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The Bingham County news. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1918-1930, January 20, 1922, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091196/1922-01-20/ed-1/seq-5/

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HOME
SWEET
HOME
by
F. Paria
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GRADE CROSSINGS ON HIGHWAY
TO BE RT.nrrwATfl p
Wash! acton, D. C.—The grade
crowing* must go and they will be
eliminated wherever; , possible on
the roads at the Federal Aid High
way System, which will he built as
a result ol the passage ot the Fed
eral Highway Act. When the roads
which form the primary or inter
state system are constructed, no
grade crossing will be allowed to
remain that it is at all practicable
to avoid. Every effort will he made
to make the roads ot the secondary
system equally safe, but In this case
It is recognised that elimination
may not be practicable in all cases
at this time.
In making this announcement the
Bureau of Public Roads, United
States Department of Agriculture,
under whose supervision the fund is
allotted and construction is under
taken, is putting Into effect a pol
icy which it has long advocated in
principle, and whose adoption it has
urged with increasing effectiveness
upon state highway officials for
some time past. The policy is
meeting with hearty cooperation on
the part of the states, and the Am
erican Association of State High
way Officials by resolution have
pledged its best efforts to cooper
ate to eliminate grade crossings on
new construction.
In addition, the policy finds favor
among the railroads, some of the
::::
Ball Band
xirur cunc ppipcc
Ball Band
Overshoes
JiLW OMUL rKILLj
Rubbers
ARE CHEAPER
ARE CHEAPER
W ITHOUT ANY FUSS ABOUT IT, we gladly announce some of the prices on new Spring
Shoes. Everyone knows that shoes have been altogether too high. Shoe manufacturers have
taken a tumble to themselves and stylish, servicable shoes that wear, can be bought from Seeger-Bundlie
Co., "Everybody's Store,'' low enough in price to please you and allow a healthy profit for your favorite
store. The prices for 1922 have been made on Ball Band Footwear.
LADIES' SHOES
Fine Brown Kid.................... $3.75 to $5.00
Fine Black Kid.................... $3.50 to $5.00 |
Heavy Calf Shoes............... $2.75 to $3.50
MISSES' SHOES
I Fine Black or Brown Kid ....$2.00 to $3.75
Good wearing calfskin shoes ....$2 to $3.50
CHILDREN'S SHOES
Boys' shoes in good looking, well made
calfskin. Shoes in Browns and Blacks
are priced at ........................ $2.75 to $4.50
WE GUARANTEE EVERT/ SHOE BEARING THIS MARK
TO BE MADE EVERY FART SOLID LEATHER
LEATHER
PACI NOS
MADEffvwy part rut: ath er'i
SOL® LEATHER
LEATHER
TONGUE
__r leather
~\BOXTOES
LEATHER
COUNTER
LEATHER
INSOLES
[leather
PUTSCHE]
HEEL BASE
LEATHER
IVfanu/acrurvd Bu
J.W. CARTER and CO MP ANY
Mon',/' and Boys'' Goodyear* Welt Dness Shoes-
-Sold By
SEEGER-BUNDUE CO.
Prices quoted here are only a few of the many styles and prices
we have to offer. However, they give you some idea of shoe
prices as they are priced in our store. We are not advising peo
ple to buy shoes that they do not need, for shoe prices will go low
er before they ever go higher.
Men's Dress Shoes
Black or Brown .......... ...................$4.75
The make of this shoo is illustrated in
the cAit and we pledge you on our honor
this shoe is exactly as described. Solid
leather throughout, a tine handsome, dur
able dress shoe, that we are selling at a
price that allows us plenty of profit.
Men's Work Shoes
Are much improved in quality ai d
prices lower. Most people know that
we carry but one line of Men's work
shoes, the famous "Lion Brand," and
this brand of Men's work shoes at least
are cheaper.
....
• >1 I
Ball Band
Rubbers
Are Cheaper
Seeger-Bundlie Co.
"EVERYBODY'S STORE"
Ball Band
Overshoes
Are Cheaper
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•++ + ++ *+ i*+
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leading carrlens already having lent
cheerful aid in avoiding the con
struction of more grade crossings.
Instead of grade crossings there
will be constructed, wherever pos
sible, in the future either a Ibridge
or an underpass where roadway and
railway initerseot. Important roads
which now cross nd rearoas rail
road lines at grades hereafter will
be located entirely on one side of
the railroad, even though to do so
may increase the cost of construc
tion. State officiale, realizing the
need of eliminating grade crossings,
have stated their desire to cooperate
with the department in carrying out
this plan.
Where crossings are unavoidable,
or where local interests justify
construction of highways to cross
railroad lines, the road will be so
located as to pass over tthe track or
under It. In most instances of this
sort the railroads bear one-half of
the cost of building ithe bridge or
The prime object of the depart
ment's policy to eliminate grade
crossings on Federal Aid roads 1 b
the saving of human lives. This pol
icy prahably will involve increased
expense of construction in the case
of some roads, but it is believed this
la justified by the saving of lives.
During the three years ending with
1920, according to ithe best records
available to the department, 3,636
lives were lost at grade crossings In
the United States and 10,644 per
sons were injured.
oooooooooooooooo
o o
o LOWER PRESTO O
O O
oooooooooooooooo
Among the farmers of this com
munity the winter season is the time
of year when a period of relaxation
is to be had and the long armings
are given over t|o, visiting, parties
and general fun making, the spring,
summer and fall being too busy a
•time for anything but hard labor,
so that during the winter months
all the play of the year must bo
crowded in or not had at all. In
this way neighbors become bettor
acquainted, the problems of the com
ing season are discussed and a com
parison of methods made, so that if
better success has been made Iby one
the whole community is acquainted
with the method used, so that all
can try the same procedure another
year if Ithey wish.
