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The Blackfoot optimist. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1907-1918, December 21, 1916, Image 2

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iWerrp Ctjrtötmaö!
The Spirit of Christmas Is making itself felt ln
this Christian land of ours.
Men, women and children are giving
thought to plans for making others happy on
Christmas Day.
Some will make costly gifts; some will give
little remembrances, Inexpensive, but rich In
genuine Good Will; some will send written
messages of loving thoughts; and many, very
many will send the spoken word over the
Telephone lines.
While homes resound with Christmas merri
ment and the very atmosphere is charged
with Good Will to Men, the Telephone Operator
will be at her lonely post, connecting the lines
that will carry glad voices to distant friends.
Her duty Is to serve, and right gladly does
she perform her tasks, even while others are
making festive holiday.
And you who use the Telephone on Christ
mas Day will detect In the operator's cheery
"Number please," the notes of the "Merry
Christmas" which we wish for all our patrons.
-The
Mountain States Telephone
and Teleèraph Company
9
%
&
mi
~a>
In the Probate Court of Bingham Coun
ty, State of Idaho.
In the Matter of the estate of'
Selina Stout, deceased. No. 423.
Notice is hereby given, by the un
dersigned, administrator of the estate
of Selina Stout, deceased, to the credi
tors of and all persons having claims
against said deceased, to exhibit such
claims, with the necessary vouchers,
within ten months after the first pub
lication of this notice to the adminis
WATSON'S GARAGE
BLACKFOOT'S OLDEST AND LARGEST GAR
AGE. BETTER SERVICE FOR LESS MONEY.
* WE SELL NO CARS, BUT REPAIR
ALL MAKES, AND CAN FURNISH
YOU WITH REPAIRS AND PARTS
FOB ANY MAKE OF CAR.
EXPERT TIRE AND TUBE REPAIRING.
M. B. WATSON, BLACKFOOT, IDAHO.
How Santa Claus Solved His Problem
Santa Claus sat dozing
By his fire the other night,
A wondering what to do
In his extr'ordinary plight.
A pilo of letters at his side
The cause of his dismay,
For each one asked for something
"Up-to-date in every way."
Old Santa fell asleep,
But he awakened with a start;
He knew NOW what to scatter
And he quickly di<( his part.
Itis pack was filled on Christmas Eve
With—what do you suppose!
Why, toasters, porcolaters,
And a cleaner of one's clothes.
There were curlers for the hair,
And a wooly warming pad,
And many other useful
Things ELECTRIC, Santa had;
And ev'ery gift brot happiness,
Contentment and delight,
So make your gifts ELECTRICAL
And then you'll be all right.
Idaho Power Company
trator at the office of Ralph W. Adair,
attorney at law, in the court house, at
Blackfoot, Bingham county, Idaho,
which said office the undersigned se
lects as his place of business in all
matters connected with said estate of
Solina Stout.
W. H. CURTIS,
Administrator of the ost
tate of Selina Stout.
Dated and first publication Decem
ber 21, 1916. Last publication Jan
uary 18, 1917.
RETURNING OF OUR SOLDIERS.
The Idaho troops left Nogales, Ari
zona, last Monday, the 18th, according
to present advices, and operating on
the regular schedule, should reach Boise
on the afternoon of December 22. This
doubtless means that the returning
boys will go through Pocatello toujght,
Thursday, if the schedule is maintained.
It is reasonable to assume, however,
that there will be sufficient delay to
bring the boys into Pocatello during
the morning of the 22nd.
A letter to the tribune from D. F.
Spencer, general passenger agent of
the Short Line, states that the ad
vices given out by the company and
others a week ago are changed by
reason of the fact that the Idaho boys
will be sent home instead of being
mustered out at Salt Lake, Idaho fac
tors having become active in bring
ing pressure to bear at Washington.
It was thought that the boys would
return in company with the Utah bat
tery and all would be mustered out
together at Fort Douglas, Salt Lake,
but the dope sheet got mixed.
lu view of the fact that the Idaho
troops will be mustered out of service
at the Boise barracks, the Short Line
will put on excursion rates or a spec
ial, if necessary, to arcouiniodato
friends, relatives and others of suf
ficient number who may desire to go
tô Boise at the time the boys are re
lieved of dully, which will require
several days after their arrival.
Tickets will be available from tho
19th to 23th, inclusive, with return
limit of January 3rd, which should
fill the bill, and holiday rates will
prevail.
We tender you our good will and
best wishes. Our purse isn't worth
having.
The more we read of the war the
less we believe of what we read. It
has produced some stubborn fighters
and some ungodly liars.
When the high cost of living becomes
unbearable we can roll over and die.
SUFFERERS FROM INDI
GESTION RELIEVED
"Before taking Chamberlain's Tab
lets my husband suffered for several
years from indigestion, causing him to
have pains in the stomach and dis
tress after eating. Chamberlain 's Tab
lets relieved him of these spells right
away," writes Mrs. Thomas Casey,
Geneva, N. Y. Obta ins hie everywhere.
