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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, August 05, 1904, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1904-08-05/ed-1/seq-8/

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[Mr. Wragg invites contributions of
?wtm*in m"' wl^.^"pres^c 18 .aifrt
would he pleased to answer correspond
ents desiring Information on rublects
discussed. Address M. J. Wrap*. Wau
kee. Tows ]
The handling of bees j.- an art,
though it requires but little skill in
the operation. An amateur in the]
apiary asks us "how the hiving of
bees should he done, win' kind of a
box, and how to pr.m- d to remove
them to their new home?" On this sub
. ject we quote Mr! Sutcliffe:
t
r
K*
©JEN
■I ...M I 7 - I
Conducted fcy
M- J. WRAQO.
HOW TO HIVE BEES.
We prepare first our empty hives In
putting a strip of comb foundation iy 2
inches wide on each frame, press it
tight, on the frame, then take a small
brush and dip it in hot wax, stroke it
along the fop of me foundation. This
will make it fast when the wax is
cold. Next we need a cloth—oilcloth
is best.
it so as to cover .the top
s. Now we say the swarm
or. We must watch it and
.ere it. will settle. Watch the
outer edges of the swarm. When it is
settled, take the liive we have pre
pared, set it down near the cluster so
that the bees, when you shake them,
will fall in front of the hive. Take a
dipper and dip a few of the bees and
of
is
see
put them in front of the entrance. ,
Dip another, and when the queen is in
you may dip more. Watch for the |
queen; if you see her go in the hive,
you may take a larger tin for dipping.
Dip them all off. If the queen is in
the liive the bees will all go in. If
there are a lev, on the hive, brush
them off -and get them in as soon as
possible. Take the hive to the old j
stand, and the hive the swarm came
from can he taken to a new, shady
place.
' Occasionally we find a farmer who
is afraid to give his cows the fresh
buttermilk. What queer ideas some
people get in their heads! We find it ,
a grand food for hogs when mixed
with meal into a slop, or given as a
drink when corn is fed for a solid
food.
i
great success which the agri
cultural colleges have had at the In
, ternational live stock shows has done
much to give to cattle breeders and
feeders increased respect for the men
who teach in such institutions. The
demonstration of the fact that the
men who teacli can also do has been
very effective. This year the Short
horn, the Angus and the Grade cham
pionships, as well as the grand and re
COLLEGES are getting there.
The
serve championships went to agricul
tural colleges.
The Animal Husbandry department
of the Iowa Agricultural college won
forty-nine prizes, including two grand
championships, of the aggregate
amount of $1,600 at the International
live stock show. The college tn' s
special pride in the fact that p ■
tically every animal in its exhibit e
bred on the college farm. The experi
ment station of Minnesota took cash
prizes amounting to $1,21C, and one
The dog and cat have their proper
place on the farm, but, Ilk* the cow.
they must be of the right sort and
quality. A good mouser will save dol
lars for her owner every year in pre
Tenting the gnawing of bags, grain
championship.
and buildings.
Sweet arbutus, sweet nrbutus,
Within the forest gloom,
You come lo grace each sheltered place
With beauty and perfume.
Spring's tirstling—l'r-a 11. yet unafraid
Of all the Frost King's power.
So pink and white, so fresh and bright,
Aty bonny wlldwood (lower."
The only man who lias not yet
—Hoe Fore.
greatly profited by the trust principle
is- the farmer. He is still working
along in the old way. He toils away
on his farm just as lie did before the
theory of the trust was ever dreamed
of, taking his corn and his potatoes
and his word away in the old lumber
wagon and spending days in the city
dealing them out at such prices as he
may be able to command, or perhaps
closing them out at figures quite be
low the col of production, in rase the
market should be crowded, as is often
the case. Then he is at the mercy of
the buyer. There is no fixed price for
anything he may have to soil. I: ry
man is a : .v unto himself, save when
overproddri on or overcrowding tem
porarily controls the situation, and
then it is v. > -;ice between talcing his
goods back home or accepting the
terms of the buyer,

Go easy with the horses with their
first were. I are not 1 , , -
Let them cow into it gradually or
you may lose the use of them for the
whole season.