R. D. Hughes and wife were in
Firth on a shopping trip on Monday.
Berkley Larsen and little daugh
ter who were operated on In Idaho
Falls the latter part of last week,
are reported to be on the way back
to recovery, and all their neighbors
hope thait they will soon he able to
be about again. Mrs. Larsen has
been staying with them at the Falls
and the .children have been staying
with Mr. Larsen's brother, Rate
Larsen, at Goshen.
M. A. Jensen and wife were
Blackfoot visitors on Monday.
Several from Presto made the trip
to Wapello on Thursday evening to
attend the old folks dance given at
that place. AU report having had
an enjoyable time.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Twitchell were
In Fiikh on bnsinesB on Monday.
The truant officer was In this
neighborhood on Tuesday, and made
a call «t the school, as It seems that
the attendance of some of the chil
dren has been so, irregular that' they
receive little or no benefit from «he
time they do attend, having missed
so much that they are unafole to
comprehend what little they do pass
over when they do attend, and ua
sually the parents of these Children
are the first ones to censure the
teacher for incompetence for the
backwardness of the children, in
stead of improving the attendance.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Vaughan,
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Hughes and Ir
vin Kaiser, spent an enjoyable even
ing at the (home of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Pratt on Thursday.
Eddie and Josephine Beiferd,
Adolph and Patrie Bsrtausky, at
tended the overall and apron dance
given at Kimball on Friday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hall were
callers at the David Johnson home
in Wicks on. Saturday. Mrs. John
son has been very 111 for soma time
now, and Mr. Johneon has decided
ito remove her to Salt .Lake City for
medical treatment.
Miss Mary Pratt spent the week
end with her parent# here.
Jacob Stutznegger was a caller at
(the G. O. Jensen home on Saturday.
Frank Pratt spent Thuraady At
the R. D. Hughes rauch, aiding Mr.
Hughes to saw wood, and Mr.
Hughes returned ithe favor by 'adding
Mr. Pratt on Saturday.
Mrs. Annie Teeplee Is visiting
with her daughter, Mrs. M. A. Jen
sen.
Gordon Vaughn and wife were
Firth shoppers on Saturday.
Practically ithe whole neighbor
hood, also people from Firth, Kim
ball, Goshen, Wapello, and Wicks,
gathered at the home of James
Maickie on Saturday evening, where
they were royally entertained. The
dancing was enjoyed by all, and at 'a
laite hour a picnic lunch was ser
ved, during which many a joke was
cracked and friendly chat indulged
in. The music for the dancing was
furnished by Edith, Fred and Wil
liam Mackle (and the Jeneen broth
ers. An endurance test was staged
between those who danced (the Vir
ginia Reel and the Jensen brothers
who played the harmonicas, and as
both sides were too fatigued to
claim victory, we are unable ito an
nounce the winners. The Mockiee
are charming hostesses 'and hosts,
and when at a late hour the revel
Piano Clearance Sale
Begins Monday, Jan. 16
Ends Tuesday, Jan. 31
We are offering our entire stock of High Grade
Baldwin and Straube Pianos at a discount, that will
be a saving to you of many dollars. Every Piano
must be sold. We must clean up. Every Piano is
priced BELOW COST. We lose, you win; for ex
ample an $860.00 Piano and 15 rolls for only $675.00
—with bench to match.
Many others to choose from at all prices and at
a saving of from $100 to $300, this month only.
Blackfoot, Idaho
ASK ABOUT OUR EASY TERMS
CLIVE MUSIC CO.
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO
This coupon is good for $5.00 on
the purchase price of a Piano or
Phonograph if mailed to us on
or before January 28th.
Name ..................................
Address ..........................
ers returned to itlheir homes (they all
agreed, that they had spent a vary
notable evening.
Miss Veras Garner of Idahome, Is
visiting at ithe W. B. Hall home.
Miss Garner hes been visiting rela
tives at Ogedn, Utah, and made a
stop here to visit with her aunt and
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Hall. She will
return to her home at Idahome from
here.
Miss Eva Gjetrupp and Mias Zeta
Hess, of Goshen, spent Ithe week
end at the M. A. Jensen home.
James Pratt wiaa ai buslnese visi
tor In Firth on Wednesday.
Peter Kalferd made the trip to
Firth on Wednesday where he did
the family shopping for the week.
Mrs. M. A. Jeneen was a daller at
the G. O. Jensen home on Tuesday.
Mr. Oarlsen made a business, trip
ito Blackfoot on Saturday.
Martin Jorgensen la visiting with
his sister, Mrs. Jack Jensen.
The past cold weather has driven
the Chinese Pheasents In to
straw stacks, and one Is able to
judge how numerous they sirs bl
ooming, as every straw stack has ell
the w<ay from a dozen to twenty of
the birds on Its top and sides,
scratching for the grain that may
be found in the chaff.
Peter, Eddie and Frank Kalferd
and Adolph Barltausky, spent Satur
day afternoon hunting Jackrabblts,
and report bagging a large number.
Mr. Kalferd Is using them las Chick
en feed and reports that they are
making the hens shell outt the eggs.
Leo Henesh purchased the Clnb
Cafe at Sheriff's sale Monday morn
ing;_

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