THE SPIRIT OF THE DAWNINO.
In the morning gray and ghostly,
Ere the lordly king of day,
Folds his robe and dons his helmet,
Guards his armer burnished bright,
Comes the spirit of the dawning,
Softly creeping from the night.
Creeping, creeping, never sleeping,
Mystery struggling toward the light.
'Tis a soul untutored rising,
Worlds may wax and planets pale;
Seas remove and mountains quiver,
But the soul once born can never
Ccasos its onward march, cr sever
Links that bind it to its giver,
And the living deathless spirit,
Groping, struggles onward to the light.
Ah, the uplift and the heart throb,
When the giorning conpuores night;
And the creeping stealthy temper,
Sees its armies put to flight.
Nor can darkness dwell in sunlight,
Gone are all the tents of sin,
And the silent, sleeping memory,
Wakes to battle ere the night.
And the cause is never hopelez9„
Oft the fight is only won;
As the sunlight fades to darkness,
And the day is nearly done.
Then awake to joy and gladness,
Oh ye hearts now sore distressed;
For the sunlight scatters shadows,
And the morning follows night.
THE PROHIBITION AMENDMENT.
Reports from Washington indicate
that nation-wide prohibition will have
an inning in congress in the near fu
ture, though possibly not at this session.
The anti-saloon clement is endeavor
ing to secure an amendment to the
constitution of the United States for
bidding the manufacture and sale of
liquor of all kinds in this country.
If this measure ever comes to a vote
in congress it is quite likely to carry,
for the reason that there now are 23
states out of 48 that have voted to go
dry, and it is said to be likely that the
legislatures in Utah and Florida will
pass prohibition acts this winter.
In the states that are wet and in
which local option prevails there are
very large sections of them that have
voted out liquor.
In order to sumbit a constitutional
amendment it is necessary to obtain a
vote of two-thirds of both houses of
congress, and under present conditions
it looks as though this might bo pos
sible, but this would not end the mat
ter, for were this done the legisla
tures of three-fourths of the states of
the union must ratify the action of
congress.
It is very questionable whether this
majority of the states could be ob
tained in the immediate future, and in
any event it would take some time for
all of these legislatures to act.
Most old-time Democrats are opposed
to the adoption of constitutional
amendments seeking to regulate things
of this kind, sueh as*prohibition and
woman suffrage, for the reason that
it is an invasion of the rights of the
several states to decide these matters
for themsedves.
The south today, with the exception
of Texas, Lousiana, Kentucky and
Florida, is entirely dry, but whether
the congressmen and - the people of
those states would vote to force pro
hibition upon commonwealths which
are now wet and do not desire to
change their condition is something of
a question, a sit seems to be contrary
to one of the leading tenets of Demo
cratic faith, which holds that the states
themselves have a right to home rule
and to decide all questions of this
character.
In considering this matter, however,
it is necessary to take into account
the general disposition of human na
ture, which makes one person desire
that others shall submit to the same
regulations which he has to obey.
In principle it hardly seems right
that one state shall be able to mak
its neighbor do something which it
does not want to do, but this is what
the rati, ition of this constitutional
ammo ncut would result in bringing
ai. it'..-—Butte Miner.
HIGH SCHOOL LECTURE COURSE.
The second number »will be the Ex
Congressman Adam Bede, who won
fame in the lower house of the U. 8.
congress as a humorist and a debater.
Later on he traveled over the country
in chautauqua work, debating with the
Socialist mayor of Milwaukee, Mr. Si
del. This number alone should be worth
the price of a season ticket.
The following month the Fairchild
Ladies quartet will appear. They give
a program of vocal, instrumental solos,
violin, 'cello, numbers, readings, whist
ling quartet work as well as ensemble
numbers of all sorts. They are one of
the strong numbers of the Redpatli com
pany.
The final number will be given by
the famous Sauranoft's, from the Con
servatory of Music of St. Petersburg,
Russia. (They give musical numbers in
costumes and recite the folk lore of the
Russian people.
This makes up a program par excel
lent. The tickets are now on sale. The
price is the same as former years, and
Oie arrangements are the same as to
u^e of tickets. One number each mouth
during the winter season. Telephone
for tickets.
WHO. AMERICA REDEEM MEXICO?
Now that the election is over and
Mr. Wilson has been entrnsted with
the reins of government for another
four years, there is one piece of work
that will forcibly demand his atten
tion, and that is the pacification of
Mexico.
We are all aware that the Mexican
problem presents great difficulties, view
it from whatever angle we may.^ But
they are difficulties that may be over
come, and as time goes on it becomes
more and more apparent that it is up
to the United States to overcome them.
The truth ,of the whole matter is
that Mexico is suffering from the same
misrule from which we freed Cuba—
the decadent Spanish rule.
Mexico is a republic only in name.
Not the first principle of popular rule
has ever prevailed in that country. The
forces that have always controlled her
destiny have been those bequeathed
by Spain. With misrule and oppres
sion on the one hand, and sullen hatred
and resentment on the other, it is small
wonder that she has been in a perpet
ual state of unrest and turbulence.
