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The Bingham County news. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1918-1930, December 28, 1923, Image 7

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091196/1923-12-28/ed-1/seq-7/

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Ted's Gift to
the Christ Child
§♦♦♦«
ND there were in the same
country shepherds abiding
1 in the field, keeping watch
over their flock by night."
Slowly and reverently the
minister read the beautiful
old Christmas story to the
waiting congregation. Ted
settled snugly against the
back of the pew and listened. He had
I'ltened to the story every Christmas
Looming as far back as he could re
member; but today it seemed differ
ent 1
» "And suddenly there was with the |
j/ angel, a multitude of the heavenly
" host," continued the minister.
Ted's eyes grew wide with wonder.
It was more wonderful, more beauti
fy than any fairy story he had ever
read
"And, lo, the star went before them,
and led them to where the young
child lay,"
^ lAfld ïh^y brought him gifts, gold,
and frankincense, and myrrh/'
Ah, those kings wefe rich ; they
could afford to bring hjjp gifts. HÔ
pitied the shepherds. They brought
ffo gifts; they must have been poor
tike hLjp I Then he iooked up quickly :
yAnd we, too, may bring Him gifts;
th| cuj tfell âs th# 'aged,'' con
cluded {he minister.
r Ted's breath came quickly and hb$
•yes shone with excitement. He whi
a Utti§ child, and he-was poor, and he
w&hted to give the Christ Child a gift,
f The people were trooping fotit of the
church nôw, lu taérrÿ groups. No
body noticed the shabby little boy,
who, with flushed face and question
ing eyes, went slowly down the steps
and turned into a side street. Sud
denly he remembered; the cloud left
his face and he dashed joyously down
the snowy sidewalk. A wonderful
thing had happened last night ! Santa
Olaus had paid a visit to his home for
the first time, although be had hung
his faded, little stocking under the
mantel every Christmas eve. It was
so nice to have a Christmas gift of
his own; Ted thought lovingly of the
new top and quickened his steps.
"A little child may bring him gifts,"
the words rang through his head.
Well, he had nothing to give. Then he
■topped short—be had his topi
The next Sunday morning a little
boy in a threadbare suit slipped
quietly Into a back pew of the great
church. He carried with him an odd
ly-shaped package, which he fingered
lovingly all through the service. Then
the organ played softly and be could
hear the clink of the money as it fell
Into the collection plate. He held the
precious package close to him—the
plate was coming nearer—it bad
passed into the next pew—now It had
reached hl« I He heard the package
drop with a dull thud Into the plate.
Then he leaned hack, unmindful
Hie curious glances In his direction.
A little, quivering sigh escaped his
Ups; but Ms eyes were bright and
there was something glad In his heart,
lit« Christ Child had accepted Ted's
gift.—Jennie U. Mills, in Farm and

g j ggg ij g j g gggBg
Chriàma$~
Us Origin
. ^ M ANY of the most important
symbols and practices of
Christmas observance are
of distinctly pagan origin,
the result of the early
jftftwV church reconciling heathen
mm converts by adopting the
more harmless features of
their festivities.
Nobody knows anything definite
about the origin of Christmas as a
festival time, who first celebrated it,
or when or how. Nobody knows If
December 25 is the right anniversary
of Christ's birth.
Celebration of birthdays was con
sidered heathenish by early Christians
and it was not until after 841 A. D.
that an investigation was made into
the date of Christ's birth by order of
Pope Julius. This set the date at
December 25, although many sections
celebrated January 6, April 20, March
29 and May 20.
Pope Julius set the date as Decem
ber 25, and established the festival at
Rome on that date. This is the date
of the winter solstice, when winter be
gins to decline toward spring, which
for centuries before Christ had been
celebrated by Druids and oti ?r pa
gans as the chief festival of t..j year.
Mistletoe was an object of special
veneration with the Druids, and was
gathered with great ceremony in De
cember. It survived In Christmas ob
servance with the kissing, a relic of
the Saturnalia of the ancients.
