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The Bingham County news. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1918-1930, December 28, 1923, Image 6

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Closer fellowship between bankers and farmers was urged and a resolu
tion adopted affirming faith In the efficnc" of ths co-operative marketing Idea
at a meeting of the American Bankers Association Agricultural Commission.
—Newt Item.
SAVINGS MORE THAN
DOUBLE IN DECADE
New York.—Reported savings de
posits in banks and crust companies
of the United States have more than
doubled In amount during the past
decade, and the number of accounts
have Increased by about 141 per cent,
figures complied by the Savings Bank
Division. American Bankers Associa
tion, show
"If distributed equally among oui
entire population, the savings deposits
In 1912 would have given {89 to each
REFUGE
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hie"—that was agreed be- 1
iweeD all the boys at the
"works" where he put ln j
most of his time at small !
Jobs In addition to being
"peculiar," as his mates re
ferred to Watson's scoiiiug j
nature Watson was not in
good health. In fact, he admitted to a 1
"defective fly-wheel," by which lie
meant that his heart was bad. ;
Watson was u genius in his way Î
He hud !
1
By Char let Frederick Wadsworth
(©. 1923, Western Nowapaper Union.)
J4,
too, besides being peculiar,
some conception of u rude kind of art.
His liohhy was making molds and cast
ing little bruss figures and designs—
having it done for him, rather, after
ne hud perfected the molds— und often
lie would bring something new to the i
works for the hoys to admire and pur
chase.
Among his objets d'art, ns he called
theiu^ facetiously, were nsli trays of '
Get Acquainted with
Garvin's Clothing Store
30 North Broadway
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W. D. PIERCE
AUCTIONEER
Over twenty years experience in
the
Live Stock and Farm Sale Business
No Sale Too Large—None Too Small
For Dates and Terms
See Me At Once, or
PHONE 31 FOR APPOINTMENT
adult and child In the country," the
Division's report says, "but in 1922
the portion of each would have been
no less than f 158.*'
Th« officially reported savings de
posits are as follows:
, Deposits
1912 . 18,425,275,000
1922 . 17,331,479,000
106.7%
"This remarkable growth is attrib
utable to improvement in the services
of the banks for savers and to the
more consistent canvass for accounts
through advertising and solloltlng,"
the report says.
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Accounts
12,584,316
30,823,820
140.9%
,Increase ..
fanciful design, lamps, mirror frames
and whatever his fancy suggested.
His lodging place was close to the
works, and his room was more than a
bedroom—It also was shop and show
room. A little bench, with vise, blow
p lpe> «'es, a burnisher etc occupied
a corner, and the products of his genius
0t " e ° th6 ° ' . .
Watson had been complaining of his
Infirmity Just before Christmas, nut
f ee *f d lt t ®/ ake ^ ?
,n little crucifix which lie had just
corn Pl<-ted. The boys looked at one
another and smiled. , . .
When Watson failed to report at the
works the day after Christinas, Inquiry
was llla< i e for h im at his lodging pla--e.
Finally forcing the door, the searchers
foun d the "peculiar iiombre" kneeling
at his bedside in the position in which
he must have surrendered.
In one hand was a Christmas card
from his mother in an eastern state
and a letter addressed to her in which
he said he was sending her a little
present which he had been unable to
get ready sooner,
And !n the other hand was clasped
the little Image in which he had taken
so great pride—the Savior on the Cross.
' DECLARES RADIO WILL
PROVE FARMERS' GUIDE
NEW DRIVE ON WEEVIL
Poison for Cotton Pest Will Soon
Be Both Cheap and
Plentiful.
Throughout the southern cotton
fields the villainous boll weevil may
at last begin to tremble. Something
has happened which eventually, scien
tists believe, will shake his destruc
tive dominion to its foundations and
will reduce him to an absolutely im
potent factor in cotton growing. It is
a new process. Just perfected, by
which the most deadly boll weevil
weapon known to farmers, calcium
arsenate, can be produced economical
ly and abundantly by electrolysis.
This will make available within the
next few years, research workers de
clare, such quantities of calcium arse
nate, at such a comparatively low cost
to the cotton grower, that the spray
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Above—Charles Cadman, Composer,
and Indian Princess Broadcasting a
Concert Program. Below—An Opera
Singer In Studio of WGY, Schenectady,
N. Y.
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j of cotton lant8 will unquest ion
! a become universal. That has
the one condition lacking to put the
obnoxious boll weevil under complete
control,
oalolum arsenate electro - chemically
were conducted for months at the re
search laboratory of the General Elec
trie Company at Schenectady, N. Y.
