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The Blackfoot optimist. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1907-1918, April 08, 1915, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091195/1915-04-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Blad foot Optimist
Bn t« red as second clue matter Do
r S, 1447, at the poetofflce at
root. Idaho, under the Act of Con'
of March 1. 1ST»
Published every Thursday
8UB8CRIPTIC
ION RATES
One year
Kiee ' -
W. M. DOOLEY, Manager
year In advance ..............11*0
months .. J..................... 1.04
ee months » ......................M
Republican Ticket.
(Unofficial)
Mayor
E. T. PECK. ,
Clerk
W. S. WRIGHT.
Treasurer
MRS. S. E. SILL.
Police Judge
J. E. GOOD.
Surveyor
Councilmen—Ward 1
R. E, HANSON.
C. C[ CLARK.
Councilmen—Ward 2
NOFEAR DAVIS.
J. W. PELKEY.
Councilmen—Ward 3.
E. M HUBBELL.
C. F. SMITH.
Councilmen—Ward 4
JOH^ H. BOND.
Citizens' Ticket.
((Inofficial)
MRS.
Mayor
L. M. CAPPS.
Clerk
R. S. DeKAY.
Treasurer
L. CHERRY.
Police Judge
J. W. EZELL.
Surveyor
JAS. YOUNG.
Councilmen—Ward 1
A. B. STEPHENS.
FRANK HESSE.
Councilmen—Ward 2
W. F. BERRYMAN.
C. F.j HENDRIE.
Councilmen—Ward 3
AY. C.JTHOMPSON.
B. BOLING.
Counci In îe l i—W a rd 4
V. VAN BRAMER.
H. A, MOWREY.
The citizens of Blackfoot
have met in convention and
SATURDAY
SPECIALS
Shoulder Steak at 12 l-2c per lb.
Rib Boiling Beef at 10c per lb.
Shoulder Pot Roasts at 12 1 -2c perlb.
Fresh cuts from strictly
prime beef
Central Meat Market
L. B. DORE & SON
"The Quality Shop"
J
mass meeting for the pur
pose of nominating two
tickets to be voted on at the
coming city election on April
27th.
These tickets above pub
lished, one a Republican and
the other a Citizens' ticket,
will not be officially an
nounced until next week,
but the character and ability
of their candidates are now
and have for years been too
well known to need newspa
per praise or censure. The
voters will be the judges of
their qualifications and they
should be allowed to exercise
their judgment without bias,
prejudice or misrepresenta
tion.
Both tickets are made up
of representative men and
tax-payers who have the
welfare of the city at heart,
and the selection of those
chosen to preside over its
destiny will be due in no
small degree to their pop
ularity.
LATEST STOCK MARKET.
KANSAS CITY, Stock Yards, April 5
—An advance of 10 to 25 cents on
most kinds of cattle was the result of
the week's trading. Heavy beef steers,
bulls and veal calves were exceptions.
The supply today is 10,000 head, and
the market has the. same tendency it
had last week, strong on everything ex
cept the big steers, which are steady.
Prime heavy steers stop around $8.25,
but choice baby beefs sell up to $8.50,
including odd head of heifers. Good
choice cows sell at $6 to $6.75, a few
up to $7, bulls neglected along with
heavy steers $5 to $6.25, veal ealves,
lower, $9 to $10.25. Receipts today in
cluded 20 cars of northern Colorado
fed western steers, which sold at $7.55
to $7.60, and panhandle steers at $6.80
to $7.75, to both killers and feeder
buyers. One 5 car drove fed on milo
maize, and cottonseed meal, four
months brought $7.50, 1046 lbs. average
sold to killers. In the quarantine di
vision, 19 cars arrived, of which 11
ears were consigned by Furneaux Bros.
Trinity Mills, Texas, which sold at $7.