The Yule Log of old England began
in the Druidic bonfires celebrating the j
Yule festival.
I
I
__
Tirtr PfttM Pitnnivr 1
Pi rile are old I
Plum pu fc Christmas 1
English dtsnes,ser\ea at c ■
to sjm
by the Wise Men to the little Savior.
GREAT CHRISTMAS SPORT
What has become of the boy of half
a century ago who on Christmas morn
ing would take his single-barrel muz
zle-loader with 15 cents worth of am
munition and fare forth in the snow
to shoot rabbits, and think be was
haring tbe beei time erer?
Christmas Day
in Own Home
Ri) ETHEL COOK ELIOT
Mother, Father
and Children
Have Special
Quests at
Family Feast
M ALMOST
glad we're
not going to
our Grand
mother's for
Christmas this
year," Mrs. Will
confided to Mr. Will a week before
that great day. "Do you realize we've
never had a Christmas here in our
own home, Just ourselves and our
family?"
"Yes, I've been thinking of that"
Mr. Will replied. "Let's keep it Just
ourselves, and give the kiddies one
truly home Christmas to remember."
As usual, Mr. and Mrs. Will were
in complete agreement in their ideas
and emotions. Mrs. Will sighed con
tentment Mr. Will sighed content
ment, too; for after all, such harmony
as theirs is not so common in this
workaday world of wives and hus
bands.
But as Christmas day grew nearer
and nearer Mrs. Will suddenly realized
she was nursing a sick conscience.
There was something she had not the
heart tp confide to Mr. Will. Now,
Mr. Will had a sick conscience, toe.
There was something he had not the
heart to confide to Mrs. Will.
But fortunate|y everything vu
tÆ. before Christmas,
wee, dawned.
Billy, th? ea oldest, didn't know
what the Wbrd conscience meant. Of
course he had heard mother and fa
ther whispering about how nice a
strictly family Christmas would be.
straightened
that day gL
m
•p"
\A
/
$
ft
i
m
k*.
«
He had heard them, but perhaps he
hadn't understood their sentiment
Anyway, at luncheon, two days be
fore Christmas, he suddenly blurted,
"Say, Mom, I've asked Jim Larkin to
our Christmas dinner and the tree.
You know his folks are in Europe, and
he's Just staying on at the school.
Thought he'd like It here tetter. More
homelike."
"Oh, bother, Billy," Lucy cried—
thlrteen-year-old Lady Lucy,
aaked Patty Brow«. She hasn't any
folks anywhere, even in Europe. Just
that snobbish great-aunt who's giv
ing a big hoove party, all old folks,
and doesn't want Patty around. She
needs a home Christmas more than
your Jiral"
Father was eyeing mother anxious
ly. Her bright smile amazed him.
"Well, I'm sure there's room for them
both. I am glad you have such kind
hearts, children."
But now Mr. Will spoke timidly.
'Tm sorry, mother, but I, too, have
asked a guest. Couldn't help it some
howl That young Miller at the of
fice. He's so cut up about his moth
er's death, and a boarding house Is a
dreary place to spend Christmas." Mr.
Will's voice was timorous, almoet
pleading.
But Mrs. Will's bright smile had
nqw turne# to a calm, relieved one.
"6h', that's splen'dl# dear/' She said.
"For. do you know, I myseif have In
I've
s
»

m
i
Æ
m
m
1
vited that pretty little Gladys Haver
ill. She looked so woebegone when I
met her at the grocer's 8aturdey and
asked her whether she was going home
for Christmas. She said a poor school
teacher couldn't travel way across a
continent even for a Christmas at
home. What could I do ! And do you
know I've always thought Gladys and
Ted Miller ought to meet. They're
such nice young people—and Gladys
is so pretty I"
So that's what happened to the Wills'
precious family Christmas. But not
one of the Wills felt that he had been
cheated of anything. On the contrary !
