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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, September 08, 1905, Image 4

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The Idaho Republican
BYRD TBEOO. Editor.
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING
PUBLISHED BY
REPUBLICAN PRINTING OO.. Ltd.
BLACKFOOT. ID ABO.
Entered at the postofflee at Blackfoot, Ida
ho, as second class mutter.
Original poetry, card of thanks and resolu
t Ions of sympathy will be charged for at
ular local advertising rates.
Pay no money to agents except on written
authority from the office.
reg
- *8.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.
18.50 PER YEAR ON ACCOUNT.
"WHAT 18 WORTH OOIHO AT ALL 18 W08TH 00IH8 WELL."
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WEEK AFTER NEXT.
Do You Remember?
Do you renumber. little wife,
How years ago we two together
Saw naught but love Illumine life
In eunny days or winter weather?
Do you remember how we two
Would stare Into each other's eyes,
TUI all the earth grew heavenly blue,
And speech was lost in happy sighs?
Do you another thing recall,
That used to happen often then;
How, aimply passing In the hall,
We'd stop to smile and kiss again?
Do you remember how I sat
And, reading, held your hand in mine,
Caressing it with gentle pat—
One pat for every blessed line?
Do you recall while at the play
Through hours of agony we tarried?
1 lovers' griefs brought us dismay;
Oh, we rejoiced when they were mar
ried.
The
Ah. me. 'twas years and years ago
When all this happened that I sing.
And many a time the winter snow
Has slipped from olive slopes of spring.
And now—oh. nonsense; let us tell;
A flg for laugh of maids or men;
Tou'll hide your blushes? I'll not. Well—
We're ten times worse than we were
then.
-Century.
A Big Land Move.
C. S. McConnell and Geo. A. Day of
the State Land office were out in Fre
mont county last week selecting lands
for the state to be taken in lieu of
worthless lands taken in the Bitter Root
country They selected 202,600 acres
lying along the east side of the valley
and on the lower bench. Some which
has been fanned has grown wheat, rye
and beets of good quality, and in one
field a binder was cutting a crop of rye
which had already yielded one cutting
which was taken off for hay. Some
tracts showed good crops without any
irrigation, and it is {he purpose of the
commissioner to see what can be done in
the way of dry farming. The lands will
be offered for lease subject to sale, and
some valuable settlements will be added
to Fremont county as well as some good
money to the state treasury. The above
named gentlemen were in Blackfoot
Thursday filing on land for the state,
and finished Friday morning.
Stevens-Carberry.
A very pretty wedding was solemnized
Wednesday at the home of A. IL Stevens.
The contracting parties were Elmer C.
Stevens and Miss Johanna Carberry.
The bride was beautifully attired in
white silk mull and carried a boquet o'
bride's roses. The groom wore the con
ventional black. The bridesmaid was
Miss Lillian Powell, and wore a pretty
costume of pink. Mr. Nels Halgeson
was best man. After the ceremony and
congratulations the guests repaired to
the dining room where an elaborate
luncheon was served. The prevailing
colors of the decorations of the table
and dining room were pink and white.
The Republican extends congratula
tions.
is
The meeting of the Kensington de
partment of the Current Event Club
has been postponed till Monday the
eighteenth.
Where Inventor Got Idea.
It was from watching his wife fold
up a pair of stockings tjiat the in
ventor of the modern India rubber to
bacco pouch first got his idea.
we
top
at
of
of
ter
Resisting an Officer.
The truth of the following is
vouched for by a correspondent: An
iFish drayman in a small village was
elected constable. The morning after
election, t^hile doing his
business with a pair of old horses that
had seen many better days, and with
a long stick for a whip jabbing first
one and then the other, he was heard
to say: "Git up, here, git up,
lazy ould crow baits, git up. 1 niver
seed the like of yez before. I'll have
yez arrested for resisting an officer of
the la."—Law Notes.
customary
ye
For Sale Cheap.
t Furniture of 5 room house and house
for rent. Well located, close in. See C.
