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The Blackfoot optimist. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1907-1918, June 15, 1916, Image 2

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THE BINES SISTERS.
If you want to be entertained to a de
g ree that you have rarely been enter
tained before; if you want to feel the
pure joy of just being alive, do not fail
to blue pencil your date book for the
Riner Sisters, who furnish one of tbo
most satisfying programs of the chau j
tauqna. They come to qs with the un- j
equivocal indorsement of ehautauqua
and lyeeum bureaus all over the coun
try. Everybody kjy s '/They just walk
out and mhke good'." Kalaideoscopie
in variety of expression, they register
in the language of the movies the acme
of droll mimicry, ironical gravity, pen
sive sadness, mirth - 'provoking panto-'
mime, and at times the.wholesome touch
of a light sweet sèrioùiinesa; They are
inimitable fun-makers of strictly Class
A distinction. Handsome, refined, tal
ented, loving their work ns much as the
public, which' in almost V*much t^»o
much," they \veave themselves njto tho j
hearts of any audience 111 a manner .
wholly captivating. They never fail to
"draw aiid * go big. Although it
is not uncommon for an audience to al- [
most break up a Riner program with
laughter, there is yet the lmppy balance
of an unconscious dignity that will meet
with the approval of the oldest inhabit- j
ant. A Riner repertoire—-a large meas
lire of which is original—'runs the
gamut of solos,' dllets, individual and
combined inipcrsonntioiis, piano solot
by Miss Irene Huminel, pianist accom
panist, with an individual charm all her
own, rending of play or story, mono
logues, short, straight and dialect read
ings, a program of its kind not to be
excelled anywhere.
LIBEL NOT SUSTAINED.
The libel suit brought against the Sib
ver City Avalanche by a county com
missioner of Owyhee county resulted in
a verdict for the defendant. Intelli
gent juries do not support attempts to
throttle the press. Criticism of publie
officers, when honestly Inspired, is a
safeguard of' good government. Courts,
juries and public opinion will not sus
tain attempts to beat down this safe
guard.—Caldwell Tribune.
Subscribe for The Optimist.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
H. W. OAUMBX
Doctor of Chiropractic
Acute sad Chronic Diseases
OSes in Andsroon Block
Phono 883. Residence 218
BLACKFOOT IDAHO.
W. A. BEASLEY
Attorney and Counselor at Law
Practice in State and
Federal Courts.
Markus Rlenkle Building
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO.
1
!
HARNESS OILING
NOW 18 THE TIME TO HATE
YOUR HARNESS OILED AND
REPAIRED
FULL LINE OF__
Home Made Harness
That are Strictly Guaranteed.
SHOE REPAIRING.
Blaekfoot
Harness Shop
!
LEO HENISH, PROPRIETOR.
NO. 40 WEST BRIDGE STREET
t
I
MM
MO
D. A. JENKENS I
i Contractor and Builder I
BRICK WORK a SPECIALTY. 2
BLACKBOOT, IDAHO.
OH
MM
MM
M»l
MO
MM
MM
►4M
MB
IDLE HOUR POOL HALL
W. L. PARKER, PROPRIETOR
A pleasant and refreshing resort
where von can get a good smoke
and a cool drink. N. Main Street.
GIVE IT A CALL.
»M
MM
MM
MO
»••4
j M. BOYLE, REAL ESTATE
Anything you want to buy or sell.
Res. Phone 322. 1'. U. Box -+1-.
I.ost River land to sell or ex
change for Blaekfoot and sur
rounding property. Office Phone
391. Over Pearson's grocery
store, Room 3. Biackfot, Ida.
•M
DM
O. S. L. Watch Inspector
CHICHESTER S PILLS
TIIK DIAMOND HU A NO. A
1*11 1« ill I Jet! ani Gold metallic^/'/
!»)(«, scaled Dili* Lluij Tiil.ixm. \ X
Take ■« other. It»*y of your "
l>nigft«t. Ask for ('IIl-4'i!i:H«TKK B
DIAMOND llllAND 1*1 LI.*, for 8*
wears known as Be-rt. Safest, A'»ays Rrhalilr
SOLD BY DRUQtilSTS CYERVWHtRf
EMINENT JURIST COMING.