55 for yearlings weighing 950 lbs., and
$7.20 for steers weighing 1150 pounds,
15 and 20 cents, respectively, above
what steers from same feed lots brought
a, week ago. Spring like weather has
apparently arrived, and proved a help
to the general market today. Packers
claim the amount realized from eattle
by-products is three to five dollars a
head less now than it was March 1st,
the price of hides having dropped 6
cents, a pound in that time. This is one
reason why the cattle market does not
improve more rapidly. Choice stockers
and feeders sell at $7.25 to $7.85, about
the same as at this time last year, and
out of line with fat steers now of course
but justified by popular opinion of
what fat steers will be worth in June
and thereafter. Hogs find a good out
let at prices slightly higher than last
week. Receipts were 10,000 today, and
order buyers paid steady prices for
their hogs, up to $6.85 for tops. Pack
ers' bids were 5c. lower, but they paid
steady prices for their late purchases,
up to $0.80, bulk of sales $6.65, to $6.80,
heavy hogs to $6.80. Order buyers
shipped 18,000 hogs to eastern killers
from here last week, taking fifty per
cent of the receipts after Wednesday
and packers have had comparatively
few hogs since the middle of last week,
hence their anxiety for hogs on the
late market today. Sheep and lambs
are firm, ten loads of lambs bringing
$10.00 today, top price. Of these 8
loads were from Ft. Collins and Tim
nath and 2 loads from the Arkansas
valley. Some ewes brought $7.90, year
lings $9, wethers worth up to $8.25.
Texas wethers sold last week at $7.65,
weighing 98 pounds. Receipts today 8,
500 head, and the supply will be light
here for a month or more ahead.
J. A. Rickart,
Market Correspondent.
K.
K.
K. of P. BOYS INSPIRES BY
ADDRESS OF CHANCELLOR
Something of the old-time vigor and
enthusiasm was manifest among the
local members of the Knights of
Phythias gathered in the rooms in the
K. of P. hall, last Saturday night to
meet Frank P. Hess, grand chancellor,
who had came from his "home at Wal
lace, Idaho, for the regular official
visit.
The visiting official made an interest
ing and instructive address which put
new life into the members and Bhowed
them to what a grand order they be
long. In referring to the Knights of
Pythias as a whole he said:
' 1 The order was founded 51 years
ago in the city of Washington and is
primarily an American institution
and was founded for the purpose of
healing the breaches between the
north and the south, and has since
spread to a few of the other countries
where American colonies are large,
there being lodges in Alaska, China,
Hawaii, the Philippines, the canal zone
and Australia.
"The order has a membership of
over 750,000, being -omprehended in
7647 lodges under the control of 55
grand domains. The order in its
various branches has cash on hand of
over $3,000,000. The 'assets of the
grand lodges, including cash on hand,
(real and personal property) amounts
to practically the same amount, while
the subordinate lodges have assets of
upwards of $16,500,000. The order pays
out yearly for the relief of its members
and their families over $2,000,000.''
The grand chancellor is advocating
the starting of a fund, the interest
from which would be used for pension
ing aged and indigent members and the
orphans of member». Many of the
grand domains have established homes
for this purpose, but Mr. Hess believes
that more assistance can be given by
applying the relief directly to those
needing it, leaving them in a home
where tlioir life must be made to eon
form to rules and regulations, and
where most of the fund must be used to
build and maintain tne home.
Attention was called to recent changes
in the supreme law and especially to the
official lapel button which has been
copyrighted by the supreme lodge and
can be obtained only through lodge
channels. The button is a small tri
angle with three smaller triangles in
the lodge colors supetimposed there >n
and a central triaigie containing the
supreme lodge seal.
Referring to the European war Mr.
Hess stated that he believed that if
war was ever abolished, if the roar
of guns and the tramp of marching
armies were no longer heard in the
land, it would be because of the teach
ings of the Order of £he Knights of
Pythias, or of some similar organization
and that not until the people of the
world knew and understood the mean
ing of fraternalism, which is the true
brotherhood of man, and applies to na
tions as well as individuals, would we
ever see the end of this cruel and use
less waste of life.
APPOINT NEW ROAD OVERSEER.
Last Saturday County Commissioners
Bond and Fugate visited Tabor op offi
cial business which consisted of view
ing the roads and appointing a road
overseer for that recently created road
district. After making investigations
and inquiries as to the best man avail
able for the position they choose C. P.