V. Evans at Scott A Co's. Drug Store.
Our Public Library
Last spring a public library was es
tablished and has been kept open for
the public all summer. It has been
one of the cozy spots of the town and
and now when the evenings are get
ting longer and more men and boys
will be in town is a good time to con
sider how we can provide for its main
tenance for that part of the year when
it will do the most good to have it
open. The operations at the sugar
factory will bring many people to
town who must of necessity spend
much of their time in public places,
and we owe it to them from a business
standpoint as well as from a philan
thropic standpoint to give them a
chance to spend their evenings in a
Men who are
quiet pleasant way.
reading and writing are not disturb
ing other people nor carousing, and
they are more apt to be on duty dur
ing working hours, which is 'quite an
item to employers.
The following table will show what
it has cost to maintain the reading
room for the summer, and the average
attendance of men, women and chil
dren. Unless some arrangements are
made soon for its maintenance it will
be closed.
Now that the building is already
equipped, the two large items of furni
ture and repairs will not need to he
met again, which makes it easier to
maintain it for the next six months
than for the past.
Report of Treasurer, Blackfoot Read
ing Room, September 5th, 1905. The
following is a statement of the receipts
and disbursements of the Reading Room
funds for the term beginning April 17th
to September 5th, 1905:
Total receipts from sub
scribers,.
Paid for Daily papers
Paid for Magazines
Paid for rent of b'ld'g.
Paid Librarian.
Paid expenses repair
building ..
Paid for chairs, tables
and fixtures.
Paid for Coal.
Balance on hand Sep
tember 5th, 1905.
8365.59
8 7.75
28.30
90.00
. 84.00
81.69
42.40
6.75
17.85
8365.59 8365.59
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. F. GAGON.
(Signed.)
ATTKNDANCE FOB AUGUST.
Total Daily Average
Men
Women
Boys
Girls
. 243 .
. 53
. 282
. 8.1
1.8
9.4
40
1,3
in
OLD TOM, THE GOLFER.
One of the Beet Known of Devotees of
tho Ancient Gama.
One of the best golfers that ever laid
out a course or drove a ball was old
Tom Morris. They called him "old"
to distinguish him from his son, who
was the most brilliant player of his
time, and to whose memory a fine
monument was erected over his grave
In St. Andrews. Once, when old Tom
was greenkeeper at Prestwick, In Ayr
shire, he took part In a foursome, his
partner being Capt. Wolfe Murray.
Next day the postman h- nded Tom a
letter simply addressed to "The Mls
ser of 8hort Putts, Prestwick." This
shows how well known Tom was, and
also what had been
his play in the match,
the question of Sunday play was
being discussed, Tom was asked
for his opinion. "Well," he
said, "if man doesna need a rest, I
ken the green does." He retired from
the post of greenkeeper o the Royal
and Ancient Club of St. Andrews at
the age of 82 years, but in spite of his
great age, played a fine game to the
very last.
wrong with
When
Sugar a Universal Need.
"Sugar has modified the history of
Europe and of the world in more ways
than one," says a writer. "Used four
centuries ago, almost exclusively in
the preparation of medicines, and long
afterword nn article of luxury only ac
cessible to the rich, it lias by enlarged
production and cheapened manufac
ture been brought within the reach of
all. The universal use of this prac
tically pure carbohydrate, which is
not only a freely burning fuel and
proteid sparer, but a muscle food. In
creasing the power of doing work
and lessening fatigue, must have had
widespread and beneficial effects on
the general health. Especially In the
case of children, whose greed of sugar
is the expression of a physiological
want, has that food been valuable in
conducing to growth, contentment and
well-being."
It
The Original Telegraph.
