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The Bingham County news. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1918-1930, June 10, 1921, Image 1

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BINGHAM COUNTY I
Official Paper of Bingliam County
PUBLISHED KVSRY FRIDAY
Idaho Republican
Idaho .....- _ —
1L.W&
PRICE—$2.00 PER YEAR
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM, COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1921
VOL. XV. NO. 38
LOCAL ARTISTS
ATTRACT NOTICE
Several Students of Blackfoot Schools
Rank High in Anti-Tuberculosis
Drawing Contest
The hundreds of splendid health
■posters from all over the state pre
sented quite a problem for the judges
■who "were selected to choose the
winners in the health poster contest
iconducted by the Idaho Anti-Tutoer
culosis association. These posters
were on exhibit in windows ot' the
Mode stare, Boise, for a week, and
drew much favorable comment. The
stiate parent-teacher meeting at
Nampa also had an opportunity of
viewing many of the posters, and
great surprise was expressed at the
work of the Idaho children in the
disiplay -of artistic ability, original
ity of design, and application of
health ideas. Many beautiful draw
ings and paintings were received
which did not conform strictly to the
poster qualifications. Beside the
winners, those attracting much at
tention were a pen drawing by Kath
ryn L. Healy of Roberts, splendid
crayon work by the pupils of the
deaf and blind school at Gooding,
and an unusual freehand cutting .by
little Miss Cleo Wilson, age 8, of
Blackfoot. A freehand drawing of
"The Six Best Doctors," executed by
Miss Mabel Bennett of Blackfoot
high school, has, by urgent request,
become the property of Dr. Almond,
medical adviser of the state depart
ment of Public Welfare and will be
seen framed, on the wall of Dr. Al
mond's office at the state house.. All
other posters are now the property
of the Anti-Tuberculosis association
and will be highly prized for exhibit
■purposes. The association feels that
the "Modern Health Crusade" has
been more than justified in the
schools of the state. The winners in
the poster contest are.
Division 1—Class 1. (High school
and Sth grade, feehand) First, $5.00,
George V. Clark, Industrial Training
school, St. Anthony; 2nd—Ruth
Kohler, Junior High School, Black
foot; Honorable mention—Mabel
Armstrong, 8th grade, State school
for Deaf, Gooding; Kathryn L. Hea
ly, 8th grade, Lewiston; Odetta Cas
tle, 9th grade, Bonners Ferry.
Division 1, Class II—(High school
and 8th grade cut-outs)—1st—Mar
garet Wilson, 9th grade, Central
school, Blackfoot; 2nd—Marcus
Bischoff, 8th grade, St. Margaret's
school.
Division II, Class I —(5th, 6th,
7th grades, freehand)—1st. $4.00—
Henry Togashi, 5th grade, Declo;
2nd—$2.00, Oriole England, Arimo.
Honorable mention—Rosa Takala,
5th grade, Deaf and Blind school,
Gooding; Hortense Ward, 4th grade,
Deaf and Blind school, Gooding;
Chester McDonald, 5th grade, Wil
der.
Division II, Class II—(5th, 6th,
7th grades, cut outs). 1st—$2.50,
Gladys 'Foster, 6th grade, Cedar
Draw school, Wendell; 2nd, $1.50,
Marcus Blenkle, 6th grade, St. Mar
garets, Blackfoot; honorable mention
—Grade 5, room 9, Washington
school, Twin Falls; Howard Hender
son, 6th grade, Arimo; Lois Worley,
5th grade, Arimo.
Division III, Class I— (1st, 2nd,
3rd, 4th grades, free hand): 1st—
$3.00, grade 4, room 11, Bickel
chool, Twin Falls; 2nd, $2.00, Shir
ley Manser, Fruitland. Honorable
mention: Gladys Lines, Lincoln
school, Sandpoint; Cleo Wilson, age
8, Central school, Blackfoot.
