it was not
found convenient to arrange for an
interview with you, at which the ob
jections of the farmers of the country
to this measure could have b en sub
mitted to you personally. 1 wish
now to present for your consideration
a brief statement of the essential
facts on which the agricultural in
terests base their opposition to the
proposed reciprocity arrai ; gement.
The declaration of principles of the
Républicain party, as laid down in the
national platform adopted in 1908,
promised the maintenance of a pro
tective system based on the differ
ence between costs of production in
this country and in foreign countries.
This pledge constituted a contract
between" the Republican party aud
the people, and because of this con
tract, a majority of the farmers joir.r
ed in electing ,a Republican Adminis
tration.
It. was clearly established by facts
submitted to the Senate Committee
on Finance that the cost of producing
the staple farm products which are
to be admitted free of duty under the
pending bill, is materially bight r in
this country than in Canada. Cana
dian farm lands are mucin cheaper
than, ours; wages of Canadian farm
labor are lower; the cost of living is
lower in Canada, owing to that coun
try's lower tariff taxes oil manufac
tured articles; and the farmers of
this country are compelled to pay out
annually immense amounts for fertili
zers,which,owing to their great areas
of virgin soil, are not required by the
Canadian farmers. For all these rea
sons, the verage cost of production
on the farms of the United States is
unquestionably higher thaw on Cana
dian farms. It is therefore, self-evi
dent that adherence to the platform
of the Republican party requires the
imposition of duties on Canadian
farm products equal] to the difference
between the cost of producing them,
and of producing similar articles in
this country.
Having thus shown by applying tii
principle laid down in the Republican
platform the right of the great agr
cultural industry to protection again si
the competition of Canadian farm
products, no further argument should
be necessary to show the injustice
of abolishing the duty on these prod
ucts, while making no reduction in
duties on manufactured, articles that
will lower their cost to the farmers.
I wish, however, to ask your atten
tion. to some results of this legisla
tion, which will not only greatly in
jure the farming industry, but the
commercial, manufacturing, financial,
and transportation interests as well.
It cannot be successfully denied
that the effect of this hill will be Yb
reduce the prices paid to a large pro
portion of our farmers for thoir prod
ucts. This being the case, it follows
that there will be an, immediate fall
in the value of our farm lands in all
sections affected by Canadian com
petition. It is estimated that the
loans on farm lands in this country
amount to $ 3 , 000 , 000 , 000 , and a large
part of these loans have been made
on the supposition that farming was
to continue to be as profitable in the
future as in recent years. The enact
ment of the reciprocity bill would at
once result in a 'general calling in of
hundreds of thousands of loans;farms
would be sold at a sacrifice; the sta
bility of many banking institutions
would be endangered, and a panic
would ensue. Eminent bankers have
recently declared that the conditions
relating to loans on farm lands are
.he chief danger to continued finan
cial stability, as I can see no escape
from the conclusion that the direct
.aid immediate effect of this bill be
rciming a law will be to precipitate a
financial convulsion that will be
worse than the panic of 1907.
Throughout tile New England state*
and otlier eastern and 'northern states
many thousands of farmers have in
vested their small savings in west
ern farm and fruit lands. Reciprocity
will endanger all these investments
and will prevent the development of
tlie great tracts of arable lands witlii
our borders.
The price of wheat has already fal
len from ten to twelve cents per
bushel sic.ce the Reciprocity" Bill was
introduced in Congress, and the
wholesale prices of many other farm
products affected by that measure
have also fallen. If the bill is en
acted, prices will fall still lower,
with, the result that the 35,000,000
people living on farms will have just
so much less money with which to
buy manufactured articles. Will a
decrease in the purchase g power of
the farmer bor.efit the factory worker
in our towns and cities? On the con
trary, will it not injure them by de
priving them of a part of their most
valuable market for their products?
Will not this mean less goods hand
led by our railways, and sold) by our
merchants? Any legislation that, di
minishes the capacity of the farmer
to buy manufactures, hurts all other
business interests.
In view of the magi i-tude of the is
sues involved in the pending Reci
procity arrangement, and its far
reaclii.g effect upon the income of
6,000,000 farmers and the value of
their property, 1 would respectfully
urge that the matter is one calling
for full discussion and careful delib
eratin' ,and that it should hot become
law until it lias been passed upon by
the sober judgment of all the peo
ple of uhe country.
Yours respectfully,
N. J. BACHELDER,
Master National Grange.
Lost—Grey horse, branded C7 on
right stifle. Return to this office and
receive reward. A6-tf
Subscribe for the Optimist.
MOST SURPRISING
ïïféiW
/
4
f
Harold (who had finally summed up
courage to propose)—I've got some
thing to say to you, that—aw—may
suprise you, I think—
Miss Hartless—You do? That cer
tainly does surprise me!
6,000 ACRES STATE LANDS
NEAR BURLEY, IDAHO.
To be sold at public auction at
Burley, Idaho, April 21st. This land
is under the Minidoka government
project. Land selling for twenty five
dollars an acre will require one tenth
payment on date of purchase, bal
ance in eighteen' annual installments.