Claude Chappe, who drowned him
self in a well on January 3 a hun
dred years ago, was described in his
time as "the inventor of the tele
graph," says the London Telegraph. It
was not the ciectrlc telegraph that
we know, of course, but a very prim
itive wireless contrivance, a sema
phore, in fact, consisting of an up
right post, a transverse bar on the
top and two arms working on pivots
at the ends of this bar. By means
of a code and the placing of a series
of these posts so that each could be
seen from the next, messages were
carried over fifty leagues in a quar
ter of an hour. The French legislative
assembly adopted the system; but in
sinuations that Cl'appe had stolen it I six
from others preyed upon his mind and is8
1 or
ber
any
drove him to suicide.
>DEN
HARNESS GALLS.
Before beginning the hard spring
work Is the time to study the cause,
treatment and prevention of injurloF
commonly known as harness galls. In
juries of this class may be due to one
or more of several causes.
Faulty harness are a common cause
of galls. Harness by being badly fit
ted to the animal, and also by
of their hard-unpliable condition,
when In want of oil and proper
The collar should be made to fit the
animal, for which It is Intended, with
out padding, if possible. The use of
pads Is not to be advised on account
of thpir liability to change shape from
pressure, and also because the' pad
serves to prevent the free circulation
of air beneath the collar and the lia
bility to become foul from the
cumulation of dirt. The collar should
not be so narrow at the top as to
cause the neck to wedge, as this may
so bruise the muscles as to cause the
serious condition known as fistula.
If the collar Is too long the pressure
is brought too far down and produces
the common galls so frequently no
ticed near the point of the shoulders.
Undue pressure upon a limited area of
the skin causes the skin to die be
cause the pressure prevents the part
from receiving the right amount of
blood supply. The collar that is so
loose as to admit of a rubbing, rasp
ing movement produces the gall.
It is excellent practice to bathe the
shoulders of the work animal with
cold water when the harness are re
moved at noon and evening. In the
treatment of galls do not apply grease
of any kind, as it makes cleansing dif
ficult and serves to accumulate dirt.
In the treatment of all wounds grease
is an abomination.
reason
as
care.
ac
Stock is now out to pasture, but It
does not follow that we do not need
to do anything more than let the bars
down and drive the cattle out. If
ever cows needed extra care It is
when they first go from the barn. The
long winter has drawn upon their re
serve strength more than we know.
We ought to keep up the grain ra
tion for some time, and be sure there
Is a good supply of pure water.
Is a good supply of pure water.
INFLUENCE OF THE WIND ON
VEGETATION.
i
The influence of the wind on vege
tation has been the subject of a re
port by Prof. Fruh to Swiss geograph
ers. The effect is a powerful one,
especially on trees, and even the
presence or absence of forests may
be determined by the character of the
prevailing wind or the conditions that
modify its action. The wind acts es
pecially as a drying agent, in this
way giving a special aspect to many
plants. When the wind is almost al
ways from the same quarter, the
plants show greater development upon
one side, trees are smaller on the
windward edges of forests, and trunks
and branches are permanently bent to
leeward. The deformities are most
marked near the sea or in flat regions.
The cherry, the plum, the walnut, the
black poplar, the ash and cer
tain pines are very sensitive to the
wind, but mountain pines and certain
firs offer great powers of resistance,
and these are recommended for re
foresting wind-swept lands.
"Within the year's great storehouse old
Are gathered sheaves of wealth untold^—
Glad Is the song of whirrin
Of plenteousness there is no
God's blessing covers all the earth,
tils harvests all the fields and hills."
g mills;
dearth.
BARN CLEANING.
Every farmer should take as much
pride in a clean, well-ordered barn, as
the housewife does in her freshly
cleaned rooms.
On stormy days when the work out
side must wait, the barn cleaning
may be done; the corners, windows,
stairways, shelves and closets, where
old harness, bottles and odds and ends
of all kinds collect, should be cleared
out and the places well swept with a
stiff old brush or broom.