And Mr. and Mrs. Will are in closer
harmony than ever. You see, they are
the same sort of people—not a too eom
thing in workaday life. And Billy
mon
and Lucy are growing up rather like
them.
(©, 1»**. WMtern N»w»p»p«r Unto».*
IN MERRIE ENGLAND
The English Christmas Is not unlike
save that we do not have their
ours,
pretty custom of "bringing In the
yule." In almost every family in Eng
land the boys and girls gather about
the burning log on Christmas Eve to
sing carols and tell Christmas legends.
Often the children who live In the
country assist at the dragging in of
the huge log. An English child would
not feel that it was Christmas if there
were not a bit of mistletoe hanging In
the hal1, under wWch the uawary are 1
hissed soundly. Little and big eat the ;
rich and blazing plum pudding, and all
j ota in the singing of Christmas carols ;
and cijurchgoing. |
I
i
A WISH
A Merry Chrletmas. yes. a day of
laughter,
And here'« wleh for every day there
after:
When Chrletma* goat, a • It of course
muat do.
May every day that eomae be merry,
A TJ J
Another tlCdC!
By Christopher Q. Hazard j
Artist Finds jttiavid SPEN '
Ne® Place for ML rEE looke ' 1 1
U'irrl« again at bis
V! !■ w '* tc * 1 w,rh i
OJ a Service some anxl- j
to Mankind ety - The * 10S P* tal '
lty of the old
southern home had been lavish, the ex- j
hibition of his paintings had been sue
cessful beyond his hopes, there had
been congratulations, and flowers, and
commissions. Quite overwhelmed with
courtesies and attentions, charmed by
the quaintness and beauty and cua
toms and scenes new to him, the artist
Puts a Halo on
1
longed to linger, and was loth to leave
the old city. But the northern train
that he must take was almost due, the
station was distant, and Ills hosts had
seemingly forgotten all about it, until
they suddenly appeared with apologies
and delivered him to the black coach
man and the am
lly coach, Fortu
nately, the train,
burdened with its
load of Chrlstmài
cheer,
also, so
it moved on Spen
cer was among its
passengers.
The rather mon
otonous landscape
throw him back
upon reflection,
and he found
himself reviewing
the sights and ex
periences of his
?fas late,
that when
V
m
i
ijvf
4
m
visit with pleas
ant amusement
Again he wit
nessed the bargaining of the old mar
ket. "Is you got enny aigs?" "1 ain't
sed dst I ain't." "I ain't axed yer is yo'
ain't, I axed yer ain't yo' is." He re
called the curious operations of the re
vival meeting that had so Illustrated
the picturesqueness of negro character
and hummed to himself the song that
had there been so Intensely sung:
w
Dere's a halo on His hald,
A halo, oh my Lawd.
But dere's one for me He sed,
A crown ob glory wen I'm deid.
A halo, oh my Lawd.
Dat's de kind ob hat ter git,
A halo, oh my Lawd.
In rain or shine hit's boun' ter fit,
I sholy am a-wantln' hit,
A halo, oh my Lawd.
And I kin feel hit sproutin' now,
A hale, eh my Lawd.
A crown ob shinin' on my brow,
Bach time to Hlm I mek a bow,
A hale, oh my Lawd.
As the train sped on the artist's rem
iniscences were Interrupted by the
voices of the conductor and one of
the passengers. "But this train does
not stop at Redfleld," ths conductor
was saytng, as he looked at the old
man's ticket. "It must sure stop this
time," answered the passenger ; "I Just
got to see Jim once more before he
goes. I only got the message this
morning. I want to wish him a merry
Christmas and a happy New Year
where he's goln'."
The conductor -
hesitated, then C
seemed to yield as
ho passed en, and
the old man aat
back in his seat,
unaware of the
*
atmosphere of
sympathy around
S m. Shortly after
e bell rope was
pulled, the train f
drew to a halt,
and kindly looka
followed him down
the aisle and on
to the platform of
the little station.