Division III, Class II—(1st, 2nd,
3rd, 4th grades Cut outs): 1st—
$2.00, grade 4, room 8, Washington
school, Twin Falls; 2nd. $1.00, Nor
man Be'-k, Central school, Blackfoot;
Honorable mention: 1st grade, Ir
ving school, Blackfoot; LaVeda Os
borne, Zinc Spur school, Hailey; Ed
na May Florea, Sandpoint Ind. Dist.
1, Ponderay.
NEW 0. S. I. TIME
CARD
Northbound :
Train No.
31
To Butte ...............
8:00
a.m.
33
To Victor ................
8:25
a.m.
41
To Ashton ............
2:37
p.m.
29
To Butte ................
8:40
p.m.
45
Yellowstone 3pecial
1:40
a.m.
Southbound
46
Yellowstone Special
12:40
a.m.
32
From Butte ............
2:05
a.m.
42
From Ashton _______
10:00
a.m.
30
From Butte ............
3.45
p.m.
34
From Victor ........
8:05
p.m.
Mackay Branch
125
Departs ................
8:30
a.m.
126
Arri ves ................
.3:25
p.m.
Aberdeen Branch
307
Departs ................
8:30
a.m.
308
Arrives ...............
2:1:5
p.m.
Trains No. 45 and 46, Yellowstone
Special, do not become effective
until June 20th.
TWINS
ER VICTORY
Last Sunday's Game With Rigby
Places Blackfoot One Notch Near
er League Championship.
Blackfoot people are indeed be
coming proud of their 1921 base ball
team, as out of the seven games they
have played they have won six. Last
Sunday's game with Rigby added one
more count to their score, and placed
them a little nearer the final cham
pionship of the Idaho Independent
League for the season. Rigby failed
to score once in any of the nine inn
ings. while Blackfoot had five men
who scored—lThor,sten|berg, Owens,
Conger, Thompson and Eppling. Fol
ey pitched for Blackfoot, Vaught
having left the team, and Garvin
umpired the game. There was a
good attendance of local people, and
a number came from
Rigby
with
their team.
RIGBY
AB
R
H
O
A
Stanger, ss ....
...3
0
1
4
Chevalier, p....
....4
0
0
3
Hall, 3b- ........
....4
0
0
3
O'Neil, 2b ......
...3
0
0
0
Later, cf ........
...,3
0
1
0
Lindstrom, lb
..3
0
10
0
E. Birch, if ..
....3
0
1
2
0
Reeves, c ......
....3
0
1
Jas. Birch, rf
...3
0
0
0
BLACKFOOT
AB
R
H
o
A
DeKay, if ......
....3
0
1
0
Thorstenberg,
Cf4
1
0
1
0
Owens, 2b ......
....5
1
1
1
3
Conger, 3-bl .+...4
1
1
2
3
Bell, rf ........
...3
0
1
0
0
Thompson, ss
....4
1
0
1
3
Howard, lb ..
....4
0
11
0
Eppling, c .....
...4
1
2
0
0
Foley, p .......
....4
0
2
0
1
CHAUTAUQUA NOTES.
The average citizen has some
knowledge of lyceums and chautau
quas, but he little realizes what they
amount to in the life of thiä nation.
Officially collected figures for the
year 1920 present an astonishing to
tal of effort put forth by these forces
of popular education. There is no
state in the Union without lyceums
and chautauquas. Between 10,000
and 15,000 lyceums were in being the
last year, with an aggregate attend
ance of over ten millions, and 8,581
chautauquas were reported, with an
aggregate attendance of 35,449,750.
About one-thinrd of the aggregate
attendance in each case is said to
represent different Individuals. An
Invariable increase In business dur
ing 1920 Is reported, and a greater
increase in sight for the coming
year. And what is of equal import
ance are reports of a steady demand
to keep up and improve the quality
of the instruction or edification giv
en.