Judge R. M. Wan a maker, of the su
preme eourt of Ohio., who will speak
at the ehautauqua in Blaekfoot, brings
a message of even greater individual
interest and ini|>ortanee than that of
preparedness—li constructive treatment
j of the vital problems of our federal,
j state, district and local courts. No
man in America today is so ably
equipped, by reason of actual partici
panee, and deinoustratiou of contended
principles, to point out the glaring
weaknesses of our system of jurispru
deuce, and at the same time offer a
workable remedial solution to'the prob
leins.
"By tlieir fruits ve shall know
thcn ,/-> judge Wanamaker comes to
llot as a ra( | icat or vehement, dili
but With- a personal record, in the
,, ourts of tl „. groat State of Ohio, which
vilrdiciites his contention that it is not
j olï | v ri&rlit but possible, to. exercise the
. sa , a e thoroughness and dispateh in the
conduct of court, procedure that
em pl ove ,i in the various professions,
[ i^titutimw and industries of the c,aim -
j rv As district attorney, .as judge of
,. olu j ,,f ,-miiiiioii. pleas, as judge of
thp BU ., reln e court of his State, Judge
j v v«n«maker struck a new note in the
annals of jurisprudence in this country.
He proved not only to the people of
Ohio, but to ninny .outside thousands
who were eager to familiarize them
selves upon the subject, that after all,
the dispensation of equal justice guar
anteed to every one under the law is a
thing of simple and direct method.
Judge Wanamaker has the uncon
scious poise, dignity and presence of
the man who knows—who takes stock
only in results. He is a very pleasing
speaker, fluent, carefully avoiding the
obscure phrases of lqgal parlance—•
using ouly the language familiar to all.
He appeals to all classes, of every de
gree and standing, because what he has
to say is meant for everyone. It is this
quality, as much as anything else, that
has endeared him to the many thou
sands who have heard him in the east.
To hear Judge Wanamaker is to be in
structed and entertained by one of the
foremost constructive men of our time.
KEEP A FLOCK Or SHEEP.
Western farmers are overlooking a
good source of revenue by not keep
ing a small flock of sheep. The grow
ing of wool and the raising of sheep
in this country are on the deeline. We
produce a large surplus of cotton ami
cereals but are forced to go into for
eign markets for SO per rent of our
wool.
Sheep are good animals to have on a
farm, and their value should not bu
overlooked. A Dock of twenty or thir
ty could be easily kept on practically
every farm with very little additional
expense, since they subsist largely upon
weeds, shattered grain, etc., that would
otherwise be wasted.
With wool selling at JO cents a pound
a flock of twenty sheep would bring an
1 nually $60 to $80 from that source, be
sides raising twenty-five to thirty
! lambs and providing the table with
fresh mutton.
Forethought.
People are learning that a little fore
thought often saves them a big ex
pense. Here is an instance. E. W.
Archer, Caldwell, Ohio, writes: "I do
not believo that our family has been
without Chamberlain '■ Colic, Cholera
and Diarrhoea Remedy since we com
menced keeping house years ago. When
we go on an extended visit we take it
with us." Obtainable everywhere.
LADIES
Expert facial and scalp treatments,
shampooing an.; manicuring—any hour
by appointment. Helen Quinlan, 495
IN. 3tout Ave., phone 184.—Adv.
!
Corns Gome Off
Like Banan a Pool
Wonderful, Simple "Get*-It" Never
Fails to Remove Any Corn Easily.
"Wouldn't it jar you? Here I've
been going along for years.-with one
desperate corn after another, trying
to get rid of them with salves that
to
Hesitate! IT*« Rare "fiets-It" for Those
Corns and Save Your Life and Your Toes!
eat off the toes, tapes that stick to
the stocking, bandages and plasters
that make a package of the toes, try
ing blood-bringing razors and scis
Bors. Then I tried 'Gets-It* just once
and you ought to have seen that corn
come off—just like a banana peel." It's
simple, wonderful. It's the new way,
painless, applied in two seconds, nev
er hurts healthy flesh or irritates.
Nothing to press on the corn. Never
fails. Quit the old ways for once any
way and try —Geta-It" tonight. For
corns, calluses, warts and bunions.
"Gets-lt" is sold everywhere, 25c a
bottle, or sent direct by E. Lawrence
& Co., Chicago, 111.
Sold in Blaekfoot and recommended
as the world's best corn remedy by
Palace Drug Store.
Let Us Save
You Money!!