The incident was
barely finished and
the train had attained but little head
way when there was a sudden and ter
rible Jolt, followed by a crash and the
bumping of the cars over the ties, then
a stop and an affrighted silence,
broken by the voice of the Pullman
porter, crying out, "We's run through
an open switch and we's wrecked, but
ne' min', de train am standln' on de
groun'." Engine, baggage cars and
dining car were off and broken, b*t
the Pullmans remained on the track.
"H we hadn't stopped at Redfleld,"
e
said the conductor, "we'd 'a' been going
forty miles an hour and all heapeu up
at the bottom of the embankment."
In the artist's studio today there Is
a picture of the Christmas Christ, with
the halo that believing love has placed
upon His head. And Just below It an
other halo rests upon the head of an
old man. pictured there because of his !
unconscious but real service of man
H j S gjçjN vVAS SENSITIVE
-
gjj e wag young and pretty and her j
eyes sparkled with happiness. She j
stepped up to the counter of a men's
furnishing store during the busy
Christmas rush and asked to be shown !
gorae thlng that would make a nice
gIft for a ma „ The c , erk brought two :
grades of mufflers, one of silk and
the other of coarse knit yarn. She j
decided on the silk one In a moment. I
with the remark that the other was ]
entirely too rough for Charlie's sen- 1
j
i
kind.
«&. ltJI. W®*t«rn Newspaper Union.)
sitive skin. The crowd about the
counter smiled faintly. They all
guessed it of course—another newly
wed.- Kaîhertc Cdelman.
•fc. iw« *i.i
t v... 5 . fw || 1 aa)
looooooooooooooo o
TPfi AT Vrt»PTr«T«a AI
0 nUHOJI.8 ®
oooooooooooooooo
_
j
IN THE PROBATE COt'KT OK
binoham county, idaho
j n the Matter of the Guardianship
of the persons and estates of
(jlad/s S. Johnson, Garnny V.
Johnson, and Roah R. Johnson,
minors.
-
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHY PE-I
TITION J-'OR ORDER TO MORT
GAGE REAL ESTATE SHOULD
NOT BE GRANTED.
,
Hattie Johnson Weight, the Guard
j aa of the persons and estates of
Gladys S. Johnson, Garnny V. John
son and j^oah R. Johnson, minors
jj av jng on Gjj S 22nd day of December,
1923( prese nted to this Court and
jj]ed herein, her petition, duly veri
fied> pra ying for an order permitting
her t0 mortgage the rt?al prope rty be
] 0n gj ng to the estates of said minors,
or so much as is necessary for the
o
purpose of providing funds with
which to pay for th e maintenance,
education and support of said minors
for the causes and reasons set forth
in her said petition, to which refer
ence is hereby made, and it appear
ing to this Court from said petition,
that it is necessary and proper and
would be beneficial to the said minors
and would be for the advantage, bene
fit and best interests of the estates
of said minors, and those interested
therein, that the said real property
described in said petition be mort
gaged;
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, That
the next of kin of the said minors,
Gladys S. Johnson, Garnny V. John
son and Roah R. Johnson, minors,
and all persons interested in said
estates, appear before this Court at
10 o'clock A. M. on Tuesday, the 29th
day of January, 1924. to show cause,
if any they have, why an order should
not be granted authorizing the said
Guardian to execute notes and a mort
gage on said real property to secure
the payment of same, as prayed in
said petition, reference to which Is
hereby made for further particulars.
Dated this 22nd day of December,
1923.
J. E. GOOD,
Probate Judge of Bingham
County, Idaho.
(SEAL)
Adv. 15-16-17-18-19
NOTICE
Hav e two carloads of high grade
Holstein milk cows and threee-year
old heifers for sale. All are milking
For further
or will freshen soon.