One of the hopeful things in life
is that if you can get to know people
you generally like them. Chautau
qua in a great degree, apd the ly
ceum in a lesser, brings people to
know other people. Especially does
Chautauqua gain a harvest in this
way by having Chautauquas for chil
dren—a wise provision for a better
America by and by. Another hopo
ful thing is the avid way students
at lyceums and chautauquas absorb
and revel in the expert explanation
of an unfamiliar subject. The war,
with its flood of lectures explaining
what we had to do for our country
and what other countries were do
ing to us. has left its influence on
our people and enlarged the view of
the average woman and man, so as to
include the world and its problems
and people beyond our waters.
The Lyceum-Chautauqua, or pop
ular lecture, is an American institu
tion. It is the university of the .peo
ple.
TAKEN TO PENITENTIARY
Last Saturday a sentence of from
one to three years was imposed upon
Louis Sayko, who was convicted of
marrying another man's wife. On
Sunday, he with two other convicts,
were taken to the state penitentiary
at Boise, by a deputy warden of that
institution.
The other two convicts were Frank
Harris, sentenced to from one to
fourteen years for grand larceny,
and John Lyons, sentenced to from
one to fifteen years for burglary.
A pretty home wedding took place
Saturday evening at eight o'clock at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. George
Jolley, when their daughter, Eva,
became the wife of Leslie Andrew,
of Rose, Bishop Jeppson of the first
ward performing the ceremony. On
ly the family and a few friends were
present, and George Waring and
Margaret Andrew, sister of the
groom, were best man and lady. Af
ter the ceremony dinner was served.
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Only One Ada Roach
This Is Familiar Saying About Noted Entertainer
Who Comes to Chautauqua With Ruth Freeman
99
r>
"Only one Ada Roach" has grown to be n familiar saying in the Chau
tauqua world. This inimitable entertainer has truly reached the top round
In her profession. When Ada Ronch smiles, every one smiles with her; when
she sings, every heart sings with her ; her stories and Impersonations have the
sparkle of true genius.
Ruth Freeman, "running mate" with Ada Roach for years, is abundantly
able to present n complete program alone. She combines real talent as a
violinist with exceptional ability and as an unusual artist In mimicry and
dialect numbers.
CHAUTAUQUA TICKET SALE
FRIDAY, JUNE 17
On the above date the sale of
Chautauqua tickets begins and it is
hoped that the required number can
be sold in the one day.
Please be ready to buy your tick
ets when the canvassers come to you.
The following ladies have agreed
to sell tickets and have been assign
ed districts as follows:
First Ward—Mrs. Howard Hen
derson, captain; Mesdames L. M.
Capps, Fred Fisher, J. T. Oarruth,
Geo. Campbell, Geo. Holbrook, Geo.
Butler, M. E. Officer.
Second Ward— Mrs. B. H. Hud
son, captain; Mesdames Leon Chap
man, D. Egli, J. W. Mitchell, J. E.
White, Jas. Christensen, Oro West,
Maude M. DeHart, Fred Pelky, J. C.
Fisher, Chas. Fisher, N. J. Thorsten
berg.'
Third Ward— Mrs. H. B. Kinney,
captain; Mesdames E. M. Hubble,
Nell F. Boyle, M. A. Jackson, Jas.
Boyle, W. W. Beck, S. Wilson, E.
Pearson.
Fourth Ward—Mrs. Eva A. Hottel,
captain; Mesdames Jas. Ryan, Jessie
Woodin, A. T. Springer, H. Sedg
wick, Mabel Wiloamuth, Ed. Thors
en.
Sugar Factory addition—Mrs. R.
A. Stewart and Mrs. A. F. Webb.
Between the Rivers—Mrs. O. W.
Clark.
YEARLINGS AND CATTLE
STEADY—HOGS SHADE HIGHER
Good to choice yearlings medium
and handy weight killing cattle were
steady and there was a slightly im
proved tone in tthe better classes of
stockers and feeders. Plain killing
and heavy steers were 15 to 25 cents
lower. Hogs were in active demand
at strong to 10 cents higher prices.