The experiments have been conducted
by an engineer of the Alabama Power
Company, A. M. Kennedy, who first
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Exp' i-imunts in the . production of
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conceived of this method of manufac
turing anti-weevil "ammunition" dur
tng 1920.
The Kennedy method of producing
the arsenate by electrolysis will, it is
asserted, cost the farmer approximate
ly 25 per cent less than does the pow
der now in use; and its price, Mr.
Kennedy believes, will be stabilized
to such an extent that the psychological
effect of the present market fluctua
tions will be removed.
Mr. Kennedy has been proceeding
on the knowledge that the South is
well supplied with hydro-electric re
sources, assuring an ample supply of
j electric power for the use of the cal
cium arsenate plants which he feels
certain will come into existence when
the new process is put to commercial
use.
ELECTRICITY AND
WINTER HOLIDAYS
Winter on the farm! The long eve
nings are aproaching, and with them
come the winter holidays.
Thanksgiving, and following soon
afterward, Christmas and New Years;
then, in February, Lincoln's and
Washington's birthdays. Each offers
a chance to break in on the monotony
of cold weather and snow by a happy
program of festivities in a farmstead
aglow with light and warmth.
Assisting ln such occasions, on
farms that do such things electrically,
are ingenious decorations of light,
little strings of electric lights, made
primarily for Christmas tree decora
tions. They can be used for any in
door party, however, by simply at
taching the plug at one end to an elec
tric light socket. Then the little col
ored lights may be strung here and
there around the room or laid around
the dining table.
The lights consist of small Mazda
lamps with tinted bulbs. They come
in strings of eight to a dozen, and
there are extension strings which can
be joined to the original string to
make a longer rope of lights.
High grade Mazda Christmas tree
lighting sets, got out by the General
Electric Company, operate from spe
cial transformers, taking their cur
rent from the lighting circuit. They
can be depended upon and even if one
of them is broken, the rest burn on Just
the same. For indoor parties or holiday
celebrations they are ideal because
they give people a chance to "deco
rate with light;'' and they are capa
ble of adding much delight to any
term house gathering.
First,
Head of Radio Corporation Out
lines Its Great Practical
Use in Farm Work.
Nearly 50,000 rural mall routes are
in operation in the United States, rep
resenting a total of 1,190,000 miles and
serving 6,500,000 families, or approxi
mately thirty million inhabitants of
farms and rural districts. Yet impres
sive as this mail communication for
the farms of America undoubtedly is,
there Is a swifter and easier method
of spreading general intelligence to
the farms, which is mora public than
the mails, of course, but also vastly
more serviceable for the purpose. It
have not yet taken advantage of It, Is
briefly sketched by President James (
G. Harbord, of the Radio Corporation |
la radio.
What radio mean* to the farmer,
and what It can mean to farmers who !
of America.
"Radio," says President Harhord, j
"charms the ear with strains of mu- I
ale; It saves life and property on i
stormy seas; it annihilates distance |
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and time—and it penetrates the cot
tage of the farmer as easily as it does
the mansion of the millionaire.
Radio the Farmer's Ticker
"The radio receiving set will be to
the farmer what the ticker is to the
speculator in farm products. It is the
equipment which will place him on ;
even terms with the manipulator of I
his markets.
"Radio may perhaps lead to a solu -1
tion of many of the farmer's labor 1
problems. During harvest seasons,
when the labor supply is of manifest
importance to the farmer, broadcast
ing might well call attention to the
available laibor supply.
"And in case of epidemics among
farm animals—there is no dearth of
information as to the proper proced
ure at such times. The problem Is
to make such Information instantly
available. The farmer who in such pe
riods of emergency must act promptly
either has to consult a distant author
ity or wade through a maze of pam
phlets—unless he can get the informa
tion by radio. The same is true of
insect pests.
"The state master of a certain
grange organization which has over
two hundred grange halls throughout
the state Is investigating radio with
the idea of placing receiving sets la
every one of those halls. The posai
bilities of radio broadcasting in facil
itating the purposes of farmers' or
ganizatlons are practically limitless.
Education and Entertainment
"Perhaps the greatest usefulness of
radio to the farmer will be in tying
In with the extension work of agricul
tural colleges and schools. Radio would
open the door of the agricultural
school to tens of thousands who would
otherwise never receive such Inetltu
tional Instruction.