Pawling, a selection which seems satis
factory to the people of that district.
REVOLVERS.
A revolver is a nickle-plated substi
tute for bravery, which has practically
driven the original article out of the
market.
The revolver gives a puny man with
a 5-8 inch brain and the pluck of a
grasshopper a 100-yard reach and makes
him more deadly than a Sioux Indian
There was a time when tiiis country
had no dangerous animals, except the
bears and wolves, and life was safe,
except on the frontiers, but now vast
hordes of 16-year old boys who use
their skulls for a dime novel bookcase,
roam the streets with cigarettes in
their face and portable cannon in their
hip pockets, producing obituaries with
the skill and enthusiasm of a cholera
microbe, while it is at all times possible
to meet a persona! enemy who has been
chasing you for a week, and who is
reluctantly compelled to defend himself
when he eatehes you by filling you so
full of lead that your remains will re
quire eight pall-bears. Revolvers are
now so generally used in debate, in do
mestic quarrels and repartee of all sorts
that 8,000 Americans die of them each
year, it is said.—Mitchell, S. I). Gazette
Chamberlain 's Cough Remedy.
From a small beginning the sale and
j use of this remedy has extended to all
parts of the United States and to many
foreign countries. When you have need
of such a medicine give Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy a trial and you will un
derstand why it has become se popular
for coughs, colds and croup. Obtainable
everywhere. For sale by all dealers.
BUY YOUR
Formaldehyde,
Blue Vitrol,
Soluble Sulphur Compound,
Arsenate of Lead,
at RIGHT PRICES of
Powers' Pharmacy
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO
NO CRIME TO HILL BABBITS
A complaint against H. M. Ham
mer was filed on Monday in Justice
Willard White's office -by Deputy
Game Warden Taylor for violation
of the game laws by hunting without
license. The evidence given by
Warden Taylor for the state waa the
only testimony introduced on the
triai and was not disputed. It showed
that the defendant had been out
hunting jack rabbits and had killed
one. The decision was based upon
the legal construction of that pro
vision of the law which forbids
"hunting for any game whatever"
without a license.
Attorney J. Nat Hudson who ap
peared for the defendant contended
that the provisions of the law should
not be construed to prevent the kill
ing of predatory animals without a
license, and cited the cases of large
parties of persons joining in a rabbit
drive and that no one thought of re
quiring hunting licenses for those en
gaged in it. That the law was evi
dently not intended to require a
license for hunting any other game
animals except those mentioned in
the act.
Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Par
rish, who appeared for the state, was
inclined to take the same view inas
much as the law authorized county
commissioners to levy a bounty tax,
if they deemed best, for the extermina
tion of predatory animals mentioning
rabbits among others.
Judge White after considering the
matter and with the state's consent
dismissed the complaint and discharged
the defendant.—Statesman.
PROTE8T AGAINST QUARANTINE.
Governor Alexander has officially
protested to Governor J. B. Kendrick
of ^Wyoming against the placing of
strict quarantine against Idaho live
stock, refusing to permit their feeding
and watoring at Wyoming points while
in transit to eastern markets, claiming
such a quarantine is violation of the
agreement reached by western states at
the recent SUn Francisco' conference.
Announcement
I desire to announce to the
general public, that I have pur
chased the CLUB CAFE, and will
run the business at the same
stand on Pacific street. Your
business will be appreciated.
Everything clean and sanitary.
Yours for good service.
G. M. Locey
PROPRIETOR CLUB CAPE.
Clothcraft Clothes
For Men
and Young Men
Styles change, but
pure wool and good
tailoring are al
ways the founda
tion of values.
*1010*20 £s&
R0WLES-MACK CO.
The Clothcraft Store
SALT LAKE, April 6—The first pub
lic financial statement ever issued by
the Mormon church was presented in
the tabernacle Sunday before the an
nual conference.
The report shows that the church
collected $1,887,920 from tithes in
1914, of which $730,960 was expended
on church buildings, $330,984 to
maintain the church schools, $364,508
to maintain the Mormon temples,
$227,900 for missionary work, $99,
293 to maintain church offices, $136,
727 to complete and maintain the L.