Why throw your old tires and tubes
away when they have advanced from
10 to 25 per cent. Bring them to us
and get an estimate on guaranteed re
pairs, for don't you know that we have
the best equipped tire plant in Idaho
Watson's Garage.
Adv. 1-27 tf.
Chicago, June 10.—Charles Evans
Hughes, of New York, was nominated
presidential candidate by the Republi
can convention on the third ballot.
Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indians,
was nominated vice president on the
lirst ballot.
Hughes received 9+9Vi, and his nom- .
ination was declared unanimous; !
Roosevelt, 18*/i; Dupont, 5; Weeks, 3,
krill Lodge 7.
Lenders say both will accept the nom
inations. . . ,
Reading Of the 'dtOoaevèït message
urging Lodge's nomination was closely
followed. The message gave Lodge's
record iind attitude on public ques
tions for several years, and declared
he hud been thinking 'of the question
for mouths and pointed out the neces
sitv for united action in defeating the
Democrats.
Sino
report
lion
available or so able to command, the
support of all factions.
Senator Lodge, supporting Hughes'
nomination, spoke in the - wurmest
terms, declaring' Hughes "thOWnighly
a man, distinguished and upright.''
Arizona gave Hughes 5 and Röösc
veil 1; Colorado, Hughes 9, Roosevelt 3.
A- M. Stevens, of Colorado, moved
Roosevelt's name be withdrawn,' ami
Colorado changed its vote solid for
Hughes. Montana, 7 Hughes, 1 Roose
velt. Nevada was solid for- Hughes.
Utah gave Hughes 7 and Roosevelt 1.
Wyoming was all for Hughes. The
necessary number was secured when
New Jersey was reached.
The official count gave Fairbanks
863, Burkett 108, others scattered. A
great demonstration started when tkn
results were announced. The eonveu -
tion then adjourned.
THE BALLOTS.
First.
Hughes ............................................253 Vs
Weeks .............................................105
Root ................ ..................................I0.'f
Cummins .......................................... 84
Burton ............................................. 76V4
Fairbanks .....................................— 74
Sherman ............................................ 86V4
Roosevelt ............................................ 65
Knox ..........•...................................... 36
Ford .................................................... 32
Brumbaugh ..................................... 29
La Follette ........................................ 25
Taft .................................................... 14
Dupont .—............................-........... 12
Willis ............................... 4
Borah .................................................. 2
McCall . ............................................ 1
Not voting, 2%.
Second.
Hughes ..............................................328 Va
Root .................................................... »«**
Fairbanks ........... 88*4
Cummins ........................................... 85
Roosevelt ......................................... j 81....
Weeks ................................................ 79
Burton .........................~..................... 7614
Sherman .............................................. 65
Knox .........-....................................... 36
La Follette ........................................ 25
I>upout .............................................. 13
Wanamaker ........................... 5
McCall ............... 1
Willis ................................................. 1
Harding .............................................. 1
Not voting, 2.
Third.
Hughes ................................................94014 !
Roosevelt ...................................
Lodge .................................. 7
Dupont ..................................-.........— !>
La Follette ................ 3
Weeks .....................................~+....... 3
Absent ................................... 1
The Idaho delegation voted on the
first ballot us follows: For Roosevelt,
Senator Borah, E. R. Dewey, 8. A. Kast
en and John W. Hart. For Hughes,
Senator Brady, Janies F. Ailsbie, Frank
W. Gooding and E. R. Whitla- On the
second ballot the votes for Roosevelt
were Borah, Hart and Dewey.
Resigns From Court.
Washington, June 10. — Justice,
Hughes declared when informed of bis
nomination that he had nothing to say
then, but lie would issue a statement
later today. He had been busy work
ing on a court decision for Monday,
which will probably be his last day as
justice of the supreme court.
Justice Hughes sent a telegram to
Harding, accepting the Republican nom
ination. He segt his resignation as as
sociate justice of the supreme court,
to I'resilient Wilson by messenger.
Harding sent congratulations to Justice
Hughes.
i
'
ls / *
Hughes' Pedigree.
Charles Evans Hughes was born in
Glens Ferry, New York, April 11, 1862,
making -him four years younger than
ex-President Roosevelt, and six years
younger than. President Wilson.
His father was a Baptist minister,
and his mother was a devoted woman
who shaped his early education with the
idea of preparing him for the ministry,
lie was graduated from Brown Univer
sity in 1881, one of the five Phi Bella
Kappa honor men in his year. Finally
he attended the Columbia University
law school, holding the prize fellowship
from 1881 to 1887.