Tests made at the Nebraska Exper
iment Station show that of the
nu
, , , , ,
merou r green feeds tested, cow peas
produce a greater quantity of milk
and butter fat from a given area than
any other crop,
southern plant
The cow pea is a
that the northern
farmers are adopting. It is not only a
valuable feed crop but the wry best '
crop for green manuring.
|
There te a little Mack fly that gets ;
on the inside of horses' ears while at !
work in the warm weather of early
spring that nearly drives them fran
tic. Anoint the inside of the ears in
the morning before going into the
field with a little lord,
for all day anc Is a sure cure.
This will do
ISLAND AN EAGLE PRESERVE.
Birds Regularly Bred and Trapped for
Chinese Emperor.
Off tlit* southwestern coast of Ko
rea there ri: es an immense Isolated
rock of bla<-.'; bn. alt. which forms an
1 island-like peninsula. During the
I days of Chinese supremacy over Ko
| rea thU ' ,iass of V|: ''-'atain projecting
■ Into the sea was kept as an eagle pre
Ti , ov , cs v „„ netted
8< - ne ' 1 lle .'*-»tng < ... ics ter
: each year and seat 10 the emp r or of
; China at Pekin, though whether they
j were trained to catch wolves or an
j telopes or merely kept as pets is not
j certain. The Tartars regularly use
1 eagles for the former purpose, but
these birds were probably Korean sea,
| eagles a. d rather l •.-• sui d for the
chase than the golden c -do. With
the exception of Stellar's sea-eagle,
which prey upon young seals, the Ko
rean sea-oW ■ are the largest of any
species found in temperate countries,
though probably the great forest ea
gle of the Philippines is larger. Their
plumage is very darl . becomes almost
black will) age and the beak is very
pale huff, approaching white.
MADE THE ANIMALS HAPPY.
Sydney Smith's Invention of "Scratch
er" Very Popular.
Sydney y lib's love of animals led
him into ludicrous mistakes at times,
as when, hav'ng given his pigs fer
mented grains, lie found them all j
drunk and ''.grunting 'God Save the
King' about the style," and when he
allowed om of his quadrupeds to swal
, ]ov a mighty dose of pills, boxes and
all.
But
| good idev.
scratcher" was a
1 -Ip had a theory that every
animal <'<>:';'=tg to stretch its back
bone. so he put up his ''universal
scratch er."
. . J '•'•' :!ri, fdsed role, rest-1
ing on n u •• i and a low post, adapted,
to every 1 : bf, from a horse to aj
lamli.'' ]? • f
i
j ] )e ^ ro i...
all the gates used to
after the erection of the
- - t sustained any dam
age and the only question was which
serai cher
was th'
more pleased With the inves
tion, he or tea animals as they titil
late 1 their hides.
,
i
DISRAELI AS A PLAGIARIST.
Statesman Appropriated Brilliant
V/or.ds of Other Men.
A recently published volume on Dis
raeli singles out as one of the most
brilliant cf Disraeli's sayings a sen
tence which that statesman appro
priated without acknowledgment from
' Bacon's of Great Place"; "Ask
• qoui ' i.: i times—of the ancient
• y mt ..
which is best, of the mod
ern time:-, that which is fittest." The
th £ :t
most frequently quoted of all Dis
raeli' s;
s was similarly appro
'prited bj him without acknowledg
ment. from l.'.'-rd Shaftesbury: ".Men of
| sense
j
i
oh of the same religion."
j "And v ' a js that religion, my lord?"
: "That :.i -i of sense never tell." Dis- I
raeli, how < -ver.
arc
r himself appro
' print---! a joke of Gladstone's which i
the *.•••:- r i ■ nov volume at- !