Then separate the useful pieces
from the rest and replace in order;
burn or bury the remainder. If boards
are loose or steps need renailing or a
knot-hole wants closing, or the
mangers, feed bins, or stall partitions
want fixing, have a saw, hammer and
nails and pieces of boards handy;
take time to do it right; don't try to
do it all in one day, but make a neat
piece of work of it.
Don't turn the colts to pasture un
til you have looked them over care
fully. If from any cause they have
become lousy dust Persian Insect
powder In the hair thoroughly. This
should be repeated two or three times.
It is perfectly safe and sure.
Did you ever compare the merits of
the cow eating a quarter-dollar
tion and yielding one and a half
pounds of butter daily with another
eating the same food and giving but
half a pound of butter? Sit down
minute and figure it out.
Reading Notice,
Every man owes it to himself and his
family to master a trade or profession,
Read the display advertisement of the
six Morse Schools of Telegraphy, in this
is8 , U0 alld lea , rn tow easily a young man
or lady may learn telegraphy and be
aureda position.
ra
a
lots
ple
And by the way it is well to remem
ber that a pound of mutton can be
produced cheaper than any other
meat; is freer from disease and more
nutritious and healthful than meat of
any other kind.
the
and
as
ROY SCANS.
This new accession to the forage
plants of the United States comes from
Japan. It may be sown from May
til July, and, with two or three good
rains, will make a large yield of
cellent hay, and, if sown early,
beans also. This plant is a great ad
dition to the number of leguminous
plants that have, within the last twen
ty years, attracted so much attention
as nitrogen-yielding plants. The soy
bean is probably richer in nutrition
than any of them. It is a prolific
bearer, and as much as twenty to thir
ty bushfels of beans per acre are not
uncommon on good land.
1111
ex
of
The soy
bean will stand as much dry weather
as Kaffir corn, and for that
a favorite crop in the arid regions
Kansas and the Northwest. The value
of this bean as a feed for hogs has
been fully tested at the Kansas experi
ment Station. It was found that In
dian corn fed alone to hogs made from
six to seven pounds gain in weight per
bushel, but if a proportion of one-fifth
of soy beans was added to the feed the
increase in weight to the hogs
practically doubled,
best when drilled in rows thirty inches
apart and the beans dropped three or
four inches apart in the row. They
may be cultivated with a harrow or
cultivator. Level cultivation is best.
Half-bushel of seed is enough to plant
an acre. If planted for hay alone, they
may be sown on well-prepared land
like cowpeas—one bushel to the
and cover with a harrow,
rather late to plant this legume for
making a heavy yield of beans. The
pods, like cotton bolls, continue to
mature until frost, but there is scarce
ly time enough when sown in July
for the pods to mature in large
bers.
reason is
of
was
8cy beans do i
acre,
July is
num
It pays wonderfully well to reclean
the seed oats and other grain you sow.
With a good fanning mill and
who knows how to operate it, we may
take out almost all the foul stuff that
Is left by the threshing machine. And
every such seed removed means
cleaner harvest next fall.
s
a man
!
a
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HORTICULTURE.
1
There lives a man In every town
Whose name Is Peter Tumbledown,
Of Horticulture he has heard
And seems to hate the very word.
All garden work he tries to shun
And by his wife this work is done;
At flowers he will never gaze,
He likes the fruit his neighbors raise.
To grow his fruit he does not try;
Claims 'tls cheaper to buy.
But when berries are In their prime.
He's out of cash, just at that time.
Watermelons are his son's delight
His neighbor's fruit they
night,
The boys soon tire of a farmer's life
And mingle In the city's strife.
Nor for his girls is there a charm
About his gardenless old farm;
They declare, if ever they wed.
Their husbands must be city bred.
If. from his faults, you would be free;
To Horticulture you should flee;
Study it well and practice more;
There's happiness for you in store.