I/and selling for over twenty five dol
lars per acre will require two tenths
payment on date of purchase and bal
ance in sixteen annual installments.
Reduced rates will be made via the
Oregon Short Line, tickets on sale
from Utah points April 19th amd 20th
and from Idaho points April 20th and
21st. See agents for rates and fur
ther particulars.
D. .W Standrod
And Company
Bankers
Capital $100,000
C. W. Berryman, President
G. A. Robethan, Vice Pres
C. V. Fisher, Cashier
W. F. Berryman, Asst Cash
DIRECTORS:
D. L. EVANS, D. W. STANDROD
J. N. IRELAND, G. A. ROBETHAN
C, V7. BERRYMAN
ELACKFOOT, IDAHO
I PROFESSIONALCARDS f
i
DR. FRANK A. SLOAN
Osteopathic Physician
Office: Boyle Building (with W. A.
Bcakley.) Phone 163.
Reside! ce 356 E Idaho St. Phone 125
BLACKFOOT, .... IDAHO
F. W. KIEFER
Locating and Consulting
Engineer
Slate License, No. 209.
BLACKFOOT IDAHO
DR. W. E. PATRIE
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over the State Bank
MAIN STREET, BLACKFOOT
Office 'Phone, 106. Residence, 75
Res: East Main and Bridge, facing track
DR. II. A. HALSEY,
Physician and Surgeon
Telephone 230
Millick Block, Blackfoot, Idaho.
DR. F. W. MITCHELL
Behley Block
Phone 18
BLACKFOOT
IDAHO
DR. J. B. COOPER,
Phyiscian and Surgeon
No. 312, Near Red Barn
BLACKFOOT, IDAPIO.
HANSBROUGH & G-GON
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Practice in State and Federal Court»
Mill lek Block
BLACKFOOT - - - IDAHO
LORENZO It. THOMAS
Land Attorney
Practice before the U. S. Land Of
fice and Departinnet of Interior.
Register U. S. Land Office from
1897 to 1907. All land office busi
ness given careful attention. Look
fqr the sign near the Land Office,
"13LÂCKFOOT, .....IDAHO
E. M. KENNEDY
Auctioneer
General Sales Agent
BLACKFOOT,.....IDAHO
PELKEY BROTHERS
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Figure with us on anything you in
end to build.
P. O. Box 310. BLACKFOOT, IDA.
W. A. BEAKLEY,
Attorney At Law.
Practices In All Courts.
BLACKFOOT,
IDAHO.
LEO HENISH
Harness, Saddles and repairing
neatly done by
Bridge St.
BLACKFOOT, - - - - . IDAHO
BBRIDGE STREET BARBER SHOP
Hot and Cold Baths,
Good Barber Work,
Tom Reel and Max Smith barbers.
BLACKFOOT,.....IDAHO
KARL S. FACKRELL
Attorney At Law.
Office over State Bank,
BDACKFOOT, - - - IDAHO.
CHIROPRACTOR
DRUGLESS METHOD.
Local examinations ere unnecessary
as they are distaseful. I am pleas
ed to explain my method to tall inter
ested. I use no drugs, mo knife. If
you are sick and have tried every
thing else, and did not receive help,
try Chiropractic and get well.
DR. H. W. Gaumer,
Exchange Building
Office 223. Res. 218 Blk.
GOLDEN SEAL POLISH
Cleans everything. Try it, and use
no other. Free scmple at Biethani's.
M23-4t.
Eggs for Sale.
Indian Runner Ducks, Pekin Ducks,
Toulouse Geese, Golden Wyandotte,
, Buff Orpington Chickens. Bingham
County Nursery Company. M30-tf
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Z
9 Are You 9
• a Farmer •
Look at Our Line of Farm Implements
Oliver Chilled Plows (both gang and
walking) Potato Planters, Binders and
every known 1 ool used on a Farm.
THE
Shelley Mercantile
COMPANY
Barker, Wallen & Co.
F. C. BARKER, Manager
We are now located in our new shop
at 273 N. Main St. where we will be
pleased to have you call and inspect
our stock of Paints,Oils,Varnish,Brushes
and painters supplies. We do all kinds
of decorating and have a force of com
petent workmen. House cleaning time
is near, so if you have anything in our
line place your order with us at once so
that we will be able to do the work
promptly. Your orders will receive our
careful attention.
Call at office or Phone 72
and your order will be taken care of.
Simmons & Allen
■City Transf er 1
PHONES
Simmons' 153 Red
Allei's 78 Black
Office - - 236
ELK COAL SOLD AND DELIVERED
Orders for Sunday Must be in by 9 O'clock A. M.
ANDERSON & HE LI G
General Blacksmiths
and
Horseshoers
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO.
North Mam Street.
»
Best of Work at Reasonable Prices
THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID
IN CASH
For Beef, Veal, Chickens, Hides and Pelts
The People's Exchange OBORN
Store at Snake River Bridge
Phone 71
I
Money to Loan on
Improved Farms
IDAHO IRRIGATED LANDS CO.

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