"Yet when all this has been said. It
is found that the cultural and spirit- <
ual possibilities of broadcasting have
been scarcely touched. Every high
school and even the country schools in
remote districts can have the benefits
of radio. And In the evening, after a
tiresome day's work, the farmer can ,
hear light opera or grand opera as I
readily as any audience in any city !
of the United States." 1
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An Appetite Booster
Would you suppose an electric «en
tllatlng fan could fan one's appetfte
Into a respectable glow? Well, con
sider the old tradition about house
wives who do their own cooking and
lose their appetites doing It. It's the
stuffy, over-heated atmosphere, streak
ed with a scramble of odors. With au
electric ventilating fan In the kitchen,
these disappear—and the cook's appé
tits Increases.
That Gobbler
for Christmas
By CLARA DELAFŒLD
They Just Co ild AI,, marin, I
Not Kill the bird 1_JB might let you
They Had $jM have the gob
Watched Grow CtMP hier for Chrlst
Up From mas '" saId
Babyhood las Hicks. ''He 11 be
a fine bird by then.
He's the only one I've
man. He was a farmer, and in busi
ness for the money it brought him. He
bad a brother John, who had gone to
But I dunno.
reared out of that brood, and I'm
klnder attached to him."
However, he promised Mrs. James
finally to let her have the gobbler.
Silas Hicks was not a sentimental
the city and in.ide money hand over
fist. John was a crusty old bachelor
and largely devoid *f the sense of
family obligations.
There had been a time, five years
before, when things went badly with
gy as There was a heavy mortgage
t0 meet> the crops ha(1 been a failure,
and he had been In danger of dispoe
session. Besides, his wife was on her
sickbed, from which she was never to
arise.
Silas had gone in his despair to the
brother whom he had not seen tor
years. John had turned him down flat.
"Father left you the farm because
you played up to him, and kicked me
out into the world," he said. "Now
I've made my pile, you have the nerve
to come to me for help. I don't see it,
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Silas."
"My wife's sick," pleaded Silas, "and
you've got more money than you know
what do with."
"Oh, I can find a use for it," John
( rejoined caustically. "Maybe if you'd
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shown ii little sympathy for me when
I was hoofing it on the sidewalks I'd
have a little more for you, Silas."
Silas went home. Somehow he man
aged to survive the crisis. But his
wife died, and he grew lonelier and
lonelier. If he had had a few thou
sand dollars he would have sold out
and gone south to live, somewhere
away from this bleak New England
coast. But he could Just manage to
make both ends meet Dally he cursed
his brother in his heart.
He started raising turkeys, and that
was a failure. Only the gobbler lived.
He used to watch the bird with in
terest. The gobbler would come cluck
ing after him for crumbs. And it was
odd how it looked like John.
file began to call It John. It had a
queer way of putting Its head upon
one side and calling, as John used to
do when he was a boy. Gradually, to
old Silas' fancy, the gobbler became
an effigy of John. He hated it.
He hated It, and he was attached,
too. He made a sort of pet of the
gobbler. He wanted It to love him,
so far as a turkey gobbler is capable
of love. Then, when Christmas came,
he was going to cut Its throat very
slowly, bending Its head hack to see
the terror in its eyes. He would thus
have his revenge upon his brother.
"Yes, inarm, John's thriving nicely
and putting on flesh," lie told Mrs.
Janies. "Here he comes. John! John!"
Up came the big gobbler, put Its
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head on one side and surveyed Silas
to see If he had any bread crumbs,
"Isn't he the cutest thing!" said
r Mrs. James. "I don't wonder you
can't bear to let me have it, Mr.
Hicks."
k).
"Oh, that'll be all right, marm,
j sponded Silas cheerily.
An elemental hatred for the gobbler
Christmas
re
had come to fill his heart,
was at hand. He pictured how, on the
morrow, he would grab the bird, he
would insult It with all the turkey
abuse that he had picked up from It;
then it should die slowly, as he would
like John to die.
On Christmas morning he found a
letter from an unknown correspondent
in the city. Opening It, he read that
hJs brother John was dead.
John had left forty thousand dollars,
half of which was to go to Silas. "In
memory of our boyhood times together,
and in the hope that any 111 feeling,
if it existed, has long ago been can
celed.
- You ^ bIg faker> yoal - bellowed
o,,..