Lambs were strong to 25 cents high
er, and sheep steady to strong.
Today's Receipts
Receipts today were 12,000 cattle.
12,500 hogs, 9000 sheep, compared
with 7500 cattle, 7000 hogs, and 7,
000 sheep a week ago, and 10,600
■cattle, 11,100 hogs and 7250 sheep
a year ago.
Beef Cattle
Killers continued to show a prefer
ence for the good to choice yearlings,
handy and medium weight steers at
steady prices. Heavy, especially
rough, heavy grades, sold slowly at
15 to 25 cenös lower prices. Some
prime handy weight steers brought
$8.75, the top price for the day.
Light weight steers sold up to $8.60.
i Moat of the heavy steers with finish
J sold at $7.75 to $8.25, and the bulk
j "of all the fat steers brought $7.25 to
j $8.25. Cows and heifers were steady
! to 15 cents lower. Prime grades
j were the only kind considered steady.
I Veal calves sold slowly at steady
prices.
Stockers and Feeders
Demand for the better classes of
'stockers and feeders was active at
; strong prices, and all desirable kinds
sold readily. The plain and ordinary
; kinds sold slowly at unchanged
prices.
Hogs
1 Hog prices were strong to 10 cents
higher than last week's close. Trade
was active and an early clearance
GETTING INTO A
PROFITABLE GAME
An Alaskan gold mining company
is engaged in remodeling its plant
for tlie purpose of manufacturing
wood pulp for paper. Profits in gold
production are too meagre.
On ore the .possible profit is less
than a dollar the ton. Profits in
paper have risen to as high as $80 a
ton. Take a pretty smart gold mine
to beat that.
Times change. The paper indus
try was developed to supply the
printing and publishing industry.
Along with it grew the modest
wrapping paper industry, an admit
ted necessity. Wrapping paper was
largely made from waste and re-use
materials, straw, etc. The use of
paper in other lines has increased
until now It is said there are 1500
distinct articles manufactured in
this country from paper. Of this
great output three-fourths of the raw
material must come from the same
source as that of the newspapers.
Box and earton manufacturers use
three times the material required for
the newspapers.
Some genius a few years ago dis
covered that there was enough In
dian left In the majority of us to pay
three prices for our food, drugs, etc.,
if they were packed in gaudy, ex
pensive looking packages.
So the .paper situation has conn
to be controlled by this big demand,
which cares little about the price.
While the newspapers struggle fol
their very lives, under present prices,
tlie consumer continues to buy waste
ful packages, and growl about the
high cost of living.
Cheap paper built this well-known
republic—nothing else could have
done it. It is dangerous to tamper
with the only raw material possible
for the printing and publishing in
terests.
And when we are both murdering
the press and paying needlessly high
prices for the foolish decoration, it
would seem that the fool-killer is
overdue.
was reported. The top price was
$7.60 and bulk of sales $7.25 to j
$7.55. The price spread was the]
narrowest of the season. Pigs were I
quoted steady with sales at $8.00 to'
$8.50. Rather plain quality predom
inated. More eastern markets were
lower, with demand slow.
Sheep and Lambs
Sheep sold at firm prices and
lambs were strong to 25 cents higher. |
Most of the offerings were southwest j
sheep, and native spring lambs.]
Clipped Texas wethers sold at $4.00 ,
to $4.25 and clipped ewes $3.50 to'
$3.75. Spring lambs are quoted at
$9.00 to $12.75.
Horses and Males
Demand for horses and mules re
mains quiet with prices unchanged.
Receipts are small.
CHARLES M. PIPKIN, !
Market Correspondent.
The Wednesday game of base ball
between Blackfoot and Idaho Falls
resulted in a score of 23 to 6 in favor
of Idaho Falls. The game is said to
have been poorly played by both
sides.
REVENUE
Congressman From Minnesota Makes
Distinction Between "Earned"
and "Unearned" Incomes.