, trilur--- to ■ • ,- a deputation is I
I a ru ** - ' ' n f in" mnv' !
| but ■ ' SiRn,fj,ng mauy * j
i
no
:
-
-•--•-*—
BIRTH CF A GEYSER,
j -
Smooth Lagoon Changed to Fiery
Caldron in Few Minutes.
- Near (he far.: y- .-ad erratic gevser
of Waim Zealand—so
■ whimsical in its spoutings and times!
i of quiet that the oldest Mari in the
regie n cai
hie of the .
lately been horn a new geyser. A
few hi 1 th a
had stopped to look
lagoon rin; d abou vith
slopes, i oen dwellers in the region
were notified of something doing by a
salvo of earthquakes, more than thir
ty shocks in half as many minutes,
The next man who walked that way
found, instead of the placid green
ringed last; m. r b, Ring, bubbling cal
(iron over which hovered and
, .. , .
and robo-r, into fantastic shapes a
^ ense cion:] oi si
more famous l
red
in. The old or and
ser looks placid
then it wears
gain it belches
out wat ^an : . toi e and mud to im-!
mense heights and with immense
noise.
a feathery, foamy cap,
enough, too, sometini
j
Proof That They Diffuse Through the
THF MOVEMENT OF ODORS.
Air Like C
That odors move with the air, or
diffuse through ii 1"
not
of
s and do
pass through it
do, or in swiftly movi
like
j:i waves,
as
sounds
tides
seems to be condu:
■'•VII by
i -ire 'tioU
' •• . n
•'.mil tub s.
such tubes the,- lit —moral
,, r 4 . . , , '• ; , :
' 1 ' - tn' and (he rate of -
travel of an c . j.. ..I,. , !ow 1
Tui r f ... ,
i nat ni .inimonhi i over two hours -
to get through a, tube a yard and a -
, ( V the am
nioria could bo tbD-etr-d hemically at •
ilb0 ut the same time that. Its smell
par- I
emanations,
radium
recent e
prim cut': on
scents
In
rol led. It sty-*med to make lit
tlo Gif' -.p.e in the speed whether
the lie-.,- vi.s hold horizontally or ver-1
;
i
,
:
I
tit-allv. or whether the odor moved up
or ,, - Suect -•«>
Woman Disposes.
At otif* time during tlie life of the
v.
diilsh of Wellington it was currently
rumored in London society that he
'
'
Some friend
about to load Miss Angela Bur
dctt-Coutts to the altar.
ventured to ark the famous soldier if
this was indeed true, and received us
answer. "1 said she deserved to he a
1 did not say 1 would make
■When the same friend re
due h
her cm
prated this to the young lady in ques
tion. the latter observed quietly,
think he ought to have -.mid 'could,' ,
not 'would.' "
I
.■w
At the Sugar Factory.
I'onrtccn cr.rs of nuidiinory
; wt >re shipped lust week at
... . .. ..
; u,m ' »''"<» Binffbaniton, N . 1.
Six cars are on their wav from
'
' ' ' " ll 1 111
light plant is now on the* way
e t) L
»pil!icrne"l, Illinois. 1 Ills
i , ,, , . . ,
completes the shipment* 01
j (•hirier\ T
|
j
j
.
: ,
Works at Burlington, Iowa, have
ma
and structural st.ee! for
the factory.
Two boilers which arrived
recently from the Murray Iron
been installed and the mason
work about them is progressing.
General Manager C. F. Hotch
kiss arrived Tuesday from the
east.
The beets are well advanced
and experienced field men say
| the showing up to the present
time is unusually
few farmers have lost tracts or
Very
wood.
...
j
parts of tracts by lack of help or
other causes, aud the damage
done by jack-rabbits has been less
than was expected.
The field
men tire writing contracts for next
year's crop, and inquiries are
coming from Big Lost river about
the analysis
of the test crops
which are being raised this
aiu j f or information about
aj a Ooiunierci.
year,
raising
j
j
It
crop next year,
is not likely that any definite
action can be taken on this matter
until after the Lost River Fair and
i ihe analysis of the test croj
LIFE IN COLD COUNTRIES.