—C. L. Pearsons.
s
t
'coon" at
ii
It very often occurs that a great
deal of fruit, and sometimes vege
tables, go to waste because of the
lack of knowledge that will preserve
them in some manner until they are
needed. Fruits are easily dried and
canned, but vegetables are not
easily preserved for future use. We
are wiser, however, than we were a
decade ago, and we are till learning
things about canning and drying vege
tables.
so
First Life Insurance Policy.
The first life insurance policy of
which the details are on record
suited In a lawsuit: William G.vbbons
insured himself op June 15, 1583, for
£383 against dying In twelve months;
he did die on May 18 of the next year
—and the disgusted underwriters (the
company of those days) contested
payment on the plea that he had
lived twelve months of twenty-eight
days each!—The World's Work.
re
Nail Sale.
My stock of nails, in any size or quan
ity, while they last will be sold at 3%
cents per lb.
D. H. Biethan.
WANT ADS
HELP WANTED:—A good dining
room girl. Not an amateur. Cottage
Hotel.
56
MONEY TO LOAN-At 8
Plenty of it. Blackfoot Real
See them sure if you wish to borrow. 53tf
per cent.
Estate
Co.
FOR SALE—2 surreys, one almost
new; one wagon almost new. one two
horse cart, one good surrey harness.
D. H. Bikxhan.
50tf
FOR SALE. A few shares of Corbett
Slough and Grove City Ditch stock.
H. C. Dipple.
FOR SALE—or will exchange for
good residence property 80 head of
good young stock cattle inquire of
Brown k Eldredge.
FOR SALE OR TRADE-Thorough
bred Poland China pigs. Registered, if
preferred, in American Poland China
.lecords. Price 810. in cash or grain.
Arthur J. Synder, Springfield, Idaho.
LOTS FOR SALE. I HAVE SOME
lots 50 by 100 feet near the new school
house, and some acre tracts in the Dip
ple addition for sale on easy terms.
H. C. Dipple.
FOR SALE:—Ten stands of Bees in
52 tf.
patent hives. O. F. Smith.
FOR SALE:—A fresh milch cow and
the call. John Oborn. Snake River
Bridge.
tf.
FOR SALE- Nine head of good milch
cows and five yearlings and two-year
olds. J. R. Algood, between Groveiand
and Moreland. 52-4p
TAILORING.
Now is the time to get your new fall
suit, cut and fit to your measure ...
Cleaning and Repairing. Special at
tention given to ladies' skirts, jackets
etc. Mottos-Satisfaction none better
Norton & Pearson,
BlacKfoot, Idaho.
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North Main Street.
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SEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING OF
S'
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The Idaho Inter Mount
i
Fair For 1905.. j
am
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COMMENCING MONDAY, SEPT. 25TH. And
" ENDING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH.
Greater, Grander, More Elab
orate Than Ever $10,000
In Premiums.
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4] The best Products of the farm and the finest
stock of the range will be on exhibition to com
pete for these grand prizes. AH the Leading
industries of the state will be represented. Live
stock auction sales will be held Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday on the grounds and under
the auspices of the association. Fine Music every
minute of the day. Special attractions every
evening. No expense has been spared to make
this the best meeting in the history of the associa
tion.
4J Come early and meet your neighbors; the
people of this great state. Get 'new ideas.
Bring the best you have to show others. See
what others do.
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It will be
As well
an Education
as Recreation.
It will add to the pleasures of your life,
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For premium lists and all other information address;
James A. Piuney, President.
W. F. Dolan, Secretary.
*•
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Your CHance
Has Come.
. f
The Wrought Iron Range Co., are here
with their all wrought iron Ranges, the
best that are made. The new, im
proved 1904, sold only by our traveling
salesmen, direct from the factory, saving
you the middle man's profit. Every
range fully guaranteed. Examine before
you buy, they are the very best.
*?
&/>e WROUGHT IRON
RANGE CO.
r
WE DO JOB PRINTING
Our Butter Wrapper Paper is the
best; get our prices before buying.
Jt

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