Congressman Oscar E. Keller of
the fourth district of Minnesota has
introduced into the house four reve
nue bills.
The first bill repeals all existing
transportation and sales taxes ex
cept those of tobacco, distilled spir
its, oleomarg trine, habit forming
drugs and products of child labor.
The bill also repeals the excess profit
tax and the ten per cent tax on the
incomes of t orporations.
The second hill amends the income
tax law so as to distinguish bet'ween
"earned" and "unearned" income.
Tlie tax on "unearned" income to
gether with the super taxes is retain
ed, but the tax on "earned" incomes
is cut in two.
''Earned ' income is defined as in
come derived from personal services
or from business personally conduct
ed.
"Unearned" income is defined as
income derived from rents of land or
other property, interest on motgages,
notes or bonds, dividends on shares
of stock whether in the form of mon
ey or stock dividends, and from any
source other than from the labor,
skill or business or industry person
ally conducted by the person receiv
ing the income.
The third bill amends the inheri
tance tax. Beginning with esflates of
$20,1)00 to $35,000 there is a tax ot
one per cent; $35,000 to $50,000
two per cent; $50,000 to $150,000
four per cent; $150,000 to $250,000
six per cent. Tlie taxes then gradu
ate on an increasing scale until the
point of $100,000,000 is reached, af
ter which the tax is 90 per cent.
Tlie fourth bill provides for a tax
of one per cent on land values in ex
cess of $10,000, after exempting
buildings and improvements, and in
the case of farms, eost of clearing,
and draining and maintenance of
fertility. This bill aims to tax
monopoly holders of natural resourc
es, valuable "sites" in cities and the
holding of land out of use. The ex
emptions are so applied to farms as
to exempt from taxation, according
to Mr. Keller's estimate, approxi
mately 98 per cent of all actual
farmers.
The four bills are sponsored by the
Committee of Manufacturers and
Merchants on Federal Taxation, a
national association of business men
of which Otto Cullman, 1346 Ait
geld Street, Chicago, is chairman;
and by the Farmers' Federal Tax
League of which Lieut. Gov. George
F. Cummings of Madison, Wisconsin,
is President.
Accompanying the bills Mr. Keller
presents a detailed estimate showing
that the three bills together with
■customs and other miscellaneous rev
enue, would raise funds sufficient to
meet the government budget, and in
addition, provide a sinking fund
which would pay off the government
debt in thirty years.
In a statement to the press Mr.
Keller says, "My revenue program
will relieve producing business of
$1,730,000,000 annually and the
people of from three to five times
this amount in inflated living costs."
"I am in favor," says Mr. Keller,
of the removal of all taxes on busi
ness and industry, including the ex
cess profit tax and the corporation
income tax. but only on condition
that my revenue program is accepted
in its entirety. If my new revenue
bills are rejected 1 will withdraw my
amendments repealing the corpora
tion taxes."
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BLACKFOOT PUBLIC LIBRARY
Following is the report of the li
brarian for the month of May, 1921:
Books loaned, 1838; average daily
circulation 70 plus; average Sunday
circulation, 26 plus; books lost and
discarded, 10; books repaired, 101;
books added to library, by purchase,
3; by gift, 82; number of cards is
sued to borrowers, 39; number of
borrowers, 2164; attendance for the
month, 2792; average daily attend
ance, 107; average Sunday attend
ance, 24.
Fines collected ........................$17.93
Rented Fiction ............. 4.50
Total Receipts ...................$22.43
Paid City Library fund....$17.93
Book doners for May: Mrs. Jessie
Woodin, Clay Holloway, Bernice
Stultz, Cottage Hotel, George Watts.
Mrs. Wilson H. Scott, Rolland Rob
bins, Mrs. C. Barnstable, Rosemary
Cowen. Mrs. L. E. McGinnis. Ameri
can Red Cross, Mrs. A. H. Simmons.