Information write Rencher & Ware,
14-16-16-17 p
Downey, Idaho.
NOTICE OF ESTRAY SALE
Notice is hereby given that I A.
B. Stephens, Sheriff of Bingham Co
unty, Idaho, will sell at Public Auc
tion to the highest bidder for cash, at
the farm of Mrs. O. F. Smith, 2 miles
northwest of Blackfoot, Bingham Co
unty, Idaho, on Saturday the 12th day
of January, 1924, at 10 o'clock a. m..
of that day, the following described
estray animal:
One bay mare about 3 years old,
bald faced, hind legs white, lump
on left hind stlffle, no brands.
A. B. STEPHENS,
Sheriff of Bingham County, Idaho
By E. E. FARMER, Deputy.
National Park Lumber Company,
a corporation,
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
_
Adv. 14-15-16-17.
NOTICE OF ESTRAY SALE
Notice is hereby given that, I, G. C.
Scarborough, Constable of Basalt pre
cinct, will sell at public auction to the
highest bidder tor cash, at the Sund
qulst farm 4 miles west of Firth,
Bingham County, Idaho. on Saturday
the 12th day of January, 1924, at ten
o'clock A. M. of that day, the follow
ing described estray animal:
One brown mare about one year
old, both hind feet white and a
star In forehead. No brand.
G. C. SCARBOROUGH,
Constable, Basalt Precinct, Bingham
County, Idaho.
Adv. 14-15-16-17
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
BY SHERIFF
Plaintiff
vs.
John McGary and Elizabeth Mc
Gary, his wife,
Defendants.
Undep ^ v , rtue of an 0rder of
gale and Dgcree of foreclosure and
!th e 15th day of December A. D. 1923, j
jn the a )j 0Ve entitled action, wherein 1
National Park Lumber Company a 1
corporation, the above named plain- ■
tiff, obtained a judgment and decree
lot foreclosure and sale against Johnjcoin,
McGary and Elizabeth McGary, his I
wife defendants on the 7th day of
December, A. D. 1923, for the sum of
Five Hundred Forty-two and 89-100
Dollars in United States gold coin,
besides Interest, costs and counsel
fees $139.40 which said decree was,
on the 7th day of December, A. ,D.
1923 recorded in judgment book 6
of said court, at page 205, I am com
manded to sell the certain lot, piece
or parcel of land, situate and lying in
Bingham County, State of Idaho, and
Sale, issued out of the District Court,
of the Sixth Judicial District County
of Bingham, of the State of Idaho, on |
j bounded and described as follows:
Commencing at a point 53S feet'
South of the North east corner of
the Southeast quarter of Section 32,
j Township 1 North of Range 37, East
, of the Boise Meredian. in Bingham Co
untv Idaho, running thence West 287
the point of beginning.
Public notice is hereby given that
on Monday the 14th day of January,!
A. D„ 1924, at 10 o'clock A. \1. of that j
day, in front of the Court House door
|of the County of Bingham, I will, in
obedience to said order of Sale and
Decree of Foreclosure and Sale sell
[the above described property, or so
much thereof as may be necessary to
satisfy said judgment, with interest
and costs, etc., to the highest and best
bidder, for gold coin of the United
States,
I feet, thence South 132 feet, thence
I East 287 feet, thence North 132 feet to
Dated December 17th. 1923.
A. B. STEPHENS.
Sheriff.
By E. E. FARMER,
Deputy Sheriff.
L. Ivan JENSEN
Attorny for Plaintiff,
Shelley, Idaho.
Adv. 14-15-16-17
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT
West Side Irrigation District, Bing
ham County, State of Idaho.
PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that in accordance with the
provisions of Section No. 4389, Com
piled Statutes of Idaho. 1919. all as
sessments of the West Side Irrigation
District a public corporation, for the
year 1923, are due and payable and
will become delinquent on the third
Monday of December, 1923, at 6
o'clock p. m. on said day.