The public first heard of Mr. Hughes
in 1905 and 1906. It was in those years
that he served, first es counsel of the
Stevens legislative commission investi
gating the gas companies of New York,
and then as counsel for the Armstrong
legislative committee for the iuvesti
:kc:
K C Baking Powder is guaranteed
absolutely pure and wholesome.
There is no Rochelle salts, no
harmful residue left in the food
that is leavened with K. C.
Even the most delicate can eat hot
breads raised with K. C without distress.
Try KC Baking Powder breads if yeast
raised bread does not agree with you.
:kc:
gation of insurance business iu New
York. In the insurance investigation
he unearthed nation wide scandals and
the whole country followed the dramat
ic story which he revealed.
In 1905 Mr. Hughes was nominated
for mayor of New York by the Kepub
. lican convention, but declined the nom
! inntion. The following year, he was
elected governor of Now York, and in
1908 was re-elected. He was appoint
ed justice of the United States supreme
court iu May, 1910, and resigned , the
g'ôvornorship' to -go to - thé siipreriie
bench.
THE OOMUS PLAYERS.
To meet the evpr growing Aeiimnd fat
high-class drama -as a feature of Chau
tauqua, the management were fortun
ate enough to secure the Cornus Play
dramatic artists
formant to the best
aids. -
The members of the company are
well known in dramatic circles through
out • the. country—having won -distinc
tion in the popular ami Shakespearian
roles: Archibald Reddie, who is the
heavy-character man of the troupe, has
•distinguished himself in- many western
productions -of standard plays, • Miss
Janet Young, kuowii to footlight fans
ns the Sweetheart of the Northwest.,
is the leading lady. Roswell Dosch is
a well traiued young actor, having re
ceived his dramatie education in the
exacting schools of Europe. Ralph
Asli, who is cast opposite Miss Young,
has the physique of the matinee idol,
happily combined with rare interpretive
ability
The Cornus Players are to give "Car
son of the North Woods," a Canadian
classic of frontier life around Quebec
This is a play of strong moral appeal.
As a prelude to the foregoing, the Co
rnus Players give a favorite selection
from Shakespeare. *
!
Shakespeare.
DAY OF CHEAP MEATS IS
GONE FOREVER
"The day of cheap meats is passed.
Production is not keeping up with the
increase in population and the devasta
tion caused by the European war means
that in the future—for a long time to
come, at least—America will be called
upon to furnish a greater supply of
meat to the world than in the past, with
a constantly increasing price to the eon
sumer. ' '
The above is the expressed opinion of
one of the greatest packers of the
United 8tates, who is familiar with th«
moat industry of the country'. The peo
ple of the United States are the great
est meat eaters of the world as a na
tion; are the best fed and beet cared
for people. Immigrants from some of
the southern European countries that
had meat on the family table once g
week or less in their former homes,
become meat eaters in America for the
reason that they are better paid and
meat has been cheaper.
Meat will never—or not for a long
time—be beyond the reach of the aver
age American family, and there is little
danger of them being forced to eut
their allowance to one time a week,
but it may be necessary in a number
of cases to cut the family meat bill
from three times a day to once a day,
and for the housewife of America to
i learn to serve the less desirable and
' cheaper cuts of beef.
In France and Germany, where cook
ing is more of an art than in the- United
States, and where the art is learned
from necessity, the cheaper parts of the
beef are served in a most palatable way
by the proper cooking method» and
season. It is easier to make a threw
inch thick tenderloin steak taste good
than a piece of "chuck-steak," brat
the latter has just as much nutrition in
it and can be made to taste almost a»
good, though of a different flavor.
The cutting down of the range in the
United States, the constant increase in
population and the falling off in produc
tion are accountable for the to-be-ex
per ted high prices.
The people of the United States will
have to learn to substitute other foods;
for meats, as the people of England,
Russia and Norway do today. The live
stock industry is to become from all in
dications one of the liest paying
branches of American agriculture^
Mrs Myrtle Jones, of the Brown
Hart Company, spent Sunday in Lav»
Hot Springs.
UNSHAKEN TESTIMONY.
Time is the test of truth. And
Doan's Kidney Pills have stood the
test in Blaekfoot. No Blaekfoot resi
dent who suffers backache, or annoying
urinary ills can remain unconvinced by
this twice-told testimony.