Silas stared at the letter. His eye«
grew misty. He saw John again as a
little boy upon the farm ; his heart
went out to him across the years. •
Gobble! Gobble! The big turkey
was standing In front of him, its head
on one side, one claw raised, begging
for crumbs.
The gobbler, looking s little alarmed,
retreated a step or two.
"Oh, Mr. Hicks, I'm willing to pay
for that turkey, but somehow I—I feel
I just can't eat him after seeing him
grow up from babyhood."
"Wal, Mrs. James, I was kinder
feeling that way myself," said Silas
Hicks, scratching his head. "You see,
Fm selling out and going south, and I
was figuring on taking him along
raising turkeys."
(te II». WaaUn Nmp.Hr Dam.)
oooooooooooooooo
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PINOBEE
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(Keclered December 1!))
Quite a few people from here at
tended Priesthood meeting in Black
foot, also Sunday services there last
Sunday.
Mrs. S. Beebe has gone to Oregon
to visit relatives.
The bazaar given by the helping
hand club on the 9th was well at
tended and everybody had a good
time.
Si Fackrell son of Mr. and Mrs. R.
P. Fackrell, also Mr. Bedwell and
sons Wayne and Pete of Springfield
have returned home after spending
two or three weeks In Oakland, Calif.
Mrs. Dorothy Buchanan has been,
visiting home folks at Wapello.
A party was given Wednesday eve
ning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.
P. Fackrell in honor of their son Rob
ert Lynn and wife.
e( j.
Music, games,
songs and dancing were enjoyed. Re
freshments were served. Many nice
tokens of rememberance were recelv
Elder L. R. Thomas of Blackfoot
was the home missionary here recent- *
ly at the L. D. S. services. He gave
some very instructive and interesting
remarks.
The Primary will give an entertain
ment here next Friday night Dec. 21st.
A good time is expected. A play will
be given followed by a big dance.
LOST—One large gray horse about 9
years old. Branded T on left thigh.
One black mare 2 years .old brand
ed .T left thigh. One black mare S
years old, strip In face, branded P on
left shoulder. One bay horse brand
I ed IP on left thigh, about 4 years old.
1 One hay horse branded PRM on left
shoulder. Call J. R. Stocking, Phone
464R1.
Adv.
GET YOUR
BUTTER WRAPPERS
PRINTED
AT THE
BINGHAM COUNTY
NEWS
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Meets first and third Wednesdays of
each month at I. O. O. F. HalL
Blackfoot Camp No. 893
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Visitors Welcome
L. R. CLEGG,
F. H. HA8SINO,
Clerk.
c. c.
ROYAL NEIGHBORS
Meets the Second and Fourth Tuesdays
of Each Month at I. O. O. F. Hall.
DORA HINES, JENNIE ROSSITER,
Oracle. Recorder.
\
shove: city lodge: no. ss
A. F. & A. M.
Meets the second and fourth
Wednesdays of each month.
Visitors Welcome
Masonic Temple. Anderson Bin
G
Pioneer Camp No. 2530
HODEUIN WOODMEN OF AMBRIOA
Regular Meeting Nights, First and
Third Mondays of each month at
I. O. O. F. Hall.
O. J. HALLBERG.
Consul.
T. J. JOHNSON.
Clerk.
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Grove City Circle No. 431
NEIGHBORS OF WOODCRAFT
Meets the Second and Fourth Thurs
day of each Month at K. of P. Hall.
Mrs. Forest Bales, Guardian Neighbor
Mra. E. C. Stephens, Clerk
Athenian Lodge No. 44
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meets Every Tuesday Evening at 8.00
o'clock at K. of P. Hall.
O. J. HALL BERG,
C. C.
E. E. MASSIE
K. of R. & S.
BLACKFOOT CHAPTER NO.
23, R. A. M.
Meets the First and Third
Fridays of Each Month.
Visitors Welcome
Masonic Temple, Anderson Blk
MT. PUTNAM COMMANDERY
K. T. NO. 12
Meets the Second and Fourth Fridays
of Each Month.
Masonic Temple
Visitors Welcam«
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YOU SHOULD
ALWAYS BF CAREFUL
in the Selection of Someoae te
handle your
Household Goods
It Makes Ho Difference
Whether you
STORE, MOVE, PACK OR SHIP
We are prepared to render yen
efficient and trustworthy ter
ri ee.
White Transfer and
Storage Co.
PH OH* 48
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