Two Minutgs for Hot VYater to Be
Turnod to Ice.
Here are some of the experiences
which David T. Hanbury records
typical of those he first met in Alaska:
"The cold could not be kept out of
even the most palatial examples of
dome- lie architecture which Dawson
City would at that time boast, but the
aut'uor stuck to the cult of the morn
ing tub.
as
After I had melted the pail
of ice on the 'airtight' stove I poured
some of the water two inches deep
into the bathtub, which I had moved
to the rear of the room, where there
was no heat.
Not two minutes had
elapsed before I threw off my chamois
j pajamas in the front room and,
i ing the eommunicatin
I j
open
ioor, stepped
hurriedly into the bathtub, for I had
Quick as I had been
i no time to lose
! »,
I ," c a ! ' lf! ! ' ,e ha<1 l,een Quicker and
! ' :;:eppod into the tub with
j both feet, wrenching with*
i ' l,K ' r ' irom a beam hard by, j
j 1 dipped or. tl.e newly frozen ice into |
j f " b 815orer ' ve we ut, soap, tub
''' '■ ir}Sf "'b separated in different)
j qumter3 <rf tlm room. Those two min
| ut< , ' a ' I su ® ce( i to transmute
water ,nto smooth and glassy ice." j
a great
-
my
V ean Widows Never Remarry.
r < has many
(
widows .i.n:: r - ;i -. rr jfo widow
he really "smart set"' would ever
di r young
oath'
; of h r huv' and may have followed
| her
I'
j v.oni
I h 00 7 i;
1
wedding. Married life is by no
means an unmixed blozsiug to the
1 , ho r - .nps pernetual widow
: ■ pc r-:.j.;-cTio?,able if it
wore not for the necessity of perpetu
ally y pring mourning for the depart
This n:cans that during the whole
of In lb ' ,' e D limited to blue, black
cd.
and get < n as colors for her costumes.
Where V' ing Is Unknown.
It has ' n known to ethnol
ogists
tribes
Ing war. ml;
and the M:
many primitive
among
s:i.i 1 (, the practice of kiss
... Among the Lapps
rubbing of noses oc
cupi-'d *"•: 1 'ice. The average native
of Japan, a country which promises
to take so important a place in the
making of future history, still knows
nothin' of the practice of kissing.
1.
The Bachelor's Song.
(In one of the rtates of (he Argentine
Re, :i,l:r tcii-eJors have to pay u tine
oj .hi n.->ntn up to the age of 20,
<: o from CO ti) .15, and _.L6 a
month • iin-v ri'.ioh the age of oO.)
Since my tv.-- til th birthday I hau Hied
With no (iie-e-s to win a bride;
jjy hi art had boon returned with thanks
Jiy Cl- 1 la-lies in endless ranks.
Bui. ;u--t":.u of the balm that the jilted
lacks - -
The stare
^ \\ fcve'ry year.
H cane : nit •-.•.em: ivc. lor
1 wa8 "' t " bauhelor '
l-i'Aii on mo with a tux,".
;■ me
Fearing . my i n'. wouldn't stand the
At thL'T 1 , of - ,j trled nf , aln .
Bought . - --oi ;,s of tin: latest'style,
■:
But—w;-;
Nohvy
And !
Don if ■
Doll: -
4 I-'
I
a . i mg smile;
.:umu understand—
A lu-.ii-t and hand;
11 - Inutal, callous way,
1 1 made me pay.
nutn: . r of twenty-fout i
bachelor.
b'Mij
My r ,
A sin e
Halrh
Troubled. u-<
Ant for n
Firm uhv
But did i.
No; ii ni
St-vi-i.-'y
I paid . , i
I- i i.ilnl-iv found me still
i , k sen re it of a Jill;
1 dull and stout,
;, i a twinge of gout;
- ■■"•■lions J could not
long lo share iny lot.
L'-l sorry for me?
<1 my fine by three,
a mi. a couple more
a b.'. ehelor.
j
.