Mrs. J. L. Wilson, R. F. D. No. 2,
Blaekfoot, says: "I had attacks of
kidney complaint for four years. This
trouble came on suddenly, the first
symptom being pains across the small
of uiy back that obliged me to take to
my bed for three or four days. I tried
various medicines, but without getting
relief, until I took Doan's Kidney Pills.
They proved very effective."
Over two years later Mrs. Wilson
said: "I still consider Doan's Kid
nov Vills a first-class kidney medicine. "
Price 50c at all dealers. Don't sim
ply ask for a kidney remedy—get
Doan 's Kidney Pills—the same that
Mrs. Wilson has twice publicly recom
mended. Foster-Milburn Co., Props.,
Buffalo, N. Y.—Adv.
CARBON
Let me burn the Carbon out of that motor with oxygen, better and
cheaper than by hand- No taking down. Just drive up In front. Done
in a jiffy.
Remember my motto for the welding department—bring me what the
other fellow says "can't bo done." *."•
My vulcanising needs no advertising. My work advertises Itself.
Welding and Vulcanizing
ROY FÜLLENWÏDÈR
NORTH MAIN STREET.
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO
►WYY
%
The Reward
of Careful
Attention
* There's no accident about
successful cattle raising.
Good buildings are a first
m essential.
A well-planned cattle barn soon pays for itself. You
can almost see the difference in the"condition of your
stock. It is one more safe-guard against loss from disease.
In planning your cattle barn, you naturally have prob
lems of your own to take into consideration. The size,
location, ami interior arrangement must be adapted to
your needs.
Instead of putting up a separate building you might
find it better to build an addition to your present barn
equipment. Iu any event you will consider the con
venience to yourself and your hired help of having a
building of ample size.
Talk it over with us. We want to help you decide
upon the one best building for your purpose.
GEM STATE LUMBER CO.
4-1 s & o c f a t o 3
A .BARBETTE. MANAGER
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO
Miss Mildred Parker departed for
Twin Falls Saturday, after a three
weeks' visit in Blaekfoot, the guest of
Miss Lucile Davis.
TYPHOID
ilMlIrsx. bar
I mill nr» t» !imn»m»lnl
Un sinon nloculoo* sfW
mr. ssd kamlMMS. of AttityphoU Vaodaatto».
Ba sacclaatsd ROW hr rout physician, yen ant
your family. It U anna Wal than hauaa I n aa ra a r «.
ilk your physician, t in t s »». ■ aaad tor Hasp
yon ha* Typhoid!" Utliac af Typhol« Vaeclaa,
awits ftoas aaa. aa« «sa g nr trsas Typ h oi* Castisss.
THE OJÎTT» LAMttATWY, KMELCY. CAL
ra s a s m i « na.au a aaaaaa aaaa a a. a aas. usaaas
Use This Clear Soap
For a Clearer Skin
JAP ROSE
TY. "Sunday Mormi. s Bath"
SOAP
is wonderfully pure. The
lather absorbs that "dirty"
feeling ^nd instills a delight
ful freshness.
Unexcelled for Shampoo, Bath
and General Toilet Use.
Beat For Your Oily Skin
For Free Sample Write lame« S. Kirk & Co.,
Dept. 353, Chicago, U. S. A.
Wall Paper,
Rugs and
Furniture.
We
SAVE YOU
Money. ~
BIETHAN'S
Subscribe for The Optimist.
Many in Blaekfoot
Try Simple Mixture
Many Blaekfoot people are am-prised
at the- QUICK aetion of simple buck
thorn bark, glycerine, etc., *s mixed in
Adler-i-ltft. This simple remedy acts
on BOTH upper and lower bowel, re
moving suck surprising foul matter t hat
ONE SPOONFUL relieve« almost AN Y
CASE of constipation, sour stomach or
gas. A few doses often relieve or pro
vent appendicitis. A short treatment
helps chronic- stomach trouble- The IN
STANT, easy awtiou of Adler-i-ka is
astonishing. Kchr. Thoreson, druggist.
—Adv.
Hair Switches
to match your hair. A regular
$4.50 value for $1.45, for a short
time only. Come and see for
yourself.
Biethan's
HOGS
WANTED
An unlimited number of
feeders for which the
highest cash prices will
be paid at
COZY NOOK FARM
E. J. Scofield, Prop.

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