President Diaz was the only - ruler
in her history who ever maintained a
semblance of order, and he did so sole
ly by the use of the mailed hand.
Since his day poor Mexico has seen
naught but anarchy. Anarchy prevails
there today—anarchy and wholesale
brigandage.
Argue as we may against the idea
of intervention, the fact is daily be
coming more apparent that it is the
only solution. That enlightened Ameri
ca should sit idly by and make no ef
fort to remedy the intolerable state of
affairs prevailing there, 'is inconceiv
able. Mexico is a blot on the western
civilization, and only western civiliza
tion can erase that blot. ,
Of course every American wishes that
the redemption of Mexico may be ac
complished by peaceable means if pos
sible. But the progress eeipg made in
that direction appears to the average
mind as negligible. The matter seems
no nearer a solution today than it did
50 years ago.
From the days of President Buchanan
until today, every president has had
the same difficulties to contend with
there. Each has had his vexing "Mex
ican question," and it is remarkable
how similar have been the circumstances
that each has had to face.
Not only the present generation, but
the unborn generations of the future
of that un^pppy land, demand of us
that we coûter upon them some of the
blessings that forefathers bequebthed up
on us.
Twenty years ago Cuba was in as
pitiable condition as Mexico is today.
We have remade Cuba and rehabilitat
ed her, and today she is enjoying that
peace and prosperity which her natural
advantages merit.
We can do the same for unhappy
Mexico. We should do the same for
her. But, will we do itf
a
COUGH MEDICINE FOB CHILDBBN
Mrs. Hugh Cook, Seottsville, N. Y.,
says: "About five years ago when we
were living ip Garbutt, N. Y., I doc
tored two of my children suffering from
colds with Chamberlain's Cough Rem
edy and found it just ae represented in
every way. It promptly checked their
coughing and cured their colds quicker
than anything I ever used." Obtain
able everywhere.
The Lord knows us as we are. But
fortunately there is but one Lord.
TYPHOID s
than Smallpox. Amf
experience has d em o n s tra ted
the almost miraculous effi
cacy, ud harmlessness, of Antityphoid Vaccination.
Be vaccinated NOW by your physician, you sad
Four family. It is more vital than house Insurance.
Ask your physician, drugs 1st, or send for M Hava
Joa bad Vyphold?" telling of Typhoid Vaccine,
tes aits from use. and danger from Typhoid Carriers.
THF CUTTER LABORATORY, BERKELEY, CAL.
Paoauciae vaccines a Simms uaoea u. s eov. uctasa
jHRISTMAS Morning—
you certainly want your
home warm and comfort
able; lor the " kiddies '
are up so early and they
mutt not shiver with cold.
4 Protect your children and your
self the long winter through against
the cold and damp—and enjoy the
warmth and comfort which
I -*k a
will bring to you in its economical
way.
•I Rock Springs bums as well in
your open-fire as it does in your
furnace, heater or kitchen tanga. It
is long burning and has an extra
long flame.
4 Rock Springs wants to drive
"old man winter" from your home.
*-'t your dealer for it.
rv
A
FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS
The difficulty between the railroads
and their men is not yet settled, but
the calm and reasonable attitude of
the two -parties towards each other
strengthens the hope that the trouble
may be settled in the near future and
without any break in the relations.
Most likely, as with most such mat
ters, a settlement may come through
a compromise. That is the way diffi
culties are now generally settled in
the English-speaking world.
This town is going to improve not
by its citizens being content with past
achievements or present conditions;
not even by. a mere wishing for im
provement, for wishing and wouiding
by themselves never accomplish any
thing. Good as the town, there is need
for progress along various lines, and
the way to bring this about is by aa
earnest, wise and concerted action. It
is a real patriotic duty.
wr
O. S. L. Watch Inspector
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
, H. W. GAUMER
Doqtor of
Acute, and Chronic,
la
Ul
BLACKFOOT IDAHO.
D. A. JENKENS
Contractor and Builder
BRICK WORK A SPECIALTY.
BLACKBOOT, IDAHO.
W. A. B BAXLEY
Attorney and Counselor at Law
Practice in State and
Federal Courte.
Markus Blenkle Building
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO.
an
HARNESS OILING
Now is the tine to buy your hone
blankets and auto lap robes at
very reasonable prices.
FULL LINE OF
Home Made Harness
That are Strictly Guaranteed.
SH OE REPAIRI NG.
Blackfoot
Harness Shop
LEO HENISH, FBOPKŒTOE.
NO. 40 WEST BRIDGE STREET
loaoM n n—noBoamo—m
O POOOOOOOOOO O OO O OOOOOOOOOO
0
• F. HOWARD BIETHAN
9 Undertaker
® and Embalm«.
O N. Taylor, between Pacific and
O Idaho Streets
O Phones, Day 5 Night 31
O NEW AND UP TO DATE
O MORTUARY
O Auto Hearse in Connection
0 0 0 9 0 0

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