J write i: •
On tin
As rln-.r
Tn- io, l
It seem.- t -. t
A cruel 1 1 -'-.I bachelor.
with n borrowed quill;
-- .-ni unpaid tailor's bill. |
will doubtless guess,
o e is my address,
dy refuge for
—London Chronicle.
Basalt Breezes.
Bishop Win. Dye commenced
tlie construction of u liouso on tlie*
. . ...
townmte August 1st.
i Three blinking beHUtiqp were
. , r , , ,
; lidded I ins week to tile hollies of
j Win. I>v<'. D. L. Dope and K. T.
,, .
j
.1, II. Berg recently Hold iiis
lower ranch to Mr. Galloway,
through the Blackfoot Real Estate
Company.
The three Davis brothers, con
stituting the Davis Mercantile Co.
arrived recently and opened busi
ness this week.
They are from
Arizona, and will deal in -hay,
grain, farming implements and
general merchandise.
The Blackfoot Real Estate
Company are lifting the burdens
from some of the heavy laden land
owners. The last sale made was
thirty acres for Alvtnde Porter at
$100 an acre, and Mr. Porter will
erect another cottage on the town
site, no less attaactive in appear
ance than others which he has
erected heretofore.
K«*al lOwtiitt* Transfers for the Week.
11. H. O']iaver to R. R. Lamb, 3 lots.
Blk. 39. Idaho Falls, $150.
U. S. to H. J.
Peterson,, patent. 160
acres. f
1. R. Smith to .If L. Morgan, lots in
Blackfoot, $2800.
I). T. Keefer to Leo Hill, lots 9 and
10. blk. 1, Idaho Falls, $1750.
Co. Treas. to Ed Creswell. lot 30. blk.
13. Blackfoot. $39.30.
C. S. to Jas. A. Cameron, patent. 160.
Co. Treas. to A. Williamson, lots 32
and 36, blk. 42, Idaho Falls, #1.62.
Co. Treas. to II. Peterson, lots 20-22,
blk. 27, Idaho Falls. $2.55.
R. \Y. .Shangnon to W. II.
lot in Idaho Falls. #1.00.
1'. S. to Thos. Cook, patent. 160
acres.
C. It. Edson to Win. Vnderwood, lots
13, 14, 15, Black 41. Elmwood addition,
Blackfoot. $575.
If. S. to Wm.
acres.
Mary Hartvig'sen to .1. C. Jensen. 40
$400.
Mary A. Duncan to J. C. Duncan. 10
acres. $800.
J. Duncan to J. C. Jensen, so acres
$2800.
li. II. (j'Ha-ver to A. A. Hutchins, lot
21. blk. 22, Idaho Falls. $35.
Alice McGill to A. McGill, lot t. blk.
32. Idaho Falls. #1.
J. Woodhams to .1. 11. Reesor, 87
acres, $2000,
S. M. Yates to E. C Trimmer, lots 11
12,13. 14.
#1000.
('row.
B.
li. I'ope. patent 160
act
16, blk. 58. Blackfoot,
15.
j they are here.
The carload of Milwaukee
mowers rnkes -nid liinders We
! • , .
are 1,1 Die market to do business
standard prices,
in the bnildintr formerly used bv
J
and furnish you the best goods at
We are located
Bridge street,
K. W. West, .
Agent,
Studebakers on
Blackfoot.
World's Fair Kates via Denver & Kio
Grande.
Butte to St. Louis and return

S47.50.
Butte to Chicago ami return,
1.
$52.50.
Butte to St. Louis, returning
via Chicago or vice versa, $53.75.
Tickets on sale every Tuesday,
and
...
May to October inclusive,
j une 9 10 and 11, final limit
three mouths,
; in both directions,
City, Denver and the
i scenery of Colorado.
1
Stopovers allowed
See Salt Lake
famous
Denver A r Rio Grande Pity
Ticket Office, 51 East Broadway,
Butte.