EDNA GILLESPIE,
Librarian.
ASYLUM PATIENT
Woman About to be Paroled Drinks
Denatured Alcohol With Fatal
Results
Mrs. Ruby Bridges, aged thirty
two, who was committed to the
Blackfoot asylum on March 7th this
year, being brought from Canyon
county, died Tuesday morning from
drinking denatured alcohol at noon
Monday.
The unfortunate woman was
thought to be almost recovered, and
the management of the asylum was
seriously considering the matter of
her parole. She was doing house
work at the home of Dr. Hoover, and
Ln tlie course of her duties she ran
across some of the fatal liquid which
had been concealed and forgotten by
the household. She was ambitious
and was allowed to work around at
neighbors' houses to earn money.
Her husband, who is dying with
consumption in New Mexico, kept
sending her telegrams to come down
there, and it is thought the nature
and frequency of his telegrams had
greatly delayed her recovery and
perhaps worked her up into such a
nervous state that she committed
suicide. She was the mother of sev
eral small children.
She found the alcohol In the house
and took the bottle to the orchard,
where she drank part of its contents.
Her moaning aroused the household,
und upon approaching tier she asked
to he left alone to die. She was taken
into the cottage, thence into the
asylum and every attention was giv
en but without results, and she did
nut recover consciousness after ask
ing to lie left alone. A pathetic let
ter ito a friend was found in tier ap
ron pocket, asking lier to come for
the children. Mrs. Bridges is origin
ally from Kansas. In Caldwell she
made three effort« at suicide; by
I poison, drowning and by railroad
j train.
The jury viewed the remains and
j heard the testimony of Doctors
I Hoover and Eaton. Mrs. Hoover and
I Mrs. Saunders, the hospital matron,
j read the commitment papers, letters
I and itelegrams, and t>he finding of the
jury was suicide. Following are
the names of the Jurors: Ray Crab
tree, Paul L. Kreft. O. L. Rider. Ir
win Carter, Jr., H. Dahlstrom, Leroy
Black, Sam iLoyd, H. F. Hoffman, W.
H. Cherry and J. H. Early.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
Forest fires ln the United States
annually destroy more than two bil
lion feet of timber, or material
enough to build a 5-room house ev
ery 100 feet on both sides of a road
extending from New York to Chi
cago, according to the Forest Service,
United States Department of Agri
culture. With four people to a
house, these 100,000 or more build
ings would provide a home for nearly
one-fourth our yearly Increase in
population—a number sufficient to
populate a new city each year the
size of Cincinnati, New Orleans, Min
neapolis, Kansas City, Mo., or Seattle.
More than 160,000 forest fires have
occurred in the United States dur
ing the past five years, 80 per cent
of which were due to human agen
cies and therefore preventable. These
conflagrations burned over 56,488,
000 acres—an area greater than that
included within the States of Ohio
and Pennsylvania—and destroyed
$85,700,000 worth of timber and
property. If this needless waste
were stopped and the material thus
saved put into houses, the various
business interests concerned in build
ing construction, such as lumber
dealers, carpenters, masons, and sup
ply houses, would, it is estimated,
ibenefit to the extent of more than
$400,000,000 annually. Bankers and
real estate dealers wduld also profit
through the sale of lands and by
loans on homes to the extent of an
additional $300,000,000. Tires' (1res
are therefore of vital concern to not
only the everyday citizens but to ev
ery business man and laborer.
Forest protection goes hand in
hand with national prosperity. Next
to food and clothing, wood is the
most indispensable product of nature.
Without wood there can be no ag
riculture. no manufacture, no com
merce. Forest fires destroy life and
property, impoverish the soil, drive
away animal life, cause floods and
drought, and make waste the play
grounds of the people.
Cavalry Troop B will leave Sun
day for Boise, with their hrses. sad
dles., and boots, for the two weeks
encampment. At Pccatello they will
be joined by the l:;..p of that place.

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