Payment of the assessment afore
mentioned, may be made at the resi
dence of H. G. Kleusner, Secretary
of said District, Route No. 4, Black
foot, Idaho, or at the First National
Bank of Blackfoot. Idaho.
This notice superceeds all previous
notices of assessment given for the
year 1923..
Dated this tenth day of November,
1923.
By order of the Board of Directors,
West Side Irrigation District.
14-15-16
H. G. KLUESNER, Sec.
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL
ESTATE UNDER EXECUTION
Idaho State Life Insurance Com
pany, a corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
L. L. Hurt,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
By virtue of an execution issued
out of the District Court of Bingham
County, State of Idaho, wherein Idaho
State Life Insurance Company, a cor
poration, plaintiff, and L. L. Hurt,
defendant upon a judgment rend
ered the 18th day of April,
A. D. 1923, for the sum of $231.44
dollars, United States gold coin, be
sides cost and Interests, I have this
day levied upon all the right, title,
claim and Interest of said defendant
L. L. Hurt of, In and to the following
described real estate to-wlt:
Commencing at the Northwest cor
ner of the NE% of the SE% of Sec
tion 25, Township 1 South, Range 36,
East Boise Meredian, thence East 59
feet; thence South 25 feet; thence
South 39 degrees 43 minutes west
1029.6 feet to the place of beginning;
thence South 39 degrees 43 minutes
west 65 feet; thence south 50 degrees ;
17 minutes East 325 feet; thence
Northeast along the bank of the
Blackfoot Canal Company's canal 206
feet; thence north 50 degrees 17 min
utes west 90 feet; thence south 39
degrees 43 minutes west 147 feet;
thence north 50 degrees .J7 minutes
west 234 feet to the place of begln
ning;
Also commencing at the northwest
corner of the NE J A of the SE*4 of
Section 26, Township 1 South, Range
36, East Boise Meredian, thence East
59 feet; thence south 25 feet; thence
south 39 degrees 43 minutes west 920
feet to the point of beginning; thence
south 39 degrees 43 minutes west 65
feet; thence south 50 degrees 17 min
utes east
325 feet; thence north 39
27 minutes east 212 feet;
degrees
thence north 50 degrees 17 minutes
west 90 feet; thence south 39 degrees
43 minutes west 147 feet; thence
north 50 degrees 17 minutes west 234
feet to the point of beginning.
said Lot) of Lot 3 in Block 6, and
Lots 7 and 8 in Block 6 of McCullens
Addition to Firth, in Bingham County,
Idaho as shown on the official plat. I
Public notice is hereby given that !
Also Lot 1 In Block 7 of Shockeys
Addition to Firth; the South 28 feet
(extending from the front to rear of
x win, on the 5th day of January, A. |
d. 1924. at 10 oclock A. M. of said (
da y in front of the Court House door
0 f the County of Bingham, sell at
public auction for United States gold
all the right, title, claim and ,
interest of said defendant L. L.
Hurt, of. in and to the above de- |
scribed property, or so much there
of as may be necessary to raise suf
flcient money to satisfy said judg
ment, with Interest and costs, etc., to
the highest and best bidder,
Dated December Hth» 19 28.
-A. B. STEPHENS,
Sheriff,
By E. E. FARMER,
Deputy 8heriff.
13-14-15-16 Adr.
NOTICE OK MALE OK HEAL
_
Idaho State Life Insurance Com
pany, a corporation,
Plaintiff.
ou t 0 f the District Court of Bingham
ESTATE UNDER EXECUTION
vs.
william Hutchinson,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
By virtue of an execution issued
County. State of Idaho, wherein Idaho
State Life Insurance Company, ä cor
poration plaintiff, and William Hutch
inson, defendant, upon a judgment
rendered the 9th day of February,
A. D. 1923, for the sum of $216.00
dollars, United States .gold coin, be
sides cost and interests. I have this
day levied upon all the right, title,
claim and interest of said defendant
William Hutchinson of, in and to the
following described real estate to-wit:
Lot 1, in Block 7 of Shockeys Ad
dition to Firth; the South 28 feet (ex
tending from the front to the rear of
said Lot) of Lot 3 in Block 6, and
Lots 7 and 8 in Block 6 of McCullens
Addition to Firth in Bingham County,
Idaho, as shown on the official plat.