40tf
(i. W. Fitzgerald,
General Agent.
i
I). W. M. GOOD, D. D. S.,
DENTIST,
Blackfoot, Idaho.
DU. FRANK F. McATEE,
DENTIST,
Blackfoot, Idaho, j
R. S. RUPP,
Architect and Contractor. j
Flans and specifications furnished, and estl- j
mates made on short notice.
Blackfoot, Idaho, j
w 'A- sfe* •A' si? "A' 'jk °ik 4r" "ik 5ik °ik jk ir
't'" T ''T" °lr 'T" 'T* T
#
,
*
John J. Tuppcr
#
#.
#
*
*
Furniurte Store on Bridge St.
#
*
#
#
Carries a Full Line of
*
•M
#
New and Second Hand
FURNITURE
*
#
f
#
*
#
#
# I am satisfied it will pay the public to
call and inspect my stock before
purchasing elsewhere
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
Next Door to Doyle Bros ®L West
#
#
•2&r c q JWz. Njjffc 0 ajjfo 0 4 ;iL° oJ^jLxi hr r ' a 4f|y*
a'o r o
feooi Sampit Wooms
■5\ts\ CUs. 8. &«T\)\ce
*3\ve Tj>Vae\^oo\ \Co\eV,
T)an\tV Treg.
C,eT\Vr&\,V^ £>oc&\e<i, 6wos'v\e \\vc 6 . 5. TiepoV
'Ti&T vt\ CowrvecYvow
J'fiAacV.^otA, idsAvo
£7
.a, y w t
W* P-.VJ- »•
£Tu]
ft
i n
v
m
SS
!
m
-
JSBm
i
a !
,v
:
n
r,
Vtt.jt.
"SCENIC' LINE OF THE WORLD."
*
4
V
V
The Direct Through Route to the
4
WORLD'S FAIR!
Via Salt Lake City, Colorado Springs
Denver, and the Magnificent Scenery of
COLORADO
STOPOVERS
CHEAP RATES FAST TIME
V
h
4
A L L OWED
k
T


For full particulars, call upon or address
G. W. FITZGERALD,
General Ageut
Butte, Montana.
4
4
5 I East Broadway
t
»*H
A
+
4
f
t m
4
41
th^
VA
\Wmmt
I 1 Salt hake V
^ip- WW f
* 7 4
Counectlous mude y
AND
4
4
•5*
f
Only Transcontinental Line passing through &ilt Lake City,
in Ogden Union depot with all trains of the O. S. L. Ky.
*
4
4
3 FAST THROUGH TRAINS DAILY 3
V
f
¥
THREE DISTINCT sCENI
ROUTES PULLMAN PALACE AND ORDINARY SLEEPING CARS to Denver, Omaha
f * Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago without change. Free Reclining Chair Cars, Person -a
ally Conducted Excursions, a perfect Dining Car Service. For rates, folders, etc., inquire J
of nearest ticket agent specifying the Rio Grande Route or write
G. \Y. FITZGERALD. General Ageut. P.utte, Mont.
4
Leaving Ogden at 7:15 a. in.. 2:15 p. m. and 7:(K) p. tn.
*
4
4
V
t
. ...
THE REPUBLICAN PRINTING OFFICE
Is in no way an ordinary country printing office. I he machinery is
all of the latest and most improved patterns and is driven by electric
power. The type assortment is large and varied, comprising the neat
est of the late and mo$t popular faces. The shop is thoroughly equipped
for every description of printing and is a business house with business
methods. The ftrideSt secrecy is maintained with all work and orders
are handled with precision and promptitude.
CITY im STABLE:
DAVID ALLEN, Prop.
BLACKFOOT,
i
i
i
li
W . E. Barnhart
,1. H. McDonai.d
KlcftowaU d. H>aTT\\\aY\,
Dealers In
Choice
lam
SAWii
awii CWtj TvoyeT\\j,
McDonald's addition
Danilson's addition
Montgomery's addition t
TitacWDot,
HaViu
>
- Lu

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