D. S. hospital in Salt Lake, and $116,
238 to the poor.
The report also shows that the Mor
mon relief societies and the local
ehurch organizations gave $150,290 ad
ditional for the relief of the poor, and
that the European war relief fund of
PUBLISH FINANCIAL STATEMENT
EXTRA
SPECIAL
Every item well worth your while to examine.
You will be sure to find by comparison with other
merchandise that we are giving better goods at less
money, than you will find anywhere else. This is
strong talk, but on account of special purchases in
these particular articles, we know we are not giving
you any hot air.
Men's Sample Suits and odd lot Suits, latest cuts
and cloths, very highest class tailoring—$20.00
to $30.00 Suits for only ............................ $15.00
Boys' Suits, regular $4.50 Suits, for.................... $2.50
Boys' Suits, regular $5.50 to $6.00, for................ $4.00
Boys' Suits, regular $9.00 to $12.00, for............ $6.00
Ladies ' Shoes, 48 pair, .Patent, Button A fine Shoe
worth $3.75, selling for.................................. $2.76
MILLINERY
30 Hats for............................................................... $5.40
Fisk's Pattern Hats, you cannot duplicate them
for less than $10 and up to $18.
30 Hats, Fisk's trimmed Hats, $6 to $8 for ........$4.50
24 Hats, Fisk's trimmed Hats, $4.50 to $6, for ..$3.60
We surly can save you money now on your Spring
Hat.
A special value in Bath Towels, heavy, large 35c pair
A special value in Bleached Muslin, 10c kind.......... 8c
1000 yards Apron Checks, 8c kind, for .................. 6c
400 yards 36-inch Dress Gingham, 15c kind for ...10c
These will not be duplicated again soon — come
while they last.
=AT:
BIETHAN'S
Public Sale
Having sold my farm I will sell all of my stork and implements at public
auction at my farm 5 miles south west of Blackfoot and 3-4 mile east of the
school house between the river, on
Wednesday, April 14
Beginning at 11 o'clock a. m. Rain or Shine.
12 Head of Horses 12
1 black mare, 5 years old, in foal, weight 1700; 1 black mare, 5 years old,
infoal, weight 1600; 1 iron gray mare, 6 years old, in foal, weight 1500; 2 com
ing 2 years old filleys, weight 1250; 1 good yearling horse colt; 4 other good
horses and mares.
10 Head of Cattle 10
6 extra good milch cows, 2 yearling heifers, 2 months old Durham bull, 1
heifer calf.
HOGS — 3 Poland China sows and pigs, I due to farrow soon; 1 Poland
China boar, 18 months old.
SEED POTATOES—Select Idaho Rurals, sold in lots to suit.
FARMING MACHINERY—2 sets good work harness, 1 Dowden potato dig
ger, 1 potato sorter, potato planter, 1 John Deere sulkey plow, 1 two-sectiou
steel harrow, 1 disc harrow, 1 cultivator, 1 Fresno scraper, 1 nearly new
Bain wagon, good surry and driving harness, grind stone and small tools too
numerous to mention.
FREE LUNCH AT NOON
TERMS—All sums of $10 and under, cash; over that amount a credit of
nino months will be given on approved notes bearing 10 per cent interest- five
per cent off for cash.
C. C CLAWSON, Owner
N. E. MONTGOMERY, Auctioneer
C. V. FISHER, Clerk.
the ehurch amounted to $33,000, which
has been sent abroad to be dispersed
through the ehurch 's representative*
The expenses of the general officers of
the church are not paid from tithing,
the roprt says, but from revenues de
rived from the church's investments.
The report shows a net increase in the
membership of the church of 129,493
for the period from 1901 to 1914, a
birth rate of 39.5 per thousand, a death
rate of 8.3 per thousand, a marriage
rate of 17 per thousand in 1914.
The report, which embraces the op
erations of the church throughout the
world, shows that 1,136 men and 115
women are engaged in Mormon mis
sionary work, that 14,717 Mormon
children were born in 1914, that 73
per cent of the families in the church
own their own homes, and that 319,
000 members of the church were born
in the United States. The total mem
bership is not given.

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