Also Lot 2 and the East % of Lot 3,
Shockeys Addition to Firth, Bingham
County, Idaho.
Public notice is hereby given that
I will, on the 5th day of January, A.
D. 1924. at 10 oclock A. M. of said
day in front of the Court House door
of the County of Bingham, sell at
public auction for United States gold
coin, all the right, title, claim and
interest of said defendant William
Hutchinson, of, in and to the above
described property, or so much there
of as may be necessary to raise suf
ficient money to satisfy said Judg
ment, with interest and costs, etc., to
the highest and best bidder.
Dated December 11th, 1923.
A. B. STEPHENS,
Sheriff.
By E. E. FARMER,
Deputy Sheriff.
13-14-15-16 Adv.
ALIAS SUMMONS
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE
SIXTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF
IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUN
TY OF BINGHAM.
ESKEL ESKELSON and MINNIE
ESKELSON,
Plaintiffs.
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS and UN
KNOWN DEVISEES of William
Wearyrick, Deceased, and THE
UNKNOWN HEIRS and UN
KNOWN DEVISEES of Mary E.
Wearyrick, Deceased, and ALL
UNKNOWN OWNERS of that
certain tract of land in Black
foot, Bingham County, Idaho
being 125 feet by 125 feet In
square form, bounded by Uni
versity Avenue on
the north
west and Washington Street on
the Southwest and described as
Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 In Block
11 of Elmwood Addition to the
Town of Blackfoot, Idaho In the
original pict of said Addition
as filed In the office of the
County Recorder of Bingham
County, Idaho.
being 125 feet by 125 feet in square
form, bounded by University Avenue
on the northwest and Washington
Street on the southwest and Describ
ed as Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in Block
I
Defendants.
The State of Idaho sends greetings
to The unknown heirs and unknown
devisees of William Wearyrick, De
ceased, and the unknown heirs and
unknown devisees of Mary E. Weary
rick, Deceased, and all unknown
owners of that certain tract of land
in Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho
11 of Elmwood Addition to the Town
of Blackfoot, Idaho In the original
plat of said Addition as filed In the
office of the County Recorder of
Bingham County, Idaho, the above
named defendants.
You are hereby notified that a
complaint has been filed against you
in the District Court of the Sixth
Judicial District of the State of
Idaho, in and for the County of Bing
ham by the above named plaintifts
and you are hereby directed to appear
and answer the said complaint with
in twenty days of the service of this
summons If served within said judi
cial district, and within forty days if
served elsewhere.
»
This action is brought for the pur
pose of quieting title in the plaintifts
to the above described land. It la
alleged in the complaint that the
plaintiffs are now and for more than
five years immediately proceeding the
commencement of this action have
been the owners in the exclusive poss
ion of said land under color of title
and have during said time paid the
taxes thereon; that the defendants
claim some interest therein but that
their claims are without right, title or
Interest in or to said property or any
part thereof.
! part thereof.
| And you are further notified that
( unless you so appear and answer said
complaint within the time herein
specified, the plaintiff will take Ju4R
ment against you as is prayed i®
, said complaint.
Witness my hand and the seal of
| said District Court, this, sixth day
0 f December, 1923.
H. A. BENSON, .
Clerk,
By FLORENCE MALLORY,
Deputy.
(SEAL)
THOMAS & ANDERSEN,
Attorneys for Plaintiffs,
Residence and P. O. Address:
Blackfoot, Idaho.
Adr. 13-14-